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Full text of "School of Medicine Catalog 1965-1973"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/medicine65unse 




JNIVERS1TY of MARYLAND 

BULLETIN 




School of Medicine 



1965-1967 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as 
cable contract between tru i the University of Maryland 

any time within the stud 

reserves the right, at any time, to ident to withdraw w] 

siders such action to be in the best intc the Uni\ 



Vit-r 



School of Medicine 



THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



School Calendar For 1965-1967 



1965 



September 7 



September 8 



First semester 

September 9 

November 24 

29 

December 23 



A.M. 

A.M.* 

A.M.* 

A.M. 

A.M. 

A.M.* 

A.M.* 



1966 

January 



3 

27 

28 
29 



Tuesday — 1st year orientation 9 

2nd and 3rd year registration 9 

2nd and 3rd year payment of fees 9 

Wednesday — 1st year orientation 9 

3rd year orientation 9 

1st and 4th year registration 9 

1st and 4th year payment of fees 9 

begins September 9, 1965, and ends January 29, 1966 

Thursday — Instruction begins for all classes. 

Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins at 5:00 P.M. 

Monday — Instruction resumes for all classes. 

Thursday — Christmas recess begins at 5:00 P.M. 



Monday — Instruction resumes for all classes. 
Thursday — Registration and payment of fees for 2nd 

semester.* 
Friday — Registration and payment of fees for 2nd 

semester.* 
Saturday — Last day of 1st semester. 



* ALL students are expected to complete their registration, including the 
payment of fees on regular registration days. Those who do not, complete their 
registration on the prescribed days will be charged a PENALTY FEE OF $20.00. 
The Office of the Registrar is in Howard Hall and the Office of the Comptroller is 
in the University; both offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM. to 
4:45 P.M. 



Second 
January 31 
February 22 
April 7 



8 

12 

18 

19 

20 

27 

30 

31 

2 and 3 

3 

3 

4 

6 

and 22 



May 



June 



21 



semester begins Monday, January 31, 1966 

Monday — Second semester begins. 

Tuesday — Holiday — Washington's Birthday. 

Thursday — Easter recess begins at 5 P.M. for years 
3 &4. 

Friday — Easter recess begins at 5 P.M. for years 1 & 2. 

Tuesday — Instruction resumes for years 3 & 4. 

Monday — Instruction resumes for years 1 & 2. 

Tuesday — National Board, Part II Examination** 

Wednesday — National Board, Part II Examination** 

Friday — Classes cease at 5 P.M. for year 4. 

Monday — Holiday — Memorial Day. 

Tuesday — Classes cease at 5 P.M. for year 3. 

Thursday and Friday — Examinations for year 3. 

Friday — Classes cease at 5 P.M. for years 1 & 2. 

Friday — Pre-commencement Exercises — Baltimore. 

Saturday — Commencement Exercises — College Park. 

Monday — Examinations for years 1 & 2 through June 9. 

Tuesday and Wednesday — National Board Examina- 
tions, Part I*** 



** National Board Examination dates are TENTATIVE dates. 
*** National Board, Examinations, Part I, for sophomores are held in June; the 
dates will be posted on the bulletin boards in due time. 



School Calendar For 1966-1967 



1966 

August 22 } 
September 6 



Re-examinations for advancement 

Re-examinations for advancement 

Tuesday — 1st year orientation 9 

2nd and 3rd year registration 9 

2nd and 3rd year payment of fees 9 

Wednesday — 1st year orientation 9 

3rd year orientation 9 

1st and 4th year registration 9 

1st and 4th year payment of fees 9 



A.M. 

A.M.* 

A.M.* 

A.M. 

A.M. 

A.M.* 

A.M.* 



First semester begins September 8, 1966, and ends January 28, 1967 

September 8 Thursday — Instruction begins for all classes. 

November 23 Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins at 5:00 P.M. 

28 Monday — Instruction resumes for all classes. 

December 23 Friday — Christmas recess begins at 5:00 P.M. 



1967 

January 



3 Tuesday — Instruction resumes for all classes. 

26 Thursday — Registration and payment of 2nd semester 

fees. 

27 Friday — Registration and payment of 2nd semester fees. 

28 Saturday — Last day of 1st semester. 

* ALL students are expected to complete their registration, including the 
payment of fees on regular registration days. Those who do not complete their 
registration on the prescribed days will be charged a PENALTY FEE OF $20.00. 
The Office of the Registrar is in Howard Hall and the Office of the Comptroller is in 
the University; both offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. to 
4:45 P.M. 

Second semester begins Monday January 30, 1967 
January 30 Monday — Second semester begins. 

Wednesday — Holiday — Washington's Birthday. 
Thursday — Easter recess begin at 5 P.M. for years 3 

and 4. 
Tuesday — Instruction resumes for years 3 and 4. 
Friday — Spring recess begins 5 P.M. for years 1 and 2. 
Tuesday — National Board, Part II Examination** 
Wednesday — National Board, Part II Examination** 
Monday — Instruction resumes for years 1 and 2. 
Saturday — Classes cease at 12 noon for year 4. 
Tuesday — Holiday — Memorial Day. 
Wednesday — Classes cease at 5 P.M. for year 3. 
Thursday — Classes cease at 5 P.M. for years 1 and 2. 
Thursday and Friday — Examinations for year 3. 
Friday — Pre-commencement Exercises — Baltimore 
Saturday — Commencement Exercises — College Park 

Campus. 
Monday — Examinations for years 1 and 2 through June 
8. 
** National Board Examination dates are TENTATIVE dates. 



February 


22 


March 


23 




28 


April 


14 




18 




19 




24 


May 


27 




30 




31 


June 


1 


1 and 2 




2 




3 




5 







MAY 




JUNE 






JULY 




AUGUST 




s 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 






1 




12 3 4 


5 




1 2 3 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 




2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 




9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


m 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


2U 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 


28 29 30 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 


30 31 


*o 


30 


31 
















©* 




SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 






NOVEMBER 




DECEMBER 




S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


^ 




12 3 4 




1 


2 




12 3 4 5 6 




12 3 4 




5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


s 


6 7 8 9 10 11 




12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 




19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 




26 


27 28 29 30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 28 29 


30 


28 


29 30 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 






JANUARY 




FEBRUARY 






MARCH 




APRIL 




S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 






1 




12 3 4 


5 




12 3 4 5 




1 2 




2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 




9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 




16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 




23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 


28 




27 


28 29 30 31 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 




30 


31 

MAY 




JUNE 






JULY 




AUGUST 


*o 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


<o 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 




1 2 3 


4 




1 2 




12 3 4 5 6 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


o» 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 




22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


23 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 




29 


30 31 


26 


27 28 29 30 




24 
31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


28 


29 30 31 






SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 




DECEMBER 




S 


M T W T F S 
12 3 


S 


M T W T F 


S 

1 


S 


M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 


S 


M T W T F S 
12 3 




4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 




11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 




18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 


23 

30 


24 25 26 27 28 
31 


29 


27 


28 29 30 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 






JANUARY 




FEBRUARY 






MARCH 




APRIL 




S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 




1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 




12 3 


4 




12 3 4 




1 




8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 




15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 




22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


16 


17 18i 19 20 21 22 


Is 


29 


30 31 


26- 


27 28 




26 


27 28 29 30 31 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


<o 
















30 




o* 




MAY 




JUNE 






JULY 




AUGUST 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


^ 




1 2 3 4 & 6 




1 2 


3 




1 




12 3 4 5 




7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 




14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 




21 


22 22 24 25 26 27 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 18* 19 20 21 22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 




28 


29 30 31 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 




23 

30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 
31 


27 


28 29 30 31 



CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 2 

1965-1967 Calendar 4 

Aerial View of Campus 6 

Requirements for Admission and Application 7 

Instructions Leading to Degree of Doctor of Medicine 10 

Additional Educational Programs 13 

Tuition, Fees, and Registration 15 

Required Equipment 18 

Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds 20 

General Information 24 

Buildings and Facilities 29 

Affiliated Institutions 37 

Historical Sketch 41 

Administration 44 

Faculty Boards and Committees 46 

Faculty 50 

Organization of Curriculum and Courses of Instruction 81 

Postgraduate Courses Ill 

Matriculants 113 

Summary and Geographical Distribution of Matriculants 123 

Alumni Association 125 

Endowment Fund 126 

Faculty Index 127 

Subject Index 136 

5 




.<—~^ " » m 

.« ill 

-all 
if II 
I' ! 




Requirements For Admission 



Policy on Admissions 

Academic achievement, medical aptitude test scores, recommenda- 
tions from college instructors or premedical committee, and personal 
interview are all carefully considered in evaluating an applicant. A 
student may be denied admission because of unsatisfactory reports in 
any one of these areas. Academic achievement alone does not auto- 
matically insure acceptance as the Committee is equally concerned with 
personality, aptitude, character, integrity, motivation, and assessment of 
the individual as a potential physician. Letters of recommendation are 
requested from at least two science instructors and one non-science 
instructor. Candidates will be expected to complete all required basic 
premedical subjects before July 1 of the year they are planning to enter. 

Matriculants are required to accept the provisions of the Honor Code 
and to agree to assume its obligations prior to registration. A copy of 
the Honor Code and agreement form is sent to each candidate with 
notice of acceptance. 

Preference will be given to Maryland residents but well qualified 
applicants from other areas in the United States or Canada will be 
considered- Applicants from foreign schools must complete at least 
two years of premedical work in an approved college or university in 
the United States or Canada. 

Definition of Resident and Non-Resident 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at 
the time of their registration, their parents have been domiciled in this 
State for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be 
changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and 
become legal residents of the State by maintaining such residence for 
at least six months. 

However, the right of the minor to change from a non-resident to 
resident status must be established by him prior to the registration 
period for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if, at the time of their 
registration, they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six 
months provided such residence has not been acquired while attending 
any school or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active 
duty in the Armed Forces while stationed in Maryland will not be con- 
sidered as satisfying the six month period referred to above, except in 



O Requirements for Admission 

those cases in which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for at least 
one year prior to his entrance into the Armed Services and was not 
enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the perma- 
nent place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile 
may be maintained. 

Requirements for Admission to First Year Class 

Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses 
particularly in the natural sciences. Except under unusual circum- 
stances the stuent should plan a four year curriculum with a suitable 
Arts and Science major, leading to a bachelor's degree. A major in 
an area other than science is quite acceptable although it is not intended 
to divert students from a science major if this is their field of choice. 
The student taking science courses beyond the minimal requirements is 
encouraged to take such subjects as embryology, comparative anatomy, 
psychology, anthropology, physical chemistry, or cellular physiology. 
Courses duplicating medical school work, such as histology, neurology, 
biochemistry, mammalian physiology, human anatomy, and bacteriolo- 
gy are not recommended unless they are required in the student's major 
sequence. Having credit in such courses will not excuse students from 
taking them in medical school. In the non-science area courses in 
English, philosophy, sociology, economics, history, and government and 
politics are recommended. 

A minimum of 90 semester hours (three academic years) of accept- 
able college credit are required exclusive of physical education and 
military science, earned in colleges of arts and sciences whose names 
occur on the current list of "Accredited Institutions of Higher Educa- 
tion" as compiled by the National Committee of Regional Accrediting 
Agencies of the United States- Applicants who will have earned a 
bachelor's degree in arts and sciences before registration for medical 
school from an approved college or university will be given preference 
over applicants who have not completed the requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. Only those courses will be acceptable which are 
approved for credit towards an A.B. or B.S. degree by the university 
or college attended as well as the University of Maryland. 

The following college courses and credits at an acceptable level are 
required before registering for Medical School. 

Semester 
Hours 
General biology or zoology 8 

Inorganic chemistry 8 

Organic chemistry 6 

Quantitative or physical chemistry 3 

General physics 8 

English 12 

Foreign language 6 

No more than 60 hours will be accepted from accredited Junior Col- 



Requirements for Admission Q 

leges and then only if these credits are validated by a college offering a 
Bachelor of Arts or Science Degree. 

Medical College Admission Tests should be taken in May and must 
be taken no later than October of the year preceding the year of 
entrance. Applicants should write the Psychological Testing Corpora- 
tion, 304 East 45th Street, New York, New York 10017, for further 
information and for registration forms. 

Requirements for Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students who have attended approved medical schools are eligible to 
file applications for admission to the second and third year classes only. 
These applicants must meet the current first year entrance requirements 
in addition to presenting acceptable medical school credentials, and a 
medical school record based on courses which are equivalent to similar 
courses in this school. 

No student will be considered who has been dismissed from any 
medical school unless his former Dean submits a letter addressed to 
The Committee on Admissions stating the student is reinstated in good 
standing and eligible for promotion. 

No student will be considered who is not eligible for promotion at 
time of transfer. 

Applicants for admission to third year class are required to complete 
satisfactorily the National Board Examination, Part I, before registra- 
tion. 

Persons who already hold the degree of Doctor of Medicine will not 
be admitted to the Medical School as a candidate for that degree from 
this University. 

No applicants from foreign medical schools will be considered for 
advanced standing. 

Application for admission to advanced standing is made in accord- 
ance with instructions accompanying the application form. 

Method of Making Application 

Requests for application forms should be sent to The Committee on 
Admissions, School of Medicine, 522 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. 

Application for admission to the first year class in September should 
be filed between July 1 and December 31 of the year preceding ad- 
mission. 

Candidates for admission who live or expect to practice Medicine 
in Pennsylvania or New Jersey should apply to their respective State 
Boards of Education for Medical Student Qualifying Certificates. 



Instruction Leading to Degree of 
Doctor of Medicine 

Organization of Curriculum 

The curriculum is organized to permit students to acquire funda- 
mental knowledge of the principles of medicine, establish habits of 
applying critical evaluation and judgment to problems of health and 
disease, and develop ethical principles which inspire trust in their 
patients and respect of the community. 

Instruction encompasses four academic years. The first and second 
years are largely devoted to a study of the medical basic sciences. 
Introductory instruction in clinical areas is given in the second year. 
Instruction in the third and fourth years is principally of the preceptor 
type centered about the patient. Small student groups permit close 
personal relationships. Student research is encouraged during the sum- 
mer recess and during the limited elective time permitted in the sched- 
ule. In most courses the final examination as the sole test of achieve- 
ment has disappeared, and the student's final grade is determined by 
frequent examinations, recitations, conferences, and assigned work 
carried on throughout the course. 

General Faculty Rules 

The University authorities reserve the right to make changes in the 
curriculum, the requirements for advancement and graduation, fees, 
and in rules and regulations whenever expedient. 

The School of Medicine does not accept responsibility for students' 
personal property. 

Students who report for classes later than one week after scheduled 
time will be permitted to begin work only by permission of the Dean. 

Attendance at all scheduled classes is expected. 

Notice of change of address should be submitted promptly to the 
Dean's Office and to the Registrar's Office. 

10 



Grading Systems, etc. 
Grading System 

Official grades are designated by these symbols: 

"3", "2", and "1" — in rank from highest to lowest 
P — satisfactory completion of course 
F — failure 
I — incomplete 
C — condition 

Students will receive a grade for the various disciplines in the manner 
outlined below: 

Anatomy 

Biochemistry 

Physiology 

Microbiology 

Pharmacology 

Pathology 

Psychiatry 

Surgery 

Medicine 

Pediatrics 

Ob-Gyn 

Neurology 

Radiology 

Ophthalmology 

Anesthesiology 

Preventive Medicine 



\ 3, 2, 1, F, I, C 



P, F, I, C 



Advancement and Graduation 

At the end of each academic year the Advancement Committe con- 
venes to review the records of all students in each class. The estimate 
of a student's standing is based on academic achievement, his moral 
and ethical traits, and general evaluation of his fitness for a career in 
medicine. The committee recommends appropriate action to the Fac- 
ulty Board. 

1 . All students will be required to take the comprehensive National 
Board Examinations, Parts I and II, and they will be expected to pass 
the examinations to be advanced from the second to the third year or 
to graduate respectively. 

2. Students in all courses in which National Board Examinations 
are given will be rated "Q" (Qualifying), "C" (Condition) or "F" 
(Failure). Only those students having "Q" in the first year courses 
and no "F's" in the second year courses will be eligible to take National 
Board Examination, Part I. Only those students who have passed 
Part I, received all "Q's" in the third year courses and no "F's" in the 
fourth year courses, will be eligible to take the National Board Exam- 
ination, Part II. 



"I O State Board Examinations, Graduation 

3- Students with "C's" in the second and fourth year courses may, 
at the discretion of the department head, remove the "C" by re-exam- 
ination or by passing the National Board Examination in the subject in 
which they are deficient. 

4. Students with a "C" in any first or third year course must 
remove the "C" by re-examination before being eligible for promotion 
to the second or fourth year. 

5. Final grades will be assigned in those courses for which Na- 
tional Board Examinations are given only when the National Board 
Examinations are passed and will be 3, 2, 1. 

6. Students who fail the National Board Examinations by National 
Board standards will receive a "C" in those subjects in which the score 
is lower than 75. 

7. A rating of "C" obtained as a result of failing the National 
Board Examinations must be removed prior to advancement from one 
year to the next or graduation by re-examination in the conditioned 
subject. 

8. No student will be advanced on probation. 

9. Students who fail re-examinations will be given an "F" and any 
student receiving more than one "F" in a major course in any one 
year will be dismissed from the school. 

Students with one failure or one failure plus one or more conditions, 
at the discretion of the Advancement Committee, may be allowed to 
remove the "F" by repetition of the course, the semester, the entire 
year at Maryland or the course at any school satisfactory to the depart- 
ment head, or may be dismissed- 

Students who repeat a year and do not satisfactorily pass all courses 
with a better than minimum rating may, at the discretion of the Ad- 
vancement Committee, be dismissed. 

10. When circumstances beyond the student's control make it im- 
possible for him to complete a course at the usual time, he will be given 
an Incomplete (I) until such time as he has completed the course. An 
"I" is in no way prejudicial to the final rating or grade of the student 
in the course, but must be removed prior to promotion to the next year. 

11. The faculty reserves the right to determine if a student may 
withdraw, repeat, advance, or graduate on moral and personal grounds 
including traits of character. 

12. All discretionary actions of the Advancement Committee are 
subject to ratification by the Faculty Board and must be presented to 
them at their next meeting. 

Certification for State Board Examinations 

Students at the end of their second and fourth years will be certi- 
fied to the State Board Examiners if they have successfully completed 
the requirements for promotion to the third year or for graduation. 

Attendance at Graduation 

All students are required to attend graduation. Permission to receive 
the degree in absentia must be obtained in advance from the Dean. 



Additional Educational Programs 



Baccalaureate Degree 

Selected students entering the School of Medicine from colleges 
which usually grant a baccalaureate degree after the successful comple- 
tion of. the first year of medicine, are responsible for: a) providing a 
certificate from his college or university that he is eligible for this 
degree, and b) meeting all requirements of the School of Medicine for 
advancement to the second year. 



Graduate Program 

Graduate courses and research opportunities leading to advanced 
degrees are available in most of the basic science departments of the 
School of Medicine. Students pursuing graduate work must register in 
the Graduate School of the University of Maryland and meet the same 
requirements as other graduate students- Detailed information con- 
cerning fees, scholarships, and other material of general nature, may be 
found in the University publication titled An Adventure in Learning. 
This may be obtained from the Office of University Relations, North 
Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land. 



Combined Doctor of Philosophy — 
Doctor of Medicine Program 

Properly qualified medical students may elect to enter the combined 
educational program leading to Doctor of Medicine and a graduate 
degree. Such students may arrange a leave of absence of up to three 
years at the end of their second or third year in medical school to 
become candidates for either M.S. or Ph.D. in one of the basic medical 
sciences. Before entering the combined program, students must meet 
the requirements for admission to the Graduate School and be accept- 
able to the department of their choice as a candidate for an advanced 
degree. 

13 



1 zl Internships and Residencies 
Internships and Residencies 



University Hospital offers the following graduate specialty training 
programs for interns and residents. These programs are approved 
by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals. 

University Hospital participates in the National Intern Matching Pro- 
gram to fill its 30 approved intern positions. The program in- 
cludes rotating internships; straight internships in medicine, 
surgery, pediatrics and pathology; and mixed internships in medi- 
cine, surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology. 

Approved residency programs are offered in the following specialty 

areas: 

Department of Medicine: Internal Medicine, Dermatology 

Department of Surgery: General Surgery, Neurological Surgery, 
Orthopedic Surgery, Thoracic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Ur- 
ology 

Department of Pediatrics: Pediatrics 

Department of Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry 

Department of Anesthesiology: Anesthesiology 

Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology: Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Department of Pathology: Pathology 

Department of Radiology: Radiology 

Department of Neurology: Neurology 

Department of Preventive Medicine: Physical Medicine and 
Rehabilitation 

Department of Ophthalmology: Ophthalmology 
In total, approximately 225 resident positions are offered. 

Appointments to intern and resident positions are made by the 
Director of the Hospital upon the recommendations of the House Staff 
Committee of the Medical Board or, in the case of residents, upon 
the recommendations of the appropriate Clinical Department Head. 
Correspondence and applications should be addressed to: 

THE DIRECTOR 

University Hospital 
Redwood and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Additional Educational Programs 

Research training in international health is accomplished through 
the mechanism of a Research Associate program under the Institute 
of International Medicine. This program provides for post-doctoral 
training in research on a broad spectrum of health problems of de- 
veloping nations. 



Tuition, Fees and Registration 



Current Fees 



Application Fee $ 7.50 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) 10.00 

Tuition — Resident of Maryland 650.00 

Tuition — Non-Residents 900.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Student Activities Fee 23.50 

Student Health Fee 10.00 

♦Student Union Fee 30.00 

♦♦Special Fee 10.00 

National Board Examination Fee 

(2nd and 4th year students) 10.00 

♦♦♦Hospital Insurance (Blue Cross — Individual Plan) .... 58.80 

—Family Plan) 135.60 

The application fee should be submitted with the formal applica- 
tion to medical school. A matriculation fee of $10 and a deposit on 
tuition of $50 is required of all applicants before the expiration date 
specified in the offer of acceptance. The deposit on tuition will be 
credited against first semester charges. In the event of withdrawal 
before registration the matriculation fee will be retained, and the ad- 
vanced deposit will be returned on request, if requested before March 1 . 



Registration 

For the fall semester, all students, after proper certification, are re- 
quested to complete a set of registration cards to be obtained from the 
Registrar's Office. All students are expected to complete their regis- 
tration, including the payment of bills on the registration days. Those 



* The Student Union Fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. 

** The Special Fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to finance equipment for the Union 
Building. 

*** Membership of the student in Blue Cross or any other acceptable hospital 
insurance is required. Each student must produce certified proof of such membership 
at the time of registration. Rates are subject to change. 

15 



16 



Fees & Funds 



who do not complete their registration on the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $20.00. 

One-half of the tuition fee and all of the following — the laboratory 
fee, the student health fee, the student union fee, the National Board 
Examination fee, the special fee, and the student activities fee are pay- 
able on the date specified for registration for the first semester. Blue 
Cross Hospitalization for six months in advance is paid at the begin- 
ning of each semester. 

The remainder of the tuition fee shall be paid on the date designated 
for the payment of fees for the second semester. Fourth year students 
shall pay the graduation fee, in addition, at this time. 



Non-Payment of Fees 

If semester fees are not paid in full on the specified registration dates, 
a penalty of $20.00 will be added. 

If a satisfactory settlement or an agreement for settlement is not 
made with the business office within ten days after a payment is due, 
the student automatically is debarred from attendance at classes and 
will forfeit the other privileges of the School of Medicine. 



Re-Examination Fee 

A student who is eligible for re-examinations must secure a bill in the 
amount of $5.00 from the Registrar's Office and make payment to the 
Cashier for each subject in which he is to be examined, and he must 
present the receipt to the faculty member giving the examination before 
he will be permitted to take the examination. 



Student Activities Fund 

This fund supports all student activities and is budgeted by the Stu- 
dent Council in accordance with its own by-laws. All expenditures 
from this fund must be approved by the Student Council. The fund 
supports the student recreational and social program, representation at 
national conventions for certain student organizations, the cost of 
membership in the National Internship Association as well as other 
activities. A portion of the fund is allocated to the yearbook and pro- 
vides each medical student with a copy of this publication. On registra- 
tion all students are given a copy of The Student Handbook containing 
The Honor Code and The By-Laws of the Honor Council together with 
the By-Laws of the Student Council and the Professional School Stu- 
dent Senate. 



Refunds 1 H 

Withdrawals and Refunds 

Students desiring to leave the School of Medicine at any time during 
the academic year are required to file with the Dean a letter of resigna- 
tion. The student must satisfy the authorities that he has no out- 
standing obligations to the school and must return his Student Identity 
Card and Matriculation Card. 

If these procedures are not completed, the student will not be 
entitled to honorable dismissal nor to refund of fees. 

Students under 21 years of age must supplement the procedures 
previously described with the written consent of their parents or 
guardians. 

ACADEMIC STANDING ON WITHDRAWAL 

Students who voluntarily withdraw during an academic semester will 
be given no credit. 

Students are not permitted to resort to withdrawal in order to pre- 
clude current or impending failures. Their standing on withdrawal will 
be recorded in the Registrar's Office. 

Students who withdraw from the School of Medicine, and later de- 
sire readmission, must apply to the Committee on Admissions, unless 
other arrangements have been consumated with the Dean's written 
consent. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

Students who are eligible to honorable dismissal will receive a refund 
of current charges, after the matriculation fee has been deducted, 
according to the following schedule: 

PERIODS ELAPSED AFTER INSTRUCTION BEGINS 

PERCENTAGE 
REFUNDABLE 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

After five weeks 

Leave of Absence 

Students who are in good standing may be granted one year's leave 
of absence on request to the Dean. Longer leaves can be arranged only 
under special circumstances except those students in the combined 
M.D.-Ph.D. program. 



Required Equipment 



At the beginning of the first year, all freshmen must possess a com- 
plete set of dissecting instruments similar to the one on display in the 
bookstore. In addition, they must provide themselves with microscopes 
equipped with a mechanical stage and a substage lamp. Microscopes 
must meet the standards described below. 

A standard monocular or binocular microscope made by Bausch & 
Lomb, Leitz, Zeiss, Reichert, or American Optical Company fitted with 
the following attachments, meets the requirements: 

16 mm., lOx, 0.25 N.A. — 4.9 mm. working distance. 
4 mm., 43x, 0.65 N.A. — 0.6 mm. working distance. 
1.8 mm., 97x, oil immersion, 1.25 N.A. — 0.13 mm. working distance. 
Oculars: lOx and 5x. Huygenian eyepieces. 
A scanning objective is optional, but often proves to be of great value. 

The microscope should also be equipped with a wide aperture 
stage with detachable ungraduated mechanical stage, a substage con- 
denser, variable focusing type 1.25 N.A. with iris diaphragm (a rack 
and pinion focusing device is preferred), and a mirror which is plane 
on one side, and concave on the other. A carrying case is recom- 
mended. 

Students are cautioned with respect to the purchase of used or odd- 
lot microscopes since some older instruments are in poor optical or 
mechanical condition, and in addition to which some were equipped 
with a 4 mm. (high dry) objective whose N.A. is marked as 0.85. 
This objective has such a short working distance (0.3 mm.) that it is 
difficult or impossible to focus through thick cover glasses or the 
standard hemocytometer cover glass without breakage. All microscopes 
(new and used) are subject to inspection and approval by Dr. Theo- 
dore F. Leveque, 208 Bressler Research Building, and Dr. Andrew 
G. Smith, 326 Howard Hall. Such approval must be obtained, at the 
latest, two days before school opens. 



18 



Required Equipment 1 Q 

Prior to beginning the second semester of the first year, each student 
should obtain a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, and ophthalmoscope- 
otoscope. The Department of Physiology and the Division of Physical 
Diagnosis offers the following recommendations: 



INSTRUMENT 

Stethoscope 



RECOMMENDED TYPE 

Reiger-Bowles or 
Sprague-Bowles 



Sphygmomanometer Tycos-aneroid 



Ophthalmoscope- 
otoscope 



Welch-Allyn 



COMMENT 

Purchase thick-walled rubber tub- 
ing. The wall thickness and inter- 
nal diameter should be x /& inch 
each. Consult with Faculty Mem- 
ber before purchasing a more ex- 
pensive stethoscope. 

Other types are also satisfactory 
but. this has proved itself for all 
around reliability and durability. 

With closed No. 201 (diagnostic) 
otoscope head and No. 106 May 
ophthalmoscope head (not deluxe) 
Medium handle No. 705. 



In addition to the dissecting kit each student will require one or two 
5/ 2 inch curved Kelley clamps for use in the Physiology Laboratory. 

The following equipment, which is frequently sold in a packaged 
kit with the above instruments, will be needed for second year work 
in Physical Diagnosis. 



Tuning fork 



Reflex hammer 



250 cycles 
per second 

any simple type 



The large alumnium alloy type is 
preferred to the small stainless 
steel variety. 

Avoid specialized instruments with 
built in pins, brushes, etc. 



Students in the second year class are also expected to provide them- 
selves with short white lapel coats. Three button, 8 ounce sanforized 
duck coats are satisfactory. 



Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships 
and Loan Funds 



If an applicant is awarded a scholarship it is understood that during 
its tenure he will accept no appointment in a hospital unless it has an 
approved graduate educational program. 



Prizes 



THE FACULTY PRIZE 



The faculty will award the Faculty Gold Medal and Certificate and 
five Certificates of Honor to the six highest ranking candidates for grad- 
uation who, during the four academic years, have exhibited outstanding 
qualifications for the practice of medicine. 



THE BALDER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Each year a prize of $500 will be awarded for outstanding academic 
achievement to a graduating senior. 

THE PRIZE IN INTERNAL MEDICINE 

Each year a prize of $600 will be awarded through the generosity of 
an anonymous donor to a graduating senior for excellence in internal 
medicine. 

THE DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a 
memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student in the 
fourth year class doing the best work in genito-urinary surgery. 

THE DR. LEONARD M. HUMMEL MEMORIAL AWARD 

A gold medal and certificate of proficiency will be awarded annually 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Leonard H. Hummel, to the graduate 
selected by the Executive Committee of the faculty who has manifested 
oustanding qualifications in internal medicine. 

THE DR. HARRY M. ROBINSON, SR., PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year in honor of Dr. Harry M. 
Robinson, Sr., Professor Emeritus of Dermatology, to the member of 
the fourth year class selected by the faculty who has done outstanding 
work in dermatology. 



20 



Scholarships 2 1 



THE DR. WAYNE W. BABCOCK PRIZE 



Each year a prize of $50 will be awarded to a graduating senior for 
outstanding work in surgery as a memorial to Dr. Wayne W. Babcock. 

THE EDUARD UHLENHUTH AWARD 

This award consists of a specially selected skull given each year to 
the member of the sophomore class who has done the best work in first 
year anatomy as well as in clinical anatomy. The skull is on a base 
with a silver plaque giving the name of the award. 

Scholarships 

A number of scholarships are available to members of the three 
upper classes with stipends ranging from $100 to $1000 a year with the 
average about $250. Specific information on any of .these is available 
on inquiry to Room 102, Davidge Hall, All scholarships are awarded 
for one academic year and will be renewed only on application. Appli- 
cations may be obtained in Room 102, Davidge Hall, and should be 
returned before the end of the school year. They will be acted upon 
by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships and Loans shortly thereafter 
and the applicants notified of the decision as promptly as possible. 
Awards are made on a competitive basis and academic proficiency is 
the primary consideration. Students who do not qualify for scholar- 
ships may apply for a student loan. 

Warfield Freshman Merit Scholarships 

Scholarships with a stipend of $650 are available to members of the 
first year class who are residents of Maryland and who have demon- 
strated outstanding potentiality for the study of medicine. Selection will 
be based on the applicant's college record, MCAT scores, and any 
other criteria available to the Committee, including their impression of 
the applicant at the time he was interviewed in connection with his 
application for admission to Medical School. The Committee reserves 
the right to withhold Scholarship awards if, in their opinion, there are 
no qualified applicants in the particular year under consideration. Indi- 
viduals meeting the residency requirements may apply by writing to 
the Committee on Admissions after they receive an offer of a place in 
the incoming class, requesting that their name be given consideration. 
These scholarships are available to first year students only, and there- 
fore are not renewable. Recipients may apply in later years for Medical 
School Scholarships open to upper classmen. 

Avalon Scholarship 

An Avalon Scholarship which will pay full tuition will be awarded 
to the member of the incoming freshman class who shows the greatest 
promise for a successful career in medicine. All accepted students are 
eligible to apply whether resident or non-resident. At the end of each 



22 Scholarships, Fellowships & Loan Funds 

academic year the recipient's record will be reviewed by the Committee 
on Scholarships and the scholarship extended for another year if the 
record warrants. Any recipient who does not stand at least in the upper 
third of the class will not be considered eligible for renewal. 

If an applicant is awarded an Avalon Scholarship, it is understood 
that during its tenure he will accept no outside remunerative employ- 
ment during the school year. 

Dr. Michael Vinceguerra Scholarship 

The estate of Dr. Michael Vinceguerra has established a scholar- 
ship fund. The number of scholarships and stipend of each will be 
determined by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships and Loans. 

The McCormick Scholarship 

Through the generosity of the McCormick Company, a scholarship, 
providing a stipend of $1200 per year, is available to a student of the 
first or second year of Medical School. These scholarships will be 
awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Loans, taking into 
consideration the need of the applicant and his scholarly attainments. 

Traits of character, motivation, and potentiality as a physician will 
be considered by the Committee in making an award. All McCormick 
scholars must agree to accept no outside employment of any kind dur- 
ing its tenure. The scholarship is renewable at the discretion of the 
Committee providing the holder stands in the upper third of his class 
at the time of application. 

The Dr. John B. Weaver Fellowships 

The will of Dr. John B. Weaver, who died in 1929, authorized The 
Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland to 
establish fellowships in his name. Two such fellowships, each in the 
amount of $1500. will be awarded annually to applicants who as 
physicians are full time fellows in research or teaching in the University 
of Maryland School of Medicine. 

Summer Research Fellowships 

A number of summer research fellowships are available upon appli- 
cation to the Committee on Scholarships and Loans. 

Loan Funds 

A number of loan funds are available to students who are in financial 
need and application may be made at any time, although most applica- 
tions are made and considered shortly before the beginning of each 
semester. Except in unusual circumstances, loans from Medical School 
Funds are limited to $400 a year. Loans are awarded on the basis of 
need and therefore a budget must be submitted with each application, 



Loan Funds OQ 

along with the other supporting data. Most loans are repayable with 
interest at 2% in partial installments of 20% each, beginning two years 
after graduation. Interest with principal of the loan as repaid will be 
used as a rotating loan fund. Application forms for all loans are avail- 
able in Room 102, Davidge Hall and should be presented to Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Loans. 

Health Professions Student Loan Program 

Financial assistance is available to all students from the Health 
Professions Student Loan Program. Preference, however, will be given 
to incoming freshman. Borrowings are made to $2000 a year and re- 
payable over a ten year period, beginning three years after graduation. 
No interest is charged on the loans until the beginning of the repayable 
period, when interest will be charged at the current federal rate which 
is usually between 3 and 4% . Application forms will be sent on request 
or may be obtained in person from Room 102, Davidge Hall, and 
should be filed before June 15 preceding the school year. 

AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION LOANS 

The American Medical Association will guarantee loans up to $1500 
per year to medical students with interest at 1% above the Chicago 
prime rate. Loans mature on first day of fifth month after completing 
training including internship and residency. There will be additional 
1% interest charged on unpaid balance after maturity. Application 
forms and further information are available in Room 102, Davidge Hall. 

STUDENT COUNCIL EMERGENCY LOAN FUND 

The Student Council of the Medical School has established an emer- 
gency loan fund for all medical students. When funds are available 
loans are without interest, are limited to $400, and must be repaid in 
120 days. 



General Information 



Student Organizations 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

This committee serves to coordinate and integrate the activities of all 
student groups and to act as liaison between the student body and the 
faculty. Student members are: President of the Student Council, Class 
Presidents, Chairman of the Honor Council, President of the Student 
American Medical Association, President of the Interfraternity Council, 
President of Alpha Omega Alpha, President of the Woman's Auxiliary 
to Student American Medical Association, Editor of the Yearbook, 
Editor of the S A MA Newsletter, Chairman of the Orientation Com- 
mittee. The Associate Dean for Student Affairs serves as Chairman 
and faculty members are appointed by the Dean. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

Each year the student body elects the Student Council which formu- 
lates and directs policies and activities of the student body and makes 
appropriate recommendations to the proper authorities. It is respon- 
sible for disbursement of the Student Activities Fund and arranges the 
social program for the year. 

HONOR COUNCIL 

The Honor Council is responsible for interpretation and execution of 
the Honor Code. Acceptance of the provisions and obligations of this 
code is required of all students entering the medical school. 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL SENATE 

The Professional Schools on the Baltimore Campus, including the 
Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Nursing, and Pharmacology 
formed a Professional School Senate in 1956, a representative body for 
the purpose of considering problems concerning these schools and pre- 
senting their recommendations to the proper University authorities. 
The Professional School Senate operates under its own By-Laws. 

24 



General Information 25 



STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Student American Medical Association has a Chapter at Mary- 
land and all medical students are eligible to join. This organization is 
designed to prepare the future physician for full participation in organ- 
ized medicine. The S A M A Newsletter is a monthly publication which 
covers medical school news and the latest developments in areas of 
vital concern to medical students. 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY, STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

It was organized to help wives of medical students to prepare them- 
selves to fulfill future responsibilities as wives of practicing physicians. 
It has promoted closer association among the wives and the Auxiliary 
actively participates in many functions for the betterment of the medical 
school. 

STUDENT COUNCIL INTRAMURAL ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

Each year the Student Council sponsors an intramural athletic pro- 
gram which is designed to provide for the student a physical outlet from 
the stresses of constant study. The program consists of inter-class 
competition in tag football, basketball, softball, and tennis. 

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

Its purpose is to further the interests and improve the coordination 
and cooperation of the member groups. Each fraternity is represented 
by its president and social chairman. One of these representatives is 
chosen President for the school year on a rotating basis. 

The Interfraternity Council organizes the Freshman Orientation Pro- 
gram, operates a used book and microscope store, and sponsors a yearly 
lectureship. The Interfraternity Council is represented on the Student 
Activities Committee. 

THE YEARBOOK 

This is the annual joint publication of the Schools of Medicine and 
Nursing. The yearbook, Terra Mariae Medicus, covers all the facets 
of student activities and is compiled by the students. As Bones, Molars 
and Briefs, the yearbook provides a continuous record of graduating 
classes as far back as 1896. It is the outstanding record of student life. 
The cost of the yearbook is included in the Student Activities Fee and 
all medical students are entitled to receive a copy without further 
charge. 

Medical Historical Society 

This organization is open to all intersted medical students, house 
staff, and faculty. Meetings are held throughout the year in which 
members or guest lecturers present papers in selected areas of medical 
history. 






us. - 






A common meeting place for students is the new Baltimore Union Building at 
621 West Lombard Street. The new six story building, dedicated April 21, 1961, 
cost $1.5 million. Future plans call for doubling its size. 



General Information 27 



Alpha Omega Alpha — National Medical Society 

The Beta Chapter of Maryland was established at the University of 
Maryland in 1949. Medical students possessing outstanding quali- 
ties of moral integrity, scholarship, and leadership are elected to mem- 
bership in their third or fourth years. The society sponsors an annual 
lectureship and forum for presentation of medical student research. 

Student Health Service 

James R. Karns, m.d. Director, Student Health Service 

The Medical School has made provision for the systemic care of 
undergraduate medical students according to the following plan: 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 

All new students will be examined during the first week of the semes- 
ter. Notice of the date, time, and place of the examination will be 
announced to the classes and posted on the bulletin board. The passing 
of this physical examination is necessary before final acceptance of any 
student. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

Students in need of medical attention will be seen by the Director, 
Dr. James R. Karns, in his office on the second floor, Outpatient 
Department at 12 p.m. daily, except Saturday and Sunday. In case of 
necessity, students will be seen at their homes. 

HOSPITALIZATION 

All students are required to have Blue Cross hospitalization insur- 
ance, or its equivalent. 

PHYSICAL DEFECTS 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering school in order to prevent loss of time which 
later correction might incur. 

LIMITATIONS 

It is not the function of this service to treat chronic conditions con- 
tracted by the students before admission, nor to extend treatment of 
acute conditions arising in the period between academic years, unless 
the school physician recommends this service. 

Housing 

The Baltimore Union Building for students of the Professional 
Schools is located adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West 
Lombard Street. Accommodations for 195 men are provided in a 
five-story, semi-air conditioned building which also contains a cafe- 



9Q General Information 

teria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facilities, game room, 
bookstore, tobacco shop, and barber shop; there are lounges on each 
floor. Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made for 
rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The con- 
tract for accommodations covers the academic year. The rates are: 

$160.00 per semester per double room. 

80.00 per eight weeks summer session per double room. 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 
Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, 
bookshelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair, and desk lamp. Maid 
service will include cleaning of room twice per week and replacement 
of change of linen once each week. Telephone service is available 
through the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company. Cost of the 
telephone is not included in the room rate. Information can be ob- 
tained from the Director's Office. Mail service is also provided. Towels 
and linens must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental 
Service. Residents may either provide their own pillow and blankets 
or rent them from the linen service. A small amount of luggage space 
is available. Storage of anything other than luggage will not be 
available. 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union Building 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

There are no University housing facilities in Baltimore available for 
women. 

Diplomas 

Members of the Senior Class must fill out an "Application for Di- 
ploma Form." Please use a ball-point pen in order that the carbon 
copies may be legible. 

Commencement 

All graduating seniors are required to attend the Pre-commence- 
ment and Commencement ceremonies unless excused in writing by the 
Dean. 



Buildings and Facilities 



Davidge Hall 

This hall, at 522 West Lombard Street, is named after the first dean, 
Dr. John Beale Davidge, and was the first building of the medical school 
to be erected. It was completed in 1812 and is a replica of the Pantheon 
in Rome. It is the oldest structure in this country from which the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine has been granted annually since its erection. 
It is located at the N.E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets and 
houses the offices of the Dean, and his staff, the Committee on Ad- 
missions, the Postgraduate Committee, Medical Alumni Office, in addi- 
tion to Chemical and Anatomical Halls. 

Administration Building 

520 West Lombard Street contains the Baltimore offices of the Regis- 
trar and two lecture halls. 

Bressler Research Laboratory 

The Frank C. Bressler Research Laboratory at 29 S. Greene Street, 
a memorial to a generous alumnus, was completed in 1940. 

It houses the Department of Anatomy in addition to the research 
facilities of the departments of Medicine and Surgery, animal quarters, 
the Bressler Memorial Room, and the Baltimore Offices of the Board 
of Regents and the President of the University. 

Howard Hall 

660 West Redwood Street houses the Departments of Biochemistry, 
Biophysics, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Physiology, 
in addition to the Central Animal Quarters of the Medical School. 

Medical Technology Building 

31 South Greene Street houses some of the offices and laboratories 

29 



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University Hospital QQ 

of the departments of Pathology as well as investigative laboratories of 
the Clinical Departments. 

University Hospital 

University Hospital is part of the University of Maryland. It is one 
of the oldest institutions for the care of the sick in the State of Mary- 
land. It was opened in September 1823, under the name of the Balti- 
more Infirmary and at that time consisted of only four wards, one of 
which was reserved for patients with diseases of the eye. 

In 1933-1934 the present University Hospital was erected with a 
capacity of 435 beds and 65 bassinets. In 1952-1953 a modern Psy- 
chiatric Institute Building was erected and a junctional wing was added 
to the general hospital. New additions have increased the hospital bed 
capacity to 667 beds and 70 bassinets devoted to general medicine, 
surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and the various medical and 
surgical specialties. Three hundred and seventy are for ward patients. 

The hospital buildings are situated opposite the Medical School 
buildings. The students, therefore, are in close proximity to the clinical 
facilities of the University Hospital. The hospital as planned, makes a 
particularly attractive teaching unit and is the major clinical teaching 
facility of the Medical School. 

EMERGENCY SERVICE 

The Emergency Service of the hospital receives and treats a large 
number of emergency cases because of its proximity to the largest 
manufacturing and shipping districts of the city. During the past fiscal 
year a total of 37,977 patients were treated in the Emergency Room. 

OUT PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

The Out Patient Department is in the old University Hospital. It 
has been remodeled to provide space and facilities for more than fifty 
clinics, the departments of X-ray, a pharmacy, laboratory, and other 
ancillary services. Admission policies are predicated upon the teach- 
ing requirements of the School of Medicine and the ward services of 
the University Hospital. 

Visits to the various clinics of the Out Patient Department during 
the last fiscal year totaled 149,286. 

Health Sciences Library 

The Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, and Social 
Work are served by the Health Sciences Library in a modern, four 
story library building completed in 1960. The oldest part of the li- 
brary collection dates back to 1813 when the University of Maryland 
purchased the books of Dr. John Crawford to form a medical library. 
The present library contains about 100,000 bound volumes and 
regularly receives over 2,200 scientific periodicals. 



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QA Health Sciences Library, Personnel 

The library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and 
the Welch Medical Library are open to students of the School of Medi- 
cine without charge. Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody 
Library and the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

PERSONNEL 

Howard rovelstad, a.b., m.a., b.s.l.s. — Director of Libraries and 
Professor of Library Science 
*ida marian robinson, a.b., b.s.l.s. — Librarian Emeritus 
*hilda e. moore, a.b., a.b.l.s. — Librarian and Associate Professor 
of Library Science 

sarah L. atkins — Cataloging Assistant 

*edith M. coyle, a.b., a.b.l.s., m.a. — Head, Serials Department 
*elizabeth a. forney, a.b., m.s.l.s. — Reference Librarian 

willard t. frampton — Library Clerk 

norma E. handy — Acquisitions Assistant 

ruth E. hanna, a.b., m.s.l.s. — Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 

Lorraine s. hlavin — Serials Assistant 
* simon e c. hurst — Head, Circulation Department 

MARGARET M. JONES, A.B., M.S.L.S. Cataloger 

CHOONG HAN KIM, A.B., M.A.L.S., PH.D. Cataloger 

hans-guenther r. listfeldt, b.s., m.s.l.s. — Assistant Serials 

Librarian 
*beatrice Marriott, b.a. — Reference Librarian 
*eleanor M. mitten, b.s., b.s.l.s. — Head, Book Acquisitions and 
Cataloging 

Elizabeth palmer — Secretary to the Librarian 

lorene s. pita, a.b., m.a.l.s. — Reference Librarian 

R. kae sarubin — Circulation Assistant 

elwood sterling — Library Clerk 

Martha L. sullivan — Cataloging Assistant 

lenore a. varuola — Serials Assistant 



* Certified Medical Librarian. 



Affiliated Institutions 



Mercy Hospital 

Mercy Hospital traces its history to the foundation of the Washing- 
ton School of Medicine in 1824. In 1872 some of the members of this 
institution founded a new school, which was the beginning of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore. 

Washington School of Medicine opened a dispensary and a small 
hospital at the corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets and named it 
the Baltimore City Hospital. This building served both as a hospital 
and a medical school. In 1874 the Sisters of Mercy, upon the invita- 
tion of Washington School of Medicine, assumed responsibility for 
the Nursing Services of the hospital. In 1876, Washington University 
merged with the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

In 1888 the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, began construction of a new 
hospital adjacent to the earlier buildings. In 1909, the name of the 
institution was changed to "Mercy Hospital." 

Many additions have been made to the physical plant over the years. 
The present twenty-one story, modern hospital building opened in 
1963. A new gastroenterological research laboratory was completed 
in 1965. A center for gastrointestinal endoscopy has also been es- 
tablished. 

The hospital is very active in the teaching program of the medical 
school. Faculty members serve as fulltime heads of medicine, surgery, 
and pediatrics. Medical students rotate through the Mercy Hospital 
clinical services during the second, third, and fourth years. 

During the year ended December 31, 1964, there were 12,802 
general admissions, 25.906 dispensary visits, 2,271 obstetrical de- 
liveries, and 19,876 emergency visits in the Accident Department. 

The bed capacity is 339 plus 48 bassinets. All hospital beds are 

37 







Ill I i . i | 

rvlllii i 



Mercy Hospital 



Affiliated Institutions QQ 

available for teaching purposes, 77 of them specifically as service beds. 
A School of Nursing, a School of Medical Technology, and a School 
of X-Ray Technology are conducted in conjunction with the hospital. 



The James Lawrence Kernan Hospital and Industrial School of Maryland 
for Crippled Children 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Dickeyville. 
The site is within the northwestern city limits and of easy access to 
the city proper. 

Its facilities are used to teach pediatric orthopedics to medical stu- 
dents and house officers. 

A hospital unit, complete in every respect, offers all modern facili- 
ties for the care of an orthopedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 114 beds — endowed, and city and 
state supported. The orthopedic dispensary at the University Hospi- 
tal is maintained in closest affiliation and cares for the cases dis- 
charged from the Kernan Hospital. The Physical Therapy Depart- 
ment is very well equipped with modern apparatus and trained per- 
sonnel. Occupational therapy has been fully established and developed 
under trained technicians. 



Baltimore City Hospitals 

This is the only municipal hospital and has a bed capacity of 2,063. 
The departments of the hospital are: Anesthesiology, Chronic and 
Community Medicine, Dentistry, Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
Pathology, Pediatrics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Psychia- 
try, Radiology, Surgery, and Tuberculosis. 

The acute hospital has 425 beds and is devoted to the usual medical 
activities. The chronic hospitals, where physical rehabilitation is em- 
phasized on all patients, are devoted to chronic and degenerative dis- 
eases, as well as tuberculosis. 

There is a strong affiliation between the School of Medicine and 
the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Anesthesiology, Ra- 
diology, and Medicine. The heads of these departments as well as 
the clinical instructors are members of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine faculty. They participate not only in teaching 
medical students, but are active in the planned programs for house 
staff education. The practical teaching of Obstetrics is carried out 
in this institution, while partial instruction in several areas of Medicine 
and Anesthesiology are under the directorship of the respective clinical 
department heads. 



Af) Affiliated Institutions 

Maryland General Hospital 

The Maryland General Hospital began humbly about 1883 at a 
location on Linden Avenue, north of Madison Street, with a capacity 
of 50 beds. Five years later, a college building (The Baltimore Medi- 
cal College), was erected on Madison Street and a maternity service 
known as The Maryland-Lying-in Hospital opened on Linden Avenue 
contiguous to the main building. Three years later the Dental Build- 
ing followed. 

Early in 1911 came a radical change. The Baltimore Medical Col- 
lege, including its College of Dentistry, was consolidated with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. This left portions of two buildings tenantless and 
functionless. Then came three Methodist groups, federating their 
purses and courage in purchasing and operating a hospital. 

Two campaigns for funds, two years apart, met a heartening 
response from people of all faiths. Debts were extinguished and 
mortgage bonds retired. Property improvements began on a large 
scale. Both buildings were soundly converted to hospital uses. 

In 1921 a successful campaign was completed to construct a mod- 
ern nurses' home. 

In July, 1954, a contract was entered into for the creation of a 
seven story building — the first phase of the building program — and 
was dedicated in December, 1956. The new building made possible 
the demolition of the old buildings. The second phase of the program 
was completed in November, 1962. 

The present bed complement is 385 plus 40 bassinets. In addition 
to increasing the bed capacity, construction of modern laboratories, 
recovery room, surgery, and X-ray departments, the new departments 
of an intensive care unit, a radio-isotope laboratory, and cardio-pul- 
monary function laboratories were incorporated into this facility. 

For the year 1964 there were 13,930 admissions, 7,475 surgical 
procedures, and 2,261 obstetrical deliveries. 

An early merger is contemplated with the Baltimore Eye, Ear and 
Throat Hospital, with the construction of a modern seven story build- 
ing to accommodate these patients. The bed complement, upon com- 
pletion, will be 457. 



Eye Research Foundation of Bethesda 

The Eye Research Foundation is affiliated with the Department of 
Ophthalmology, and is located at 8710 Old Georgetown Road in 
Bethesda. Research and clinical facilities are used for research and 
training programs. 



Historical Sketch 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland, the fifth medi- 
cal school to be founded in the United States, filled a great need for such 
an institution in the Baltimore area. On December 18, 1807, the General 
Assembly of the State of Maryland passed "An Act for Founding a Medi- 
cal College in the City or Precincts of Baltimore for the Instruction of 
Students in the Different Branches of Medicine." The philosophy of the 
founding fathers and the principles upon which the school was established 
have not changed. This is aptly expressed in the opening paragraphs of 
the Founding Act: "WHEREAS ... it appears to the General Assembly 
that many benefits would accrue, not only to the State of Maryland but to 
many other parts of the United States, from the establishment of a seminary 
for the promotion of medical knowledge in the City of Baltimore, there- 
fore, Be It Enacted . . . That a College ... by the name of The College 
of Medicine of Maryland, be established . . . upon the following funda- 
mental principles. . . . The said College shall be founded and maintained 
forever upon a most liberal plan, for the benefit of students of every coun- 
try and every religious denomination, who shall be freely admitted to equal 
privileges and advantages of education, and to all the honors of the College, 
according to their merit, without requiring or enforcing any religious or 
civil tests." 

The direction of the College of Medicine was vested in a Board known 
as "The Regents of the College" comprising the Board of Medical Exam- 
iners, the President, and Professors of the College. 

Dr. John Beale Davidge was selected as the first dean of the school. 
Under his farsighted leadership the original faculty formulated a new con- 
cept of medical education: "The science of medicine could not be success- 
fully taught under the usual organization of medical schools; that without 
the aids of physiology and pathology, either associated with anatomy or 
as a separate chair of institutes, the philosophy of the body in sickness or 
in health could not be understood." 

The first session of the College was not complete and lectures were 
delivered in the homes of Dr. Davidge, other members of the faculty, and 
at the Almshouse. From the beginning the School was fortunate in having 
patients at the Almshouse for use in bedside teaching. 

The first recorded public graduation was in 1810 with five graduates 
listed, three from Maryland and two from Virginia. 

41 



42 Historical Sketch 

At the end of 1807 there was, in Baltimore, a medical college with 
officers and faculty but no buildings or money. A lottery was authorized 
in the amount of $10,000, which was subsequently increased to $40,000. 
The faculty contributed what it could and interested citizens helped to raise 
funds with which to begin the school and provide for its maintenance. 

The location selected for the College of Medicine was the northeast 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets on property owned by Col. John 
Eager Howard of Revolutionary War fame. Mr. R. Cary Long, an eminent 
architect, drew plans for the beautiful replica of the Pantheon which stands 
today and houses the two old amphitheatres, the offices of the Dean, the 
Alumni Association, Postgraduate Committee, and other administrative 
offices. This building was first occupied late in the year of 1812. It is the 
oldest building in this country from which the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
has been granted annually since its erection. In this building one of the 
first medical school libraries in the United States was founded. 

The Faculty and Regents endeavored constantly to improve the cur- 
riculum and teaching facilities. New faculty members were secured and 
new methods were introduced in the school. Dr. John Crawford, one of the 
new faculty members, vaccinated Baltimoreans against smallpox during 
1800, while Dr. Waterhouse was doing the same for citizens of Boston. As 
early as 1810 he presented evidence that tuberculosis was contagious. His 
personal library became the nucleus of the present Medical School Library. 

In 1812 the General Assembly authorized founding of the additional 
Schools of Law, Divinity, and Arts and Sciences. The University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine was unique in the history of education, since the 
medical school preceded the undergraduate and other professional schools. 

The Baltimore Infirmary, the forerunner of the University Hospital, 
was built in 1823. The School was one of the first to have its own hospital 
for clinical instruction, and it was here that intramural residency for senior 
students was first established. 

There were many "firsts" through the years. The study of human anat- 
omy was recognized as basic for the acquisition of medical knowledge, but 
dissection was limited by the difficulty in obtaining bodies. The trustees 
recommended compulsory dissection as early as 1833, but the faculty did 
not enforce the recommendation until 1848, the first medical school in the 
country with such a requirement. Finally, enactment of the Anatomy Law 
provided unclaimed bodies to the medical schools for dissection (1882). 
At the College of Medicine of Maryland instruction was given in Dentistry 
(1837) and in the techniques of ausculation and percussion (1841) for the 
first time in America. In 1844 Dr. David Stewart, the first professor of 
pharmacy in the United States, initiated his lectures at the School, and 
compulsory courses in Experimental Physiology and Microscopy were in- 
troduced in 1854. The first independent chairs for teaching Diseases of 
Women and Children (1867) and Diseases of the Eye and Ear (1873) 
were established. Systematic clinical instruction in Nervous Diseases was 
instituted in 1869. 

The Faculty and Regents recognized the need for medical education to 



Historical Sketch /I Q 

include areas other than the sciences. In 1891 a rule was adopted which 
required each student to complete successfully a preliminary examination 
in English before being admitted. 

At the time of the charter the course of instruction was only four 
months. In 1848 it was increased to four and a half months and attendance 
at two sessions was required. In 1891 the period of instruction was in- 
creased to three years and in 1896 all Doctor of Medicine candidates were 
required to complete a four year course of instruction. 

Graduate programs were offered as early as 1860 and a special ten 
weeks summer course was given in 1 870. These were the initial Postgradu- 
ate courses which have continued to the current era. 

Honorary degrees have been conferred upon outstanding persons on 
rare occasions. The honorary M.D. degree conferred upon Dr. Ephraim 
McDowell by the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1 825 was 
his only degree. The Marquis de Lafayette was awarded the honorary 
degree of LL.D. during his visit to America in 1824. 

The University of Maryland School of Medicine enjoys a rich heritage 
bequeathed by two other medical schools and their affiliated hospitals. 
Mergers with the Baltimore Medical College in 1913 and the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons in 1915 provided the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine with greatly expanded faculty and clinical facilities. 

The state University was established in 1920 when the professional 
schools in Baltimore merged with the Maryland State College of Agricul- 
ture at College Park, Maryland. The state of Maryland assumed the finan- 
cial obligation of all of the schools. 

Throughout the many years since the Medical School's founding the 
prime emphasis has been placed on fitting men and women for the practice 
of medicine. Significant research contributions were made by many gradu- 
ates although systematic programs of experimentation received greater 
emphasis in the later years, especially since the erection of the Bressler 
Research Laboratory in 1939-1940. 

Women first entered the Medical School in 1921. There were six 
women in the 1922 class, two of whom completed the four year course of 
study. The School was integrated racially almost from the beginning and 
students of most races have completed the course of study and graduated. 



Administration 



BOARD OF REGENTS AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 



Chairman Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 

V ice-Chairman Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412, Hartwick 
Building, 4321 Hartwick Road, College Park 

Secretary B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 

Treasurer Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 

Assistant Secretary Louis L. Kaplan 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 

Assistant Treasurer Richard W. Case 

1 Charles Center, Baltimore 

Members Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Boulevard, 
Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 

4101 Greemvay, Baltimore 

William B. Long 

Medical Center, Salisbury 

44 



Officers of Administration ^cr 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



WILSON H. ELKINS, B.A., M.A., LITT.B., D.PHIL. 

President 

ALBIN O. KUHN, B.S., M.S., PH.D. 

Vice President, Baltimore Campuses 

WILLIAM S. STONE, M.S., M.D., D.SC. 

Director, Medical Education and Research, and Dean 

KARL H. WEAVER, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Dean of Admissions 

MITCHELL J. ROSENHOLTZ, B.A., M.D. 

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs 

EUGENE JOSEPH LINBERG, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Dean of Curriculum and Instruction 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, M.S. 

Director of Admission and Registrations 



Faculty Board 



ACADEMIC SESSION 1965-66 

Dr. William S. Stone, Chairman 
Dr. Eugene J. Linberg, Vice Chairman and Secretary 

ELECTED MEMBERS AND ALTERNATES 



Members 
Anatomy 


Alternates 


Term 
Expires 


DR. THEODORE R. LEVEQUE 
DR. VERNON E. KRAHL 


DR. JOSEPH WELLS 
DR. CHARLES G. 


1966 




CRISPENS, JR. 


1967 


Anesthesiology 






DR. NORMAN B. HOLLINGSWORTH 


DR. MARTIN I. GOLD 


1965 


Biological Chemistry 






DR. ARTHUR J. EMERY, JR. 


VACANT 


1965 


Biophysics 






DR. R. A. SJODIN 


DR. M. D. STERN 


1966 



Medicine 



DR. EDWARD COTTER 
DR. HOWARD RASKIN 
DR. JAMES KARNS 

Microbiology 

DR. EDWARD ROSENZWEIG 



DR. JOHN WISWELL 
DR. CHARLES SHAW 
DR. LEONARD SCHERLIS 



DR. OLLIE R. EYLAR, JR. 



1965 

1966 
1967 



1967 



Neurology 

VACANT 

Obstetrics-Gynecology 

DR. EDMUND B. MIDDLETON 
DR. HARRY COHEN 



VACANT 



DR. F. X. PAUL TINKER 
DR. I. A. SIEGEL 



1965 

1966 



46 



Faculty Board AH 





Term 


Members 


Alternates Expires 


Ophthalmology 




DR. SAMUEL L. FOX 


DR. OTTO P. 




VAN BIJSTERVELD 1967 


Pathology 




DR. PETER RASMUSSEN 


DR. MITCHELL ROSENHOLTZ 1966 


Pediatrics 




DR. ROBERT S. MOSSER 


DR. A. H. FINKELSTEIN 1965 


DR. P. J. JENSEN 


DR. M. K. GORTEN 1966 


DR. KARL H. WEAVER 


DR. RICHARD L. LONDON 1967 



Pharmacology 

DR. RAYMOND BURGISON 



DR. JOHN J. O'NEILL 



1965 



Physiology 

DR. LEO M. KARPELES 



DR. PAUL D COLEMAN 



1967 



Preventive Medicine 

DR. PAUL RICHARDSON 

Psychiatry 

DR. RUSSELL MONROE 
DR. WALTER WEINTRAUB 
DR. VIRGINIA HUFFER 

Radiology 

DR. DONALD A. WOLFEL 



DR. MAUREEN M. 
HENDERSON 



DR. BENJAMIN POPE 
DR. ROBERT VIDAVER 
DR. FRANCIS T. 
RAFFERTY, JR. 



DR. JAMES A. LYON, JR. 



1966 

1965 
1966 

1967 
1965 



Surgery 



DR. JOHN D. YOUNG 
DR. EUGENE J. LINBERG 
DR. C. THOMAS FLOTTE 



DR. EARL P. GALLEHER 1965 

DR. EVERARD F. COX 1966 
DR. ARLIE R. 

MANSBERGER, JR. 1967 



HOSPITAL MEDICAL BOARD 

dr. Howard b. mays, President 
dr. francis J. borges, Secretary 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

DR. ARTHUR G. SrWINSKI 
DR. FRANK K. MORRIS 



Term 
Expires 

1965 
1965 



1965 
1965 



4*8 De P artme nt Heads 
DEAN'S OFFICE 



dr. william s. stone Dean 

dr. george h. yeager Associate Dean 



DEPARTMENTAL HEADS 



dr. Elijah adams Biological Chemistry 

DR. WILLIAM D. BLAKE Physiology 

vacant Pediatrics 

dr. Robert w. buxton Surgery 

dr. john m. dennis Radiology 

dr. frank h. j. figge Anatomy 

dr. eugene b. brody Psychiatry 

DR. HARLAN I. FIRMINGER Pathology 

dr. Arthur l. haskins Obstetrics-Gynecology 

dr. martin helrich Anesthesiology 

vacant Pharmacology 

dr. fred r. mc crumb, jr International Medicine 

dr. lorin j. mullins Biophysics 

DR. ERLAND NELSON Neurology 

dr. richard d. richards Ophthalmology 

dr. george entwisle Preventive Medicine 

dr. charles l. wisseman Microbiology 

dr. theodore e. woodward Medicine 



DIVISIONAL HEADS 



Medicine 



vacant Clinical Pathology 

dr. Leonard m. scherlis . . Cardiology 



Radiology 



dr. john M. dennis Diagnosis 

dr. Fernando bloedorn . . Therapy 

Surgery 

dr. james G. Arnold, jr. Neurological Surgery 
dr. r. adams cowley Thoracic Surgery 

Preventive Medicine 

dr. paul f. richardson . . Physical Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 



Executive Committee of Faculty z|,Q 



MEDICAL SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVES TO 
THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

DR. EUGENE B. BRODY 1965 

DR. HARLAN I. FIRMINGER 1965 

DR. RAY HEPNER 1965 

DR. ADALBERT F. SCHUBART 1965 

DR. JEROME K. MERLIS 1965 

DR. EVERARD F. COX 1966 

DR. EUGENE J. LINBERG 1966 

DR. JOHN O'NEILL 1966 

DR. JOHN D. YOUNG 1966 

DR. ELIJAH ADAMS 1967 

DR. SAMUEL P. BESSMAN 1967 

DR. FRACIS J. BORGES 1967 

DR. LEONARD SCHERLIS 1967 

DR. MERRILL J. SNYDER 1967 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FACULTY 

dr. william s. stone Dean — Chairman 

DR. ELIJAH ADAMS 

DR. WILLIAM D. BLAKE 

DR. EUGENE B. BRODY 

DR. ROBERT W. BUXTON 

DR. JOHN M. DENNIS 

DR. GEORGE ENTWISLE 

DR. FRANK H. J. FIGGE 

DR. HARLAN I. FIRMINGER 

DR. ARTHUR L. HASKINS 

DR. MARTIN HELRICH 

DR. EPHRAIM LISANSKY 

DR. FRED R. MC CRUMB 

DR. LORIN J. MULLINS 

DR. ERLAND NELSON 

DR. RICHARD D. RICHARDS 

DR. CHARLES L. WISSEMAN, JR. 

DR. THEODORE E. WOODWARD 

DR. GEORGE H. YEAGER 

Elected Members 

DR. RAYMOND M. BURGISON 1966 

DR. OLLIE R. EYLAR 1966 

DR. JOHN G. WISWELL 1966 

DR. FRANK KALTREIDER 1966 



Faculty 1965-1966-1967 



Emeriti 



thomas R. chambers, a.b., m.d., Associate Professor of Surgery, Emeritus 

edgar b. friedenwald, m.d., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Emeritus 

frank w. hachtel, m.d., Professor of Bacteriology, Emeritus 

J. mason hundley, jr., m.d., Professor of Gynecology, Emeritus 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus 

William s. love, m.d., Professor of Clinical Medicine, Emeritus 

Dietrich c. smith, PH.D., Professor of Physiology, Emeritus 

hugh R. spencer, m.d., Professor of Pathology, Emeritus 

w. Houston toulson, m.d., Professor of Urology, Emeritus 

allen fiske voshell, m.d., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus 

Walter D. wise, m.d., Professor of Surgery, Emeritus 

waitman F. zinn, m.d., Professor of Otolaryngology, Emeritus 



Active 



Anatomy 

Frank H. J. Figge, Professor of Ana- 
tomy and Head of the Department; 
B. A., Colorado College, 1927; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1934. 

Juhan Anilane, Instructor; B.S., West- 
ern Michigan University, 1956; M.S., 
Rutgers University, 1962. 

Raymond Melvin Atkins, Instructor in 
Clinical Anatomy; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1952. 

Harry C. Bowie, Associate in Clinical 
Anatomy; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1933; M.D., 1936. 

Otto C. Brantigan, Professor of Clinical 
Anatomy; B.S., Northwestern Univer- 
sity, 1931; M.D., 1934. 



Michele T. Cerino, Instructor; M.D., 
University of Pisa, 1955; M.Sc, Mc- 
Gill University, 1963. 

Charles G. Crispens, Jr., Assistant Pro- 
fessor; B.S., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1953; M.S., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1955; Ph.D., Washington State 
University, 1959. 

Edward J. Donati, Instructor; B.A., 
King's College, 1951; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1964. 

Sven O. E. Ebbesson, Instructor; B.A., 
Southwestern College, 1957; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1964. 

Vernon E. Krahl, Professor of Anat- 
omy; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1939; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1946. 



50 



Faculty CJ1 



Theodore F. Leveque, Professor; B.A., 
University of Denver, 1949; M.S., 
1950; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1954. 

E. G. Linhardt, Instructor; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine, 1937. 

Robert B. McFadden, Instructor; B.S., 
Loyola College, Baltimore, 1940; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Karl Frederick Mech, Associate Pro- 
fessor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; M.D., 1935. 

Neil Novin, Instructor; B.A., New York 
University, Washington Square Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, 1951; M.D., 
State University of New York, Down- 
state Medical Center, College of Medi- 
cine, 1955. 

Ross Z. Pierpont, Associate in Clinical 
Anatomy; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1939; M.D., 1940. 

Edward H. Polley, Assistant Professor 
of Anatomy; A.B., DePauw Univer- 
sity, 1947; M.S., St. Louis University, 
1949; Ph.D., St. Louis University, 
1951. 

Frederick J. Ramsay, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Anatomy; B.S., Washington and 
Lee University, 1958; M.S., University 
of Illinois, Chicago Professional Col- 
leges, 1960; Ph.D., University of Illi- 
nois, Chicago Professional Colleges, 
1962. 

Herbert E. Reifschneider, Associate in 
Clinical Anatomy; B.A., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1922; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Marlyland, 1927. 

William Booth Settle, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Anatomy; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1930; M.D., 
1933. 

Gladys E. Wadsworth, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; B.S., State Teachers College, 
1936; M.A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, 1942; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Medicine, 
1955. 
William Wallace Walker, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Anatomy; B.S., 
West Virginia University, 1921; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1923. 
Jobeph Wells, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Rhode Island, 1956; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1959. 



Research Assistant 
Thomas A. Burns 

Graduate Student Assistants 

Ford F. Ebner 
C. Boyd Pfeiffer 
Robert L. Strautz 
Carl K. Uyeda 

Graduate Students Majoring in 
Anatomy 

G. Kenneth Adams 
Charles P. Barrett 
Ford F. Ebner 
John L. Echternach 
Jason M. Masters 
Margaret L. Olivier 
John P. Petrali 
C. Boyd Pfeiffer 
Joel Myron Snyder 
Robert L. Strautz 
Carl K. Uyeda 

Fellows 
Ford F. Ebner 

Anesthesiology 

Martin Helrich, Professor and Head of 
the Department of Anesthesiology; 
B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

John M. Atwood, Assistant Professor; 
A.B., Washington and Lee, 1942; 
M.D., Washington University, 1945. 

Louis R. Baker, Assistant Professor; 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 
1953; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 
1957. 

Gina Glick, Instructor; M.D., Loyola 
University, Stritch School of Medi- 
cine, 1956. 

Martin I. Gold, Associate Professor; 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1950; M.D., State University of New 
York, College of Medicine, Brooklyn, 
1954. 

Yong H. Han, Assistant Research Pro- 
fessor; B.S., Seoul National University, 
1944; M.D., Seoul National University 
School of Medicine, 1948. 



52 Faculty 



Norman B. Hollingsworth, Associate 
Professor; B.S., New York University, 
1948; M.D., New York Medical Col- 
lege, 1952. 

Y. Victor Kent, Instructor; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Istanbul, 1951. 

Walter Levy, Assistant Professor; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1929. 

T. Crawford McAslan, Instructor; M.B., 
Ch.B., University of Glasgow, 1945; 
D.A., Royal College of Physicians of 
London and the Royal College of Sur- 
geons of England, 1961. 

Alfred T. Nelson, Clinical Professor; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Joseph Patterson, Instructor; M.D., 
Harvard University School of Medi- 
cine, 1942. 

John W. Pearson, Instructor; M.D., Ox- 
ford University School of Medicine, 
1953. 

Joseph S. Redding, Associate Professor; 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 
1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1948. 

Calbert T. Seebert, Assistant Profes- 
sor, M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 
1951. 

Beatrice L. Selvin, Assistant Profes- 
sor; B.A., University of Michigan, 
1942; M.D., New York Medical Col- 
lege, 1945. 



Biological Chemistry 

Elijah Adams, Professor and Head of 
the Department; B.A., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1938; M.D., University of 
Rochester, 1942. 

Samuel P. Bessman, Professor (part 
time); M.D., Washington University, 
1944. 

Vernon C. Bode, Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of Missouri, 1955; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois (Urbana), 
1961. 

Ann Virginia Brown, Instructor; A.B., 
Goucher College, 1940. 

Arthur J. Emery, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor; B.S., Bucknell University, 1946; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1954. 



Frank M. Ganis, Assistant Professor 
(part time); A.B., University of Roch- 
ester, 1949; Ph.D., 1956. 

Rosa M. Gryder, Instructor; B.S., Buck- 
nell University, 1947; M.S., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1949; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1955. 

Ennis C. Layne, Assistant Professor 
(part time); B.S., George Washington 
University, 1950; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 
1955. 

Seymour Pomerantz, Associate Profes- 
sor; B.A., Rice Institute, 1948; Ph.D., 
University of Texas, 1952. 

Ronal G. Rosso, Instructor; M.D., St. 
Louis University, 1962. 

Audrey L. Stevens, Associate Profes- 
sor; B.S., Iowa State College, 1953; 
Ph.D., Western Reserve University, 
1958. 



Biophysics 

Lorin J. Mullins, Professor of Bio- 
physics and Chairman of Department; 
B.S., University of California, 1937; 
Ph.D., 1940. 

Raymond A. Sjodin, Associate Professor 
of Biophysics; B.S., California Insti- 
tute of Technology, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of California, 1955. 

Malvin D. Stern, Associate Professor 
of Biophysics; B.S., College of the 
City of New York, 1943; M.A., Prince- 
ton University, 1948; Ph.D., 1949. 

Albert Hybl, Assistant Professor of 
Biophysics; B.A., Coe College, 1954; 
Ph.D., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1961. 



Research Assistants and Fellows 

Marshall G. Doane, Fellow 
Thomas H. Finlay, Fellow 
Edward G. Henderson, Fellow 
Samuel D. Kaplan, Fellow 
Alexander E. Karu, Research Assistant 
Sister Mary Blanche, Fellow 
Anne M. Murphy, Research Assistant 
Lawrence S. Rosen, Fellow 
Kadhim N. Salman, Postdoctoral Fellow 



Faculty 53 



International Medicine 



Fred R. McCrumb, Jr., Professor of 
International Medicine and Head of 
the Department; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 

Mohammed A. Aziz, Research Associ- 
ate in International Medicine; M.B.- 
B.S., Dacca University, 1954; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1963. 

Herbert C. Barnett, Associate Pro- 
fessor of International Medicine; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1939; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1946; M.P.H., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1953; Ph.D., 
1954. 

Michael P. Friedman, Research Associ- 
ate in International Medicine; A.B., 
Western Maryland College, 1958; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

Laurence R. Gallager, Research Asso- 
ciate in International Medicine; A.B., 
Haverford College, 1958; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1962. 

John E. George, Research Associate 
in International Medicine; B.S., West 
Texas State University, 1957; M.S., 
Texas Technological College, 1960; 
Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1964. 

John R. Gorham, Research Associate in 
International Medicine; A.B., Miami 
University, 1953; M.S., Miami Uni- 
versity, 1956; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

Michael B. Gregg, Assistant Professor 
of International Medicine; A.B., Stan- 
ford University, 1952; M.D., Western 
Reserve University, 1956. 

Elizabeth Catherine Heinz, Instructor 
in International Medicine; B.A., 
Goucher College, 1951. 

Irwin I-Po Ho, Research Associate in 
International Medicine; B.A., National 
Taiwan University, 1953; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1962. 



Christian R. Klimt, Associate Profes- 
sor of International Medicine; M.D., 
University of Vienna, 1944; M.P.H., 
Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene 
and Public Health, 1952; Dr. P.H., 
1959. 

Alfred Kogon, Assistant Professor of 
International Medicine; B.A., Cornell 
University, 1952; M.D., New York 
University, 1956; M.P.H., Harvard 
University, 1961; Dr. P.H. Columbia 
University, 1964. 

Kenneth W. Ludlam, Research Associ- 
ate in International Medicine; B.S., 
University of Massachusetts, 1962; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

Vincent C. McCarthy, Research Asso- 
ciate in International Medicine; B.A., 
University of Toronto, 1953; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1961. 

William Arthur McDonald, Research 
Associate in International Medicine; 
B.S., University of California, 1951; 
M.A., 1954. 

Curtis L. Meinert, Research Associ- 
ate in International Medicine; B.A., 
University of Minnesota, 1956; M.S., 
1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

James William Messer, Research Asso- 
ciate in International Medicine; B.S., 
St. Josephs College, 1955; M.S., Loy- 
ola University, 1958; Ph.D., Jefferson 

Medical College, 1962. 
Gardner Middlebrook, Professor of 
International Medicine; A.B., Harvard 
University, 1938; M.D., Harvard Med- 
ical School, 1944. 

Mohamed Mujeeb, Research Associate 
in International Medicine; B.S., 
Osmania University, 1954; M.B.B.S., 
Osmania Medical College, 1960. 

Lt. Col. Nur Ahmad, A.M.C., Professor 
of International Medicine; M.B.B.S., 
Punjab University, 1953; M.C., Path. 
(London), 1964. 

Arthur C. Risser, Jr., Research Asso- 
ciate in International Medicine; B.S., 
Grinnell College, 1960; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Arizona, 1963. 



54 Faculty 



Richard Grant Robertson, Research 
Associate in International Medicine; 
B.S., Brigham Young University, 1959; 
M.S., 1962. 

Col. Ross F. Swall, Research Asso- 
ciate in International Medicine; B.S., 
Oregon State College, 1945; M.A., 
Baylor University, 1958 

Oscar Charles Tack, Jr., Research Pro- 
grammer in International Medicine; 
B.S., United States Naval Academy, 
1957. 

David Bartlett Thomas, Research As- 
sociate in International Medicine; B.S., 
University of Washington, 1959; 
M.D., 1963. 

Barbara A. Underwood, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of International Medicine; B.A., 
University of California, 1956; M.S., 
Cornell University, 1958; Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia University, 1962. 

Phillip David Wilson, Research Asso- 
ciate in International Medicine; B.S., 
University of Colorado, 1956; M.S., 
University of Minnesota, 1963. 



Medicine 

Theodore E. Woodward, Professor of 
Medicine and Head of the Department; 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 
1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1938; D.Sc., (Hon.), Western Mary- 
land College, 1950; D.Sc, (Hon.), 
Franklin and Marshall College, 1954. 

Conrad B. Acton, Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.S., Haverford College, 1925; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1929. 

George N. Agapitos, Associate in Med- 
icine; M.D., University of Athens 
(Greece), 1948. 

Marie Amelia Andersch, Associate 
Professor of Medicine in Biochemistry; 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1926; M.S., 
State University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1934. 

Andres W. Anderson, Assistant in Med- 
icine, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1921; M.D., 1929. 



Reubin Andres, Associate Professor of 
Medicine; M.D., Southwestern Medi- 
cal College, 1944. 

Albert M. Antlitz, Instructor in Med- 
icine; B.S., Georgetown University, 
1951; M.D., 1955. 

Leon Ashman, Associate in Medicine; 
B.S., College of the City of New York, 
1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1932. 

David Bacharach, Instructor in Derma- 
tology and Sy philology; B.A., St. 
John's College, 1938; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1942. 

Herbert C. Barnett, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine; B.S., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1939; M.S., University of Minne- 
sota, 1946; M.P.H., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1953; Ph.D., 1954. 

Edmund George Beacham, Assistant 
Professor of Medicine; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1940. 

Eugene Sydney Bereston, Associate 
Professor of Dermatology; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1945; D.Sc, 
1955. 

Emidio A. Bianco, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; B.S., Loyola College, 1950; 
M.D., Georgetown University, 1954. 

Charles J. Blazek, Associate in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Columbia University, 1942; 
M.D., 1945. 

Richard M. Blide, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; A.B., University of Roch- 
ester, 1951; M.D., Albany Medical 
College, 1955. 

Louis Vardee Blum, Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.A., University of Delaware, 
1930; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

Francis Joseph Borges, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Assistant Head 
of Hypertensive Clinic; B.S., Loyola 
College, 1946; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1950. 

Stuart H. Brager, Assistant in Medi- 
cine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1954; M.D., 1958. 



Faculty 55 



Joseph B. Bronushas, Assistant in Med- 
icine; B.S., Loyola College, 1946; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

William Ross Bundick, Associate in 
Dermatology; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1941. 

Bernard Burgin, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1936; 
M.D., 1939. 

Joseph W. Burnett, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; A.B., Yale University, 
1954; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 
1958. 

Marshall Paul Byerly, Associate in 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1925. 

Gordon Cader, Instructor in Medicine; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1948. 

T. Nelson Carey, Professor of Clinical 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1927. 

Douglass G. Carrol, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine; A.B., Yale Univer- 
sity, 1937; M.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1942. 

Gerard Church, Instructor in Medicine; 
M.B., Ch.B., University of Glasgow, 
1951; F.R.F.P.S. (G), 1956. 

B. Stanley Cohen, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

Jonas H. Cohen, Associate in Medicine; 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; 
M.D., 1940. 

Thomas B. Connor, Associate Professor 
of Medicine and Head, Division of 
Endocrinology and Metabolism; A.B., 
Loyola College, 1943; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1946. 

Elmer Ellsworth Cook, Jr., Assistant 
in Medicine; B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D.,1943. 

Edward F. Cotter, Associate Professor 
of Medicine; Associate in Neurology; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

William F. Cox, III, Associate in Med- 
icine; A.B., Amherst College, 1946; 
M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1947. 

Ernest Cross, Jr., Instructor in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1937; M.D., 1941. 



John R. Davis, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.A., West Virginia University, 1938; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 

Marvin H. Davis, Assistant in Medicine; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1940; 
M.D., 1943. 

Donald H. Dembo, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1951; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

Winston C. Dudley, Instructor in Med- 
icine; B.A., Oberlin College, 1943; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Robert G. Duvall, Jr., Instructor in 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1947. 

John Sheldon Eastland, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1921; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1925. 

William Carl Ebeling, III, Assistant 
Professor of Medicine and Head, Di- 
vision of Gastroenterology; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1944. 

George F. Ellinger, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine; B.A., University of 
Minnesota, 1931; M.D., 1935 

Frances A. Ellis, Professor of Clinical 
Dermatology; B.A., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1921; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1925. 

George Entwisle, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; B.S., University of Mas- 
sachusetts, 1944; M.D., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1948. 

William C. Esmond, Associate in Med- 
icine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1940; M.D., 1951. 

William L. Fearing, Associate in Neu- 
rology; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

Maurice Feldman, Jr., Instructor in 
Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1941; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1944. 

Lorraine G. Fiset, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1948; 
Ph.D., University of Cambridge (Eng- 
land), 1956. 

Philip D. Flynn, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.S., Georgetown University, 1929; 
M.D., 1933. 

Wetherbee Fort, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1919. 



er/^ Faculty 



Irving Freeman, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1932; M.D., 1935. 

Marion Friedman, Assistant in Med- 
icine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1938; M.D., 1942. 

Audrey Funk, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.A., Goucher College, 1940. 

Joseph C. Furnari, Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1942. 

William A. Gakenheimer, Instructor in 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1947. 

Frank M. Ganis, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; A.B., University of Roches- 
ter, 1949; Ph.D., 1956. 

Joseph R. Gladue, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; M.D., University of Rochester, 
1948. 

Marvin Goldstein, Associate in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1944. 

Luis Felipe Gonzalez, Instructor in 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1952. 

Sheldon Edward Greisman, Associate 
Professor of Medicine; M.D., New 
York University, 1949. 

William Howard Grenzer, Assistant in 
Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1931; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1935. 

Lewis Perkins Gundry, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine; B.A., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1924; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1928. 

Samuel Jay Hankin, Instructor in Med- 
icine; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1928. 

Ernest G. Hanowell, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine; A.B., George Wash- 
ington University, 1946; M.D., 1948. 

Louis Harmon, Instructor in Medicine; 
A.B., Lincoln University, 1928; M.D., 
Howard University, 1934. 

Jean E. Hawkins, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; A.B., Georgia State College 
for Women, 1951; M.A., Duke Univer- 
sity, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

Elizabeth C. Heinz, Instructor in Med- 
icine; B.A., Goucher College, 1951. 



William G. Helfrich, Associate in 
Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1931; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

W. Grafton Hersperger, Associate in 
Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1929; M.D., 1933. 

Leon H. Hetherington, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine; B.S., Washington 
and Jefferson College, 1923; M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1930. 

Mark B. Hollander, Assistant Professor 
of Dermatology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1927; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1931. 

Henry W. J. Holljes, Associate in 
Medicine; A.B., Western Maryland 
College, 1941; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1944. 

Z. Vance Hooper, Associate in Gastro- 
enterology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1920. 

Richard B. Hornick, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine and Head, Division of 
Infectious Diseases; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1951; M.D., 1955. 

Elizabeth B. Jackson, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine; A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1933. 

Meyer William Jacobson, Assistant 
Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1928; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1932. 

Rouben Jul, Assistant Professor in Med- 
cine; M.D., Royal College of Medi- 
cine, Baghdad, Iraq, 1950. 

Edward S. Kallins, Instructor in Med- 
icine; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 
1930; B.S., 1932; M.D., 1934. 

William Henry Kammer, Jr., Instruc- 
tor in Medicine; B.A., Loyola College, 
1935; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1939. 

Arthur Karfgin, Associate in Medicine; 
B.S., Washington College, 1929; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1932. 

Walter E. Karfgin, Associate in Med- 
icine; B.S., Washington College, 1932; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 

James R. Karns, Associate Professor of 
Medicine and Head, Student Health 
Service; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1939; M.D., 1940. 



Faculty CJJ 



Frank Thomas Kasik, Jr., Assistant in 
Medicine; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D., 1950. 

Leon E. Kassel, Assistant in Medicine; 
M.D., University of Virginia, 1949. 

Irvin B. Kemick, Instructor in Med- 
icine; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 
1933; B.S., 1935; M.D., 1937. 

Lauriston Livingston Keown, Instruc- 
tor in Medicine; B.A., St. John's Col- 
lege, 1929; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1933. 

Harry David Kerr, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; B.A., Maryville College, 
1951; M.D., Temple University, 1956. 

Joseph D. B. King, Instructor in Med- 
icine; A.B., Princeton University, 1941; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1944. 

Crawford N. Kirkpatrick, Jr., Instruc- 
tor in Pediatrics; A.B., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1940; M.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1943. 

Christian R. Klimt, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine; M.D., University of 
Vienna, 1944. 

Leon A. Kochman, Associate in Medi- 
cine; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1933. 

Theodere A. Kowitz, Instructor in Med- 
icine; A.B., New York University, 
1954; M.D., University of Pennsylva- 
nia, 1958. 

Louis A. M. Krause, Professor of Clin- 
ical Medicine; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1917. 

Julius R. Krevans, Associate Professor 
of Medicine; B.S., New York Univer- 
sity, 1944; M.D., 1946. 

Frank G. Kuehn, Associate in Medicine; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

Robert G. Lancaster, Instructor in 
Medicine; B.S., Gonzaga University, 
1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

Charles Edward Leach, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Medicine; M.D., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1935. 

Yu-Chen Lee, Assistant Professor in 
Medicine; B.S., Taikoku Imperial Uni- 
versity, 1945; M.D., National Taiwan 
University, Formosa, 1949. 

Samuel Legum, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1928; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1932. 



Lee R. Lerman, Assistant in Dermatol- 
ogy; B.S., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1930; M.D., Hahnemann Medi- 
cal College, 1935. 

Philip Franklin Lerner, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Neurology; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1927; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1931. 

Franklin Earl Leslie, Instructor in 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1941. 

Manuel Levin, Instructor in Medicine; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1930; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

David A. Levy, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1952; M.D., 1954. 

Kurt Levy, Assistant Professor of Med- 
icine; M.D., University of Cologne, 
1923. 

Anthony A. Lewandowski, Instructor 
in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 
1951; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

Ephraim Theodore Lisansky, Associate 
Professor of Medicine; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1937. 

Leonard Lister, Instructor in Medicine; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Sze-Jui Liu, Associate in Medicine; 
M.D., National Central University 
Medical College, China, 1947. 

William Samuel Love, Professor of 
Clinical Medicine, Emeritus. 

Harris Lovice, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.S., Heidelberg College (Ohio), 1951; 
M.D., Upstate Medical Center, New 
York, 1955. 

Robert J. Lyden, Assistant in Medicine; 
M.D., St. Louis University, 1952. 

David N. Marine, Assistant Professor in 
Medicine; M.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1947. 

Jason M. Masters, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; B.A., High Point College, 1951; 
M.A., Sul Ross State College, 1956. 

Joseph Charles Matchar, Instructor in 
Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1939; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1943. 

Fred R. McCrumb, Jr., Professor of 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1948. 



58 Faculty 



George McLean, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1916. 
Jerome K. Merlis, Professor of Neurol- 
ogy and Professor of Clinical Neuro- 
physiology; B.S., University of Louis- 
ville, 1933; M.D., 1977; M.S., 1938. 
George G. Merrill, Assistant Professor 
of Neurology; A.B., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1932; M.D., Harvard University, 
1937. 
Stanley Miller, Associate in Medicine; 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1939; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 
1943. 
Donald W. Mintzer, Assistantin Medi- 
cine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1943; M.D., 1944. 
W. Keith C. Morgan, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine; M.B., Ch.B., Univer- 
sity of Sheffield, England, 1953. 
Zachariah R. Morgan, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Gastroenterology; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1918. 
Samuel Morrison, Associate Professor 
of Medicine; Associate Professor of 
Gastroenterology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1925; M.D., 1929. 
Theodore H. Morrison, Clinical Profes- 
sor of Gastroenterology; M.D., College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, 1915. 
S. Edwin Muller, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1937. 
Joseph E. Muse, Jr., Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 
1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1937. 
John Alfred Myers, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 
1927; M.E.E., 1933; M.D., 1938. 
Joseph Carl Myers, Assistant in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Western Maryland College, 
1939; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1943. 
James J. Nolan, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.S., Loyola College, 1937; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1941. 
Samuel I. O'Mansky, Assistant in Med- 
icine; B.A., Duke University, 1952; 
M.D., 1957. 
David A. Oursler, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 



Chris Papadopoulos, Instructor in Med- 
icine; M.B.B.Ch., University of Alex- 
andria (Egypt), 1956. 
Robert T. Parker, Associate Professor 
of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1941; M.D., 1944. 
Walter J. Pijanowski, Instructor in 
Medicine; B.S., University of North 
Carolina, 1937; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1939. 
Abraham A. Polachek, Associate in 
Medicine; B.S., City College of New 
York, 1935; M.D., University of 
Texas, 1942. 
J. Emmett Queen, Associate in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Loyola College, 1939; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 
M. Kevtn Quinn, Assistant in Medicine; 
M.B., University College, Dublin, Ire- 
land, 1945. 
Abdul N. Rahman, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity 1952; M.D., 1956. 
George M. Ramapuram, Instructor in 
Medicine; M.B., B.S., University of 
Madras, 1950. 
Jose Ramirez-Rivera, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1949; M.D., Yale Univer- 
sity, 1953. 
Raymond Randall, Associate Professor 
of Clinical Investigation in Medicine; 
D.V.M., U. S. College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, 1917. 
Howard F. Raskin, Associate Professor 
of Medicine and Head, Division of 
Gastroenterology; B.A., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1945; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1949. 
Joan Raskin, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine in Dermatology; B.A., Gou- 
cher College, 1951; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1955. 
Julian Reed, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.S., University of Maryland; M.D., 
1952. 
Robert Andrew Reiter, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1928; M.D., 1932. 
Samuel T. R. Revell, Jr., Professor of 
Medicine; B.S., University of Georgia, 
1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1937. 



Faculty gQ 



Harry M. Robinson, Jr., Professor of 
Dermatology and Head, Division of 
Dermatology; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1935. 

Raymond C. Vail Robinson, Associate 
Professor of Dermatology and Assist- 
ant Chief of Dermatology Clinic; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 
1940; M.S., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1950. 

Donald James Roop, Assistant in Medi- 
cine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1940; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1950. 

Benjamin Rothfeld, Assistant in Medi- 
cine; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1941; M.S., 1942; M.D., Bowman- 
Gray School of Medicine, 1945. 

Seymour Rubin, Assistant in Medicine; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1946; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

Edward Rusche, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; M.D., University of Leyden (The 
Netherlands), 1954. 

Leo Schamroth, Associate in Medicine; 
M.B., B.Ch., University of Witwaters- 
rand, Johannesburg, 1948. 

Leonard Scherlis, Associate Professor 
of Medicine and Head, Division of 
Cardiology; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1942; M.D., 1945. 

Sidney Scherlis, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1934; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1938. 

Adalbert F. Schubart, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Head, Divi- 
sion of Arthritis; M.D., University of 
Heidelberg, 1947. 

Marvin M. Schuster, Instructor in Med- 
icine; B.A., University of Chicago, 
1950; B.S., 1951; M.D., 1955. 

Harry B. Scott, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.A., University of Virginia, 1943; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Samuel Segall, Assistant in Medicine; 
M.D., University of Jena, Germany, 
1929. 

Lawrence M. Serra, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine; Ph.G., University of 
Maryland, 1925; M.D., 1929. 

Albert Shapiro, Assistant Professor of 
Dermatology; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1937. 



Charles E. Shaw, Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1942; M.D., 1944. 

William H. Shea, Assistant in Derma- 
tology; B.S., Loyola College, 1947; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Joseph Shear, Assistant in Medicine; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
M.D., 1947. 

Jerome Sherman, Associate in Medi- 
cine; M.D., University of Western On- 
tario, 1941. 

Margaret L. Sherrard, Assistant in 
Medicine; B.A., Seton Hill College, 
1945; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1949. 

Elizabeth Brown Sherrill, Instructor 
in Medicine; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1938; M.D., 1941. 

Bernard R. Shochet, Instructor in Med- 
icine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1952; M.D. 1954. 

Abraham A. Silver, Assistant in Medi- 
cine; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1928. 

David G. Simpson, Associate Professor 
of Medicine; M.B., B.Ch., Queen's 
University (Belfast); M.D., 1950. 

Bahram Sina, Instructor in Medicine; 
University of Tehran, 1948; Univer- 
sity of Paris (France), 1952. 

Nicholas P. Sinaly, Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.S., Fordham University, 1948; 
M.D., New York University, 1952. 

Robert T. Singleton, Assistant Profes- 
sor in Medicine; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1951; M.D., 1953. 

Solomon Smith, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1927; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1931. 

Vernon Smith, Professor of Clinical 
Medicine; M.D., Temple University, 
1949. 

John N. Snyder, Associate in Medicine; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Merrill J. Snyder, Associate Professor 
of Medicine in Clinical Microbiology; 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

William C. Speed, III, Instructor in 
Medicine; B.S., Trinity College, 1940; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 



60 Faculty 



William S. Spicer, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Head, Division 
of Pulmonary Diseases; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Kansas 1949. 
Carroll L. Spurling, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine; M.D., Bowman-Gray 
School of Medicine, 1947. 
John C. Stauffer, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Princeton University, 1949; 
M.D., Harvard University, 1953. 
Stanley Roy Steinbach, Associate in 
Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1942; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1945. 
John E. Strahan, Associate in Derma- 
tology; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1949. 
Stuart D. Sunday, Instructor in Medi- 
cine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1936. 
Kyle Y. Swisher, Jr., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 
Harry Allen Teitelbaum, Assistant 
Professor of Neurology; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1929; M.D., 1935; 
Ph.D., 1936. 
William D. Tigertt, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine; M.D., Baylor Uni- 
versity, 1937; A.B., 1938. 
Yasushi Togo, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; B.S., Tokyo Kotogakke 
(Japan), 1941; M.D., University of 
Tokyo, 1945. 
Wilfred Henry Townshend, Associate 
in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1936; M.D. University of 
Maryland, 1940. 
Stephen J. Van Lill, III, Associate in 
Medicine; B.A., Duke University, 
1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1943. 
Frederick J. Vollmer, Instructor in 
Medicine; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 
1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1938. 
Julius Waghelstein, Instructor in Med- 
icine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
M.D., 1935. 
Lester A. Wall, Jr., Associate in Med- 
icine; B.A., St. John's College, 1937; 
University of Maryland, 1941. 



Ralph Weber, Instructor in Medicine; 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 
1949; M.D., Temple University, 1954. 
Daniel Wilfson, Jr., Associate in Medi- 
cine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1936. 

Charles Herman Williams, Associate 
in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1937; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1942. 

Charles L. Wisseman, Jr., Assistant 
Professor of Medicine; B.A., Southern 
Methodist University, 1941; M.S., 
Kansas State College, 1943; M.D., 
Southwestern Medical School, 1946. 

John G. Wiswell, Associate Professor 
of Medicine; B.A., Dalhousie Univer- 
sity, 1938; B.S., 1940; M.O.C.M., 1943. 

Celeste L. Woodward, Assistant in 
Medicine; B.A., University Aix-Mar- 
seilles (France), 1932; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1938. 

Joseph Berkley Workman, Associate 
Professor of Medicine; B.A., Western 
Maryland College, 1943; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1946. 

Thomas L. Worsley, Jr., Assistant in 
Medicine; B.S., University of North 
Carolina, 1937; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1939. 

Stanley N. Yaffe, Associate in Medi- 
cine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1941; M.D., 1944. 

Philip D. Zieve, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine; A.B., Franklin and Marshall 
College, 1954; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1958. 



Fellows 

James K. Aton, Fellow in Medicine in 

Dermatology. 
Eugenio Benitez, Fellow in Medicine in 

Cardiology. 
John T. Bulkeley, Fellow in Medicine 

in Infectious Diseases. 
N. David Charkes, Fellow in Medicine 

in Radio-Isotopes. 
Albert Ciambotti, Fellow in Medicine 

in Dermatology. 
Victor Coronho, Fellow in Medicine in 

Endocrinology. 



Faculty £± 1 



Lillian Darago, Fellow in Medicine. 
Rolf Ewald, Fellow in Medicine in 

Arthritis. 
Michael Madeloff, Fellow in Medicine 

in Hypertension. 
Elsa R. Merani, Fellow in Medicine in 

Hematology. 
Arthur L. Poffenbarger, Fellow in 

Medicine in Neurology. 
Daniel Roberts, Fellow in Medicine in 

Dermatology. 
W. C. Schroeder, Fellow in Medicine 

in Arthritis. 
Franklin D. Schwartz, Fellow in Medi- 
cine in Hypertension. 
William Stodghill, Fellow in Medicine 

in Endocrinology. 
Desmond Sweeney, Fellow in Medicine 

in Arthritis. 



Microbiology 



Charles Louis Wisseman, Jr., Professor 
of Microbiology and Head of the De- 
partment; B.A., Southern Methodist 
University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State 
College, 1943; M.D., Southwestern 
Medical School, 1946. 

Ollie Roddy Eylar, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor; B.A., University of Minnesota, 
1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

Paul Fiset, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Laval University, Quebec, Canada, 
1944; M.D., Laval University Medical 
School, 1949; Ph.D., University of 
Cambridge, England, 1956. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of 
Bacteriology, Emeritus. 

Hyman Edmund Levin, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1922; M.D., 1926. 

Tohko Yoda Kaufman, Research Asso- 
ciate Professor; B.A., Tsuda College, 
Tokyo, Japan, 1940; M.Sc, Hebrew 
University, Jerusalem, 1955; Ph.D., 
University of Munich, Germany, 1960. 

Fred R. McCrumb, Assistant Professor; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

William Frederic Myers, Assistant 
Professor; B.A., University of Kansas, 
1949; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1958. 

Edward Charles Rosenzweig, Assistant 
Professor; A.B., Centre College, 1951; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1959. 



Andrew George Smith, Associate Pro- 
fessor; B.S., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1940; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

Merrill J. Snyder, Associate Professor; 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

Robert Traub, Research Professor; B.S., 
College of the City of New York, 
1938; M.S., Cornell University, 1939; 
Ph.D., 1947. 

Ruth Graeser Wittler, Adjunct In- 
structor; M.S., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1944; Ph.D., Western Reserve 
University, 1947. 

Associate 

Antonio R. Noriega, M.D., Ph.D. 

Research Associates 
Robert L. Amoureux, M.S. 
John N. Hatgi, M.S. 
Jose V. Ordonez, M.D., M.P.H. 
Arthur C. Risser, Jr., B.A., M.S. 
Richard G. Robertson, M.S. 

Assistants 

Velma Bryan (PT), A.B. 

Roy Kronmeyer 

Ruth Perry (PT), A.B. 

Helle Starcke 

Ruth Wells 

Thomas Evans, B.A. 

Research Assistants 
John Engelman, M.Sc. 
Bertram Harrington, B.S. 

Fellows 
Robert W. Chandler, M.S. 
Gerald A. Cole, B.A. 
Donald W. Helbig, M.D. 
Joseph V. Osterman, B.A. 
Margaret R. Rorabaugh, B.A. 
Ronald Silberman, M.S. 

Summer Fellows 
Joel M. Cherry 
Robert R. Holthaus 
Stanley A. Kaplan 
Michael M. Lee 
Hannah R. Segal 
Franklin R. Stuart 



52 faculty 



Neurology 



Erland Nelson, Professor of Neurology 
and Head of the Department of Neu- 
rology; A.B., Carthage College, 1947; 
M.D., Columbia University College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1961. 

Jerome K. Merlis, Professor of Neu- 
rology and Professor of Clinical Neu- 
rophysiology; B.S., University of 
Louisville, 1933; M.D., 1937; M.S., 
1938. 

Andrew C. Gillis, M.A., M.D., D.Sc, 
LL.D., Professor of Neurology, Emer- 
itus. 

Albert F. Heck, Instructor in Neu- 
rology; A.B., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1954; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1958. 

Barbara Hulfish, Instructor in Neu- 
rology; A.B., American University, 
1944; M.D., University of Rochester, 
1952. 

Morton D. Kramer, Instructor in Neu- 
rology; A.B., University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1955. 

Robert S. Mosser, Assistant Professor 
in Pediatrics and Instructor in Neu- 
rology; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1949; M.D., 1951. 

Anatol H. Oleynick, Instructor in Neu- 
rology; A.B., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1952; M.D., University of 
Chicago School of Medicine, 1956. 

Harry Allen Teitelbaum, Associate 
Professor of Neurology; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1929; M.D., 1935; 
Ph.D.. 1936. 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Arthur L. Haskins, Professor of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology and Head of 
the Department; B.A., University of 
Rochester, 1938; M.D., 1943. 

Joseph S. Ardinger, Assistant; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1941; M.D., 
1944. 



J. Tyler Baker, Associate; B.S., Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, 1930; M.D., 
Temple University, 1936. 
Margaret B. Ballard, Associate; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1926. 
Robert M. Barnett, Assistant; B.S., 
College of Charleston, 1951; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1959. 
Harry McBrine Beck, Assistant; B.S., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1939. 
Joseph P. C. Boggio, Assistant; B.S., 
Loyola, 1943; M.D., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1955. 
Leo Brady, Assistant Clinical Professor; 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1913; 
M.D., 1917. 
Osborne D. Christensen, Associate; 
M.D., George Washington University, 
1935. 
Harry Cohen, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1939; M.D., 1943. 
Robert S. Coplan, Assistant; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1948; M.D., 
Harvard Medical School, 1953. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., Associate 
Clinical Professor; B.A., St. John's 
College, 1931; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1935. 
George Howey Davis, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; B.S., Washington College, 
1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1936. 
Ronald L. Diener, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956; M.D., 
1958. 
Everett S. Diggs, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1934; M.D., 1937. 
D. McClelland Dixon, Assistant Clini- 
cal Professor; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1932; M.D., 1936. 
William A. Dodd, Associate; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1934. 
Augustin Dordai, Assistant; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Lausanne, Switzerland, 
1955. 
John C. Dumler, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1928; M.D., 1932. 
James Paul Durkan, Instructor; A.B., 
Loyola College, 1955; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1959. 



Faculty 53 



Daniel Ehrlich, Associate; B.S., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1939; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1943. 

Marino R. Facelo, Assistant; M.D., 
Manila Central University, 1955. 

Vincent DePaul Fitzpatrick, Jr., As- 
sistant; B.A., Loyola College, 1942; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 

James Patrick Gallaher, Assistant; 
A.B., West Virginia University, 1947; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Rafael Garcia, Instructor; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Zaragoza, Spain, 1952. 

Louis C. Gareis, Associate; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 
1938. 

William D. Gentry, Jr., Assistant; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 

William Martin Hall, Assistant; A.B., 
Lincoln University; M.D., Meharry 
Medical College, 1953. 

Erwin Hecker, Assistant; B.S., Tulane 
University, 1944; M.D., 1947. 

Harold J. Hettleman, Assistant; B.S., 
Loyola College, 1953; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1957. 

Claude D. Hill, Assistant; B.S., Morgan 
State College, 1947; M.D., Meharry 
Medical College, 1952. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D., Profes- 
sor of Gynecology, Emeritus. 

Walter E. James, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1935; M.D., 
1955. 

D. Frank Kaltreider, Professor of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1937. 

Theodore Kardash, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1938; M.D., 1942. 

William Korman, Assistant; B.S., Mc- 
Gill University, 1942; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Toronto, 1953. 

Norman Levin, Associate; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1947. 

Charles B. Marek, Associate; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1931; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1946. 

Clarence W. Martin, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1940. 

George A. Maxwell, Associate; B.A., 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1942; 
M.D., 1944. 



Hugh B. McNally, Associate Clinical 
Professor; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1930; M.D., 1934. 

Edmund B. Middleton, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1949. 

George H. Miller, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1951; M.D., 1953. 

Harold R. Misenhimer, Instructor; 
M.D., George Washington University, 
1956. 

Frank K. Morris, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; B.A., Loyola College, 1923; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1927. 

John Huff Morrison, Assistant Clinical 
Professor; B.S., West Virginia Wes- 
leyan College, 1934; M.D., Jefferson 
Medical College, 1940. 

Erica F. Moszkowski, Assistant Profes- 
sor; B.S., Liceo Nacional De Senoritas 
N 1, 1946; M.D., University of Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, 1954. 

L. Louis Mould, Clinical Instructor, 
M.C., M.D., Queen's University, On- 
tario, 1952. 

Richard Savage Munford, Assistant 
Professor; B.A., University of Roches- 
ter, 1951; M.D., Yale University, 1951. 

Herbert H. Nasdor, Assistant; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1957. 

Artemis P. Panayis, Instructor; M.D., 
University of Athens, Greece, 1958. 

Louis Leroy Randall, Assistant; B.S., 
Morgan State College, 1953; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1957. 

John Morris Reese, Clinical Professor; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

Benson C. Schwartz, Associate; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1948. 

J. King B. E. Seegar, Jr., Assistant 
Clinical Professor; B.A., Columbia 
University, 1933; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1937. 

James H. Shell, Jr., Assistant; B.S., 
Furman University, 1942; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1945. 

Isadore A. Siegel, Clinical Professor; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1919; 
M.D., 1923. 

Stedman W. Smith, Associate; B.A., 
Brown University, 1936; M.D., Mc- 
Gill University, 1940. 

Hans D. Taubert, Instructor; M.D., 
Ludwigs-Maximilians Universitaet, Mu- 
nich. Germany, 1955. 



^4 Faculty 



F. X. Paul Tinker, Assistant; B.S., 
Loyola College, 1941; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 1944. 

James E. Toher, Associate; B.S., Pro- 
vidence College, 1930; M.D., George- 
town University, 1954. 

Cesar L. Tonder, Assistant; M.D., San 
Marcos University, 1957. 

ZsiGMUND J. Toth, Assistant; B.S., Lou- 
isiana State University. 1939; M.D., 
1943. 

Jose G. Valderas, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Puerto Rico, 1946; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1947. 

Umberto VillaSanta, Assistant Profes- 
sor; M.D., University of Padua, Italy, 
1950. 

Evans Voultepsis, Assistant; M.D., 
Athens University, 1953. 

George E. Wells, Jr., Assistant; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1947; M.D., 
1934. 

Earle M. Wilder, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1930; M.D., 1934. 

William S. Womack, Assistant; B.S., 
Lynchburg College, 1946; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1948. 

Annelies S. Zachary, Assistant; M.D., 
Ludkiss-Max University, Munich. 
1952. 

Frederick M. Zerzavy, Assistant; M.C., 
Masaryk University, Brno., 1939; 
M.D., University of Zagreb, Yugo- 
slavia, 1942. 



John J. Creamer, Instructor; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950; M.D., New 
York Medical College, 1960. 

Gilbert N. Feinberg, Instructor; 
Johns Hopkins University, 1955; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1959. 

Samuel L. Fox, Associate Professor; 
B.S.. University of Maryland, 1936; 
M.D., 1938. 

Julian R. Goldberg, Instructor; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., 
University of Maryland. 1955. 

William M. Hart, Clinical Professor; 
A.B.. Missouri State College, 1937; 
M.S.. State University of Iowa, 1939; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1941; 
M.D., Temple University, 1948. 

Alfred A. Meisels, Assistant Professor; 
M.D., University of Vienna, 1958. 

Robert H. Peckham, Research Profes- 
sor; B.A., University of Rochester, 
1930; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1933. 

Stanley S. Schocket, Assistant Profes- 
sor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1955; M.D., 1959. 

Judd R. Wilkins, Research Assistant 
Professor; B.S., University of Illinois, 
1946; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 



Pathology 



Ophthalmology 

Richard D. Richards, Professor and 
Head of the Department; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 1948; M.D., 1951; 
M.Sc, State University of Iowa, 1957. 

Howard N. Bernstein, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; B.A., Bucknell University, 
1953; M.D., State University of New 
York Downstate Medical Center, 1957. 

Thenton D. Boaz, Clinical Assistant 
Professor; M.D., George Washington 
University, 1929. 

Carl R. Cavontus, Research Assistant 
Professor; B.A., Wesleyan University, 
1953; M.S., Brown University, 1961; 
Ph.D., Brown University, 1962. 



Harlan I. Firminger, Professor of Pa- 
thology and Head of the Department; 
A.B... Washington University, 1939; 
M.D., 1943. 

John E. Adams, Assistant Professor of 
Forensic Pathology; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1954; M.D., 1956. 

Rudiger Breitenecker, Instructor in 
Forensic Pathology; M.D., University 
of Vienna. 1954. 

Thomas J. Burkart, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Pathology; B.S., Loyola College, 
1949; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1953. 

Russell S. Fisher, Professor of Forensic 
Pathology and Head, Division of Fo- 
rensic Pathology; B.S., Georgia School 
of Technology, 1937; M.D., Medical 
College of Virginia, 1942. 



Faculty 55 



Henry C. Freimuth, Associate Profes- 
sor of Forensic Pathology; B.S., Col- 
lege of the City of New York, 1932; 
M.S., New York University, 1933; 
Ph.D., 1938. 

Paul F. Guerin, Assistant Professor of 
Forensic Pathology; A.B., Wittenburg 
College, 1942; M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1945. 

Wilson A. Heefner, Instructor in Path- 
ology; Gettysburg College, 1956; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1960. 

William J. Hicken, Instructor in Pa- 
thology; B.A., Loyola College, 1954; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Howard C. Hopps, Professor of Path- 
ology; B.S., The University of Okla- 
homa, 1935; M.D., 1937. 

Robert Y. Katase, Assistant Professor 
of Pathology; B.S., Otterbein College, 
1946; M.D., Hahnemann Medical Col- 
lege, 1952. 

Gordon Kay, Instructor in Pathology; 
M.A., University of Oxford, 1953; 
M.B.Ch.B., University of Edinburg, 
1956. 

Lester Kiefer, Assistant Professor of 
Pathology; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1953. 

P. Watson Kime, Instructor in Pathol- 
ogy; B.Sc., University of Wales, 1950; 
M.B., BCH, Welsh National School of 
Medicine, 1953. 

Howard Levin, Assistant Professor of 
Pathology; A.B., Bowdoin College, 
1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1958. 

Richard Lindenberg, Associate Profes- 
sor of Forensic Pathology; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Berlin, 1944. 

Walter C. Merkel, Associate Professor 
of Pathology; A.B., Dickinson College, 
1922; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1926. 

Charles S. Petty, Associate Professor 
of Foreign Pathology; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1941; M.S., 1946; 
M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1950. 

Peter Rasmussen, Associate Professor 
of Pathology; M.D., Temple Univer- 
sity School of Medicine, 1952. 



Dexter L. Reimann, Associate Professor 
of Pathology; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1935; M.D., 1939. 

Mitchell Rosenholtz, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pathology; B.A., Harvard 
University, 1952; M.D., University of 
Minnesota Medical School, 1956. 

Robert B. Schultz, Associate Professor 
of Pathology; A.B., Whitman College, 
1946; M.A., Stanford University, 1948; 
M.D., Yale University, 1952. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of 
Pathology, Emeritus. 

Robert E. Stowell, Professor of Pa- 
thology; A.B., Stanford University, 
1936; M.D., Stanford University 
School of Medicine, 1941; Ph.D., 
Washington University School of Med- 
icine, 1944. 

M. Wilson Toll, Associate Professor of 
Pathology and Head, Division of Cy- 
topathology; M.Sc, McGill University, 
1935; M.D., 1940. 

John A. Wagner, Professor of Neuro- 
pathology and Head, Division of 
Neuropathology; B.S., Washington Col- 
lege, 1934; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1938. 

Tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor 
of Pathology; B.A., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1930; M.D., 1933. 

Colin Wood, Associate Professor of 
Pathology; M.B., Ch.B., Birmingham 
University, 1946; M.D., 1957. 

Robert B. Wright, Associate Professor 
of Pathology; B.S., Centre College, 
1920; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1924. 

Fellows and Research Assistants 
and Associates 

Hans Bergmann, Research Assistant in 
Pathology. 

Howard Wisotzkey, Fellow in Neuro- 
pathology. 

Pediatrics 

J. Edmund Bradley, Professor of Pedi- 
atrics and Head of the Department; 
B.S., Loyola College, 1928; M.D., 
Georgetown University, 1932. 



fifi Faculty 



Virginia Lee Ault, Instructor in Pedi- 
atrics; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1950; R.N., Union Memorial, 1945; 
M.D., University of Vermont, 1959. 
Ruth W. Baldwin, Associate Professor 
of Pediatrics and Director of the Pe- 
diatric Seizure Clinic; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1941; M.D., 1943. 
George M. Bauernschrub, Jr., Assist- 
ant; B.S., Loyola College, 1950; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 
Samuel P. Bessman, Research Professor 
of Pediatrics; M.D., Washington Uni- 
versity, 1944. 
Edwin H. Besson, Instructor; B.S., 
Washington College, 1950; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1954. 
Lester Harold Caplan, Instructor; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1940. 
John F. Carter, Assistant; B.S., State 
Teachers College, Frostburg, 1953; 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1958. 
Raymond L. Clemmens, Associate Pro- 
fessor and Director of the Central 
Evaluation Clinic; B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1947; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1951. 
Joseph M. Cordi, Instructor; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1931; M.S., 
1933; M.D., 1936. 
Robert M. N. Crosby, Instructor; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1943. 
Garrett E. Deane, Instructor; B.S., 
Westminster College, 1943; M.D., 
Washington University, 1946. 
Dora Z. Due, Instructor in Pediatrics; 
A.B., Incarnate Word College, 1953; 
M.D., University of Texas School of 
Medicine, 1957. 
Edward G. Field, Associate; B.S., Hamp- 
den-Sydney College, 1942; M.D., Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, 1945 
Jerome Fineman, Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1930; 
M.D., 1933. 
Abraham Harry Finkelstein, Professor 
of Clinical Pediatrics; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1927. 
Jacob Frankel, Instructor, Medical Psy- 
chology in Pediatrics; A.B., Boston 
University, 1954; M.A., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1959. 



Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Profes- 
sor of Clinical Pediatrics, Emeritus. 
Kurt Glaser, Associate Professor; M.D., 
University of Lausanne, 1939; M.Sc, 
University of Illinois, 1948. 
Samuel S. Glick, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1920; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
Thomas A. Good, Associate Professor; 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1948; 
M.D., 1952. 
Howard Goodman, Instructor; Ph.G., 
University of Maryland, 1930; B.S., 
1932; M.D., 1934. 
Martin K. Gorten, Associate Profes- 
sor; B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1949. 
Gary Goshorn, Instructor; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1955. 
Milton S. Grossman, Assistant Profes- 
sor in Pediatrics; A.B., Harvard, 1947; 
M.A., Boston University, 1948; Ph.D., 
New York University; M.D., Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, 1957, 
Clare L. Hammel, Assistant Professor 
of Pediatric Research; M.D., George 
Washington University, 1958; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1964. 
Mary L. Hayleck, Instructor, A.B., 
Goucher College, 1934; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1938. 
W. Alvin Hecker, Assistant; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1955. 
Frederick Joseph Heldrich, Jr., Assist- 
ant Professor; B.A., Gettysburg Col- 
lege, 1945; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1948. 
W. Ray Hepner, Professor of Pedia- 
trics; B.S., University of Chicago, 
1941; M.D., 1944. 
Clewell Howell, Associate; B.S., Da- 
vidson College, 1919; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1924. 
Robert C. Irwin, Instructor in Pedi- 
atrics; A.B., Georgetown University, 
1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1959. 
Eleanor M. Jantz, Assistant Professor 
of Medical Psychology; B.S., North- 
western, 1953; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 
1959. 



Faculty fJ7 



Philip J. Jensen, Associate Professor of 
Pediatrics, Assistant Director Pedia- 
tric O.P.D. Clinic; A.B., University of 
Virginia, 1947; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1952; M.S.C., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

Murray Kappelman, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Clinical Pediatrics; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1953; M.D., 1955. 

Thomas J. Kenny, Instructor in Pedia- 
trics; A.B., Washington and Lee, 
1954; M.A., Peabody College, 1959. 

Donald F. Klein, Assistant; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1949; M.D., Yale 
University, 1954. 

Shabse H. Kurland, Assistant; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1947; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1949; Ph.D., 
1952. 

Arnold F. Lavenstein, Instructor; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1939. 

Ennis C. Layne, Instructor; B.S., George 
Washington University, 1950; M.S.. 
1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

George A. Lentz, Jr., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pediatrics and Fellow, Phys- 
ical Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1953; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1957. 

Eli M. Lippman, Instructor in Pediatrics 
and Consultant to the Central Evalu- 
ation Clinic; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1936; M.D., Long Island Col- 
lege of Medicine, 1940. 

Richard L. London, Assistant Professor 
of Pediatrics; A.B., University of Cin- 
cinnati, 1945; M.D., University of Ten- 
nessee, 1949. 

James A. Lyon, Jr., Assistant Professor; 
A. A., Princeton University, 1944; 
M.D., Long Island College of Medi- 
cine, 1947. 

Edward E. Maher, Instructor in Pedi- 
atrics; B.S., University of Notre Dame, 
1954; M.D., Georgetown University, 
1958. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, Associate; B.S., 
Gettysburg College, 1925; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1930. 



Mary E. Matthews, Assistant; B.S., 
North Carolina State College, 1936; 
M.S., University of North Carolina, 
1945; M.D., 1949. 

Fred R. McCrumb, Associate; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1948. 

Norman L. Miller, Instructor in Pedi- 
atrics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1951; M.D., 1953. 

Robert S. Mosser, Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; 
M.D., 1951. 

Paul A. Mullan, Instructor; B.S., Seton 
Hall University, 1952; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1957. 

Prasanna Nair, Instructor in Pediatrics; 
M.B.B.S., University of Delhi, 1956. 

William A. Niermann, Assistant; M.D., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1948. 

Boris O'Mansky, Assistant in Pediatrics; 
M.D., Duke University, 1957. 

William S. Parker, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Chattanooga, 1947; M.D., 
University of Tennessee, 1951. 

Charles Lee Randol, Instructor; M.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

Inge Renner, Instructor, M.B.B.S., Uni- 
versity of Hong Kong, 1953. 

Antonio M. Rivera, Instructor in Pedi- 
atrics; B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 
1947; M.D., State University of New 
York, Upstate Medical Center, 1955. 

Hildegard Rothmund, Instructor; M.D., 
Heidelberg, 1945; Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1955. 

Oakley H. Saunders, Instructor in 
Pediatrics; M.D., Meharry Medical 
College, 1957; B.S., O.D., Northern 
Illinois. College of Optometry. 

Richard M. Sarles, Instructor in Pedi- 
atrics; B.S., Georgetown University, 
1957; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

Leonard Scherlis, Instructor; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1942; M.D., 
1945. 

Sidney Scherlis, Associate Professor; 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1938. 

William M. Seabold, Assistant Profes- 
sor, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1928; M.D., 1931. 



^Q Faculty 



Gilbert Shiffman, Assistant Professor 
of Pediatrics and Instructor in Physical 
Medicine; A.A., George Washington 
University. 1947; A.B., 1951; B.S., 
O.D., Northern Illinois College of Op- 
tometry, 1947-1949; Ed.M., Temple 
University, 1954-1959; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1963. 

Bernice Sigman, Instructor in Pediatrics; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

William A. Sinton, Jr., Instructor in 
Pediatrics; B.S., William & Mary, 
1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

Fred B. Smith, Associate Professor; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

Melchijah Spragins, Associate; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1941; M.D., 
1944. 

Alvin A. Stambler, Associate; B.S., 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Arnold Tramer, Instructor; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1949. 

Arnold Vance, Instructor; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1953. 

Stuart H. Walker, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Middlebury College, 1942; M.D., 
New York University, 1945. 

George H. Wall, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1954. 

Karl H. Weaver, Assistant Professor; 
A.B., West Virginia University, 1950; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 

William Earl Weeks, Assistant; B.S., 
Wake Forest College, 1937; M.D.. 
University of Maryland, 1940. 

Gibson Jackson Wells, Associate Pro- 
fessor; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 
1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1936. 

Eric L. White, Assistant in Pediatrics; 
B.S., Howard University. 1949; M.D., 
1953. 

J. Carlton Wich, Assistant; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1938; M.D., 
1943. 

Charles E. Wright, Instructor of Pedi- 
atrics; A.B., Centre College of Ken- 
tucky, 1951; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
School of Medicine, 1955. 

Robert E. Yim. Instructor; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Nevada. 1950; M.D., University 
of Maryland. 1954. 

Gino L. F. Zarbin, Assistant; M.D., 
Universita degli Studi-Milano, 1948. 



Consultants, Pediatric Central 
Evaluation Department 
Ruth Baumgartner, Psychologist. 
John F. Carter, Speech Therapist. 

Pharmacology 

Frederick Keller Bell, Research As- 
sociate; A.B.. Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1916; Ph.D., 1920. 

Harold Horn Bryant, Associate Profes- 
sor; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 
1948; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

Raymond Merritt Burgison, Professor; 
B.S.. Loyola College, 1945; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 
1950. 

C. Jelleff Carr, Adjunct Professor; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; 
M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

Helmut Freimund Cascorbi, Research 
Assistant Professor; M.D., University 
of Munich, 1955; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1962. 

Ruth D. Musser, Assistant Professor; 
B.A., Goucher College, 1917; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1931. 

John Joseph O'Neill, Associate Profes- 
sor; B.S., St. Francis College, 1942; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1953; 
Ph.D., 1955. 

Robert Sanford Rozman, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; B.S., The George Washington 
University, 1955; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 
1962. 

Edward Byrd Truitt, Jr., Professor; 
B.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1943; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

Fellows, Research Assistants, 

and Associates 

David A. Blake, Fellow 

Albert J. Dietz, Jr., Fellow 

Thomas E. Duffy, Fellow 

Gilbert Duritz, Ph.D., Research Assist- 
ant 

Ann M. Morgan, Research Assistant 

G. Allen Moulton, M.D., Research 
Fellow 

Sylvia L. Pollack, Fellow 

John F. Schaefer, Fellow 

Stuart H. Simon, Research Assistant 



Faculty (yC) 



Physiology 



William Dewey Blake, Professor of 
Physiology and Head of the Depart- 
ment; A.B., Dartmouth College, 1940; 
M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1943. 

William J. Adelman, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor; B.S., Fordham University, 1950; 
M.S., University of Vermont, 1952; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1955. 

Charles A. Barraclough, Associate 
Professor; B.S., St. Joseph's College, 
1949; M.S., Rutgers University, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

Jeanne Quinlin Barry, Instructor; B.A., 
Cornell University, 1951. 

Paul D. Coleman, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Tufts University, 1948; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1953. 

Abram B. Fajer, Assistant Professor; 
M.D., University of Sao Paulo, 1951. 

Edmund M. Glaser, Research Associate 
Professor; B.E.E., the Cooper Union, 
1949; M.S.E., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1954; D.Eng., 1960. 

Sheldon E. Greisman, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; M.D., New York University, 
1949. 

Leo M. Karpeles, Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of North Carolina, 
1941; M.D., University of Washing- 
ton, 1955. 

Jerome K. Merlis, Associate Professor; 
B.S., University of Louisville, 1933; 
M.D., 1937; M.S., 1938. 

Gabriel G. Pinter, Associate Professor; 
M.D., University Medical School, Bu- 
dapest, 1951. 

Dietrich Conrad Smith, Professor of 
Physiology Emeritus. 

Neil Solomon, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Western Reserve University, 
1954; M.D., Western Reserve Univer- 
sity School of Medicine, 1961. 



Preventive Medicine and 
Rehabilitation 

George Entwistle, Professor of Pre- 
ventive Medicine and Rehabilitation 
and Head of the Department; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, 1945; M.D., 
Boston University, 1948. 



Frederick J. Balsam, Associate in Phys- 
ical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., 
College of the City of New York, 
1931; M.D., University of Lausanne, 
Switzerland, 1938. 

Harle V. Barrett, Associate Professor 
of Preventive Medicine and Rehabili- 
tation; B.S., Oklahoma State Univer- 
sity, 1940; M.S., Kansas State College, 
1942; M.D., University of Kansas, 
1946; M.P.H., Harvard University, 
1950. 

William F. Baxter, Jr., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Rehabilitation; B.A., Guil- 
ford College, 1952; M.Ed., University 
of North Carolina, 1959. 

Eugenio E. Benitez, Instructor in Pre- 
ventive Medicine; B.S., University of 
Puerto Rico, 1951; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1955. 

Alexander S. Dowling, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Preventive Medicine; B.A., 
DePauw University, 1925; M.D., Har- 
vard University, 1930. 

Clara J. Fleischer, Assistant Processor 
of Physical Medicine and Rehabilita- 
tion; M.S. (Pharmacy) University of 
Prague, 1932; M.D., Medical College 
of Virginia, 1942. 

John E. Gessner, Instructor in Physical 
Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., 
Loyola College, 1950; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1954. 

Maureen M. Henderson, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Preventive Medicine and Re- 
habilitation; M.B.B.S., Durham Uni- 
versity, England, 1949; D.P.H., 1956. 

Marjorie H. Hendry, Assistant in Phys- 
ical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., 
University of Minnesota, 1941; M.D., 
Women's Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1953. 

Alfred Kogon, Assistant Professor of 
Preventive Medicine; B.A., Cornell 
University, 1952; M.D., New York 
University, 1956; M.P.H., Harvard 
University, 1961; Dr.P.H., Columbia 
University, 1964. 

George A. Lentz, Jr., Instructor in 
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1953; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 



yQ Faculty 



Florence I. Mahoney, Associate Profes- 
sor of Preventive Medicine and Re- 
habilitation; B.S., University of Wis- 
consin, 1927; M.S., 1930; M.D., Wom- 
en's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 
1937. 

Theresa M. Novak, Instructor in Pre- 
ventive Medicine; R.N., Georgetown 
University School of Nursing, 1947; 
B.S.N.E., University of Maryland, 
1958. 

William A. Reinke, Assistant Professor 
of Biostatistics; B.A., Kenyon College, 
1959; M.B.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1950; Ph.D., Western Reserve 
University, 1961. 

Aubrey D. Richardson, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Preventive Medicine and Re- 
habilitation; B.S., University of North 
Carolina, 1944; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1951. 

Paul F. Richardson, Associate Profes- 
sor of Physical Medicine and Rehabili- 
tation and Head, Division of Physical 
Medicine and Rehabilitation; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1950. 

Bernard H. Suffel, Instructor in Reha- 
bilitation; B.A., Montclair Teachers 
College, 1960; M.A., Seton Hall Uni- 
versity, 1964. 

Matthew Tayback, Associate Professor 
of Biostatistics; B.A., Harvard Col- 
lege, 1939; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1950; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1953. 



Psychiatry 

Eugene B. Brody, Professor of Psychia- 
try and Head of the Department; Di- 
rector, The Psychiatric Institute; A.B., 
M.A., University of Missouri, 1941; 
M.D., Harvard University, 1944. 

Saim B. Akin, Instructor in Psychiatry; 
M.D., University of Istanbul, 1954. 

Mary J. Albright, Instructor in Medical 
Psychology; B.A., St. Mary of the 
Springs College, 1954; M.A., Fordham 
University, 1956. 

A. Russell Anderson, Associate Clini- 
cal Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1929; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1933. 



Harriett Aronson, Research Assistant 
Professor of Psychology; B.A., Doug- 
lass College, 1951; M.S., Purdue Uni- 
versity, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

Eduard Ascher, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry; B.S., Washington 
University, 1942. 

Raymond I. Band, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., George 
Washington University, 1945; M.D., 
1948. 

Leo H. Bartemeier, Clinical Professor 
of Psychiatry; B.A., Catholic Univer- 
sity of America, 1914; M.A., 1916; 
M.D., Georgetown Medical School, 
1920. 

Murray Bowen, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Tennes- 
see, 1934; M.D., 1937. 

Norman H. Bradford, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medical Psychology; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1956; Ph.D., 
1964. 

Monique C. Braude, Research Associate 
in Psychiatry; Pharmacy Diploma, 
University of Paris, 1948; M.S., Ohio 
State University, 1954; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1963. 

George P. Brown, Assistant Professor 
in Psychiatry; B.S., Howard Univer- 
sity, 1940; M.D., 1944. 

James E. Carson, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., Clemson University, 
1947; M.D., Medical College of South 
Carolina, 1952. 

Raymond L. Clemmens, Assitant Pro- 
fessor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry, As- 
sociate Professor of Pediatrics; B.S., 
Loyola College, 1947; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1951. 

Jess Victor Cohn, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Cin- 
cinnati, 1931; M.B., 1933; M.D., 1934. 

Roberto A. Q. Correa, Research Assist- 
ant in Psychiatry; Ciencias e Letras, 
Colegio Pedro, Brazil, 1955; M.D., 
National Medical School of Univer- 
sity of Brazil, 1963. 

Joseph R. Cowen, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Chicago 
and Johns Hopkins; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1950. 



Faculty H J 



Jurema A. Cunha, Research Associate; 
B.A., Faculdade de Filosofia da Uni- 
versidade do Rio Grande do Sul, 1949; 
M.A., 1950; Ph.D., Institute de Psi- 
cologia da Pontificia University (At- 
clica do Rio Grande do Sul, 1956). 

Nathan M. Davis, Instructor in Psy- 
chiatry; B.A., University of Chicago, 
1950; M.D., University of Chicago, 
1957. 

Robert L. Derbyshire, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Sociology in Psychiatry; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 
1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

Kay Donahoe, Psychiatric Social 
Worker; M.S.W., Catholic University 
of America, 1960. 

Richard H. Doss, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; Pre-med., Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1943; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, 1948. 

Myron Eichler, Research Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry; B.S., Tulane Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.D., New York Medi- 
cal College, 1954. 

Elmar Einberg, Research Associate in 
Psychiatry; E.E., Netzlers Institute of 
Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 
1950; B.Sc in England; Degree in Me- 
chanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1962. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, Jr., Professor of 
Law in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1934; LL.B., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1940; LL.M., Har- 
vard Law School, 1947. 

Kurt Rudi Fiedler, Instructor in Psy- 
chiatry; B.A., University of Berlin, 
1949; M.D., 1953. 

Jack D. Findley, Research Associate 
Professor of Pychology in Department 
of Psychiatry; B.A., Baylor University, 
1950: Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1954. 

Rolfe B. Finn, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; M.D., Ch.B., University of 
Otago, N. Z., 1950; D.P.M., Conjoint 
Examining Board of England, 1957. 

William N. Fitzpatrick, Clinical In- 
structor in Psychiatry; B.S., Mercer 
University, 1941; M.D., Emory Uni- 
versity, 1944. 



Irving A. Forster, Jr., Instructor in 
Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Loras 
College, 1954; M.S.W., Loyola Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1956. 

Jacob Frankel, Assistant in Medical 
Psychology; B.A., Boston University, 
1954; M.A., 1959. 

Anita K. Gilbert, Research Instructor 
in Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., 
Goucher College, 1942; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1946. 

Kurt Glaser, Clinical Instructor in Psy- 
chiatry; M.S., University of Illinois, 
1949; M.D., University of Lausanne, 
1939. 

Israel Goldiamond, Research Associate 
Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1942; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1955. 

Harry Goldmann, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1916. 

Bernard S. Gordon, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; A.B., University of 
Michigan, 1937; M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1942. 

Robert G. Grenell, Professor of Neu- 
robiology in Psychiatry; B.S., College 
of the City of New York, 1935; M.S., 
New York University, 1936; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1943. 

Alfred Gross, Assistant Professor of 
Medical Psychology; B.S.S., City Col- 
lege of New York, 1949; M.S., 1953; 
Ph.D., Adelphi University, 1962. 

Gertrude M. Gross, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; M.D., Basel University, 
1935. 

George A. Gutches, Jr., Instructor in 
Psychiatric Social Work; B.S., Michi- 
gan State University, 1959; M.S.W., 
University of Maryland, 1964. 

Manfred S. Guttmacher, Associate 
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919; M.D., 
1923. 

William M. Harris, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; A.B., University of West 
Virginia, 1941; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1943. 

Jerome Hartz, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1933; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1937. 



70 Faculty 



Hidebumi Hazama, Research Fellow in 
the Department of Neurobiology in 
Psychiatry; B.M., Kyushu University, 
1955; D.M., 1961. 

Irene L. Hitchman, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; B.S., Maedchen Real- 
gymnasium, 1927; M.D., University of 
Innsbruck, 1933. 

William Holden, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., Marquette University, 
1948; M.D., 1952. 

William L. Holder, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; A.B., Emory University, 
1949; M.D., -University of Maryland, 
1953. 

Edmund S. Howe, Research Associate 
Professor in Medical Psychology; B.S., 
Manchester University, 1950; Ph.D., 
University College, London, 1952. 

Virginia Huffer, Associate Professor of 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D., 1950. 

Barbara Hulfish, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.A., American University, 
1944; M.D., University of Rochester, 
1952. 

Mabel B. Ingraham, Faculty Research 
Assistant in Child Psychiatry; A.B., 
Berea College, 1945; R.N., Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, 1948; B.S., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1949; M.A., New 
York University, 1963. 

Daniel F. Johnston, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; A.B., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1952; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1956. 

Dennis T. Jones, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., Wake Forest College, 
1950; M.D., Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, 1953. 

Gerald D. Klee, Associate Professor of 
Psychiatry; M.D., Harvard University, 
1952. 

Werner A. Kohlmeyer, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry; M.D., University 
of Goettingen, 1942; Pipl. in Psychia- 
try, McGill University, 1953. 

Morton Kramer, Lecturer in Epidemi- 
ology in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1934; Sc.D., 1939. 

Morton D. Kramer, Research Associate 
in Psychiatry; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1955. 



Irene S. Krishnappa, Psychiatric Social 
Worker I; B.S., Ohio State University, 
1959; M.S.W., Howard University, 
1961. 

Lawrence S. Kubie, Clinical Professor 
of Psychiatry; A.B., Harvard, 1916; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 

Ephraim T. Lisansky, Associate Clinical 
Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1937. 

Leon A. Levin, Assistant Professor of 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Wis- 
consin, 1952; M.D., 1956. 

Harvey A. Lewis, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., Manhattan College, 
1952; M.D., Georgetown University, 
1956. 

James B. Mackie, Assistant Professor of 
Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; 
B.A., University of Utah, 1955; M.A., 
1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

William W. Magruder, Assistant Clin- 
ical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Mis- 
sissippi State College, 1942; M.D., 
Duke University, 1944. 

Jean M. Marsh, Research Associate in 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Ne- 
braska, 1952; M.S., 1956; Ph.D. 1960. 

Sally R. McClure, Faculty Research 
Assistant; B.S., University of Tennes- 
see, School of Nursing, 1959; M.A., 
New York University, 1963. 

Cecelia McCue, Instructor in Psychi- 
atric Social Work; A.B., West Virginia 
University, 1929; M.A., University of 
Chicago, 1950. 

John D. McQueen, Research Consultant 
in Neurosurgery, Neurobiology La- 
boratory; M.D., University of To- 
ronto, 1946; M.A., 1950. 

Russell R. Monroe, Professor of Psy- 
chiatry; B.S., Yale University, 1942; 
M.D., 1944. 

Thurman Mott, Jr., Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; B.S., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.D., 1952. 

Joseph Noshpitz, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry; B.A., University 
of Louisville, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

Jean C. O'Connor, Instructor in Psychi- 
atry; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1951; M.D., 1954. 



Faculty 7Q 



Anatol H. Oleynick, Clinical Instruc- 
tor in Neurology in Psychiatry; B.A., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1952; 
M.D., University of Chicago School 
of Medicine, 1956. 

Frederick E. Phillips, Clinical Instruc- 
tor in Psychiatry; A.S., Eveleth Junior 
College, 1941; M.D., Wayne Univer- 
sity, 1946. 

Benjamin Pope, Associate Professor of 
Medical Psychology; B.S., University 
of Manitoba, 1955; B.Ed., 1941; Ph.D., 
University of California, 1950. 

Roland Queene, Teacher III; B.S., 
Maryland State Teacher's College, 
1951; M.Ed., Loyola College, 1962. 

Francis T. Rafferty, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry, Director, Child 
Psychiatry; B.S., St. Mary's College; 
M.D., St. Louis University, 1948; 
M.S., University of Colorado, 1953. 

Jack Raher, Research Assistant Profes- 
sor of Psychiatry; B.A., Vanderbilt 
University, 1943; M.S., University of 
Cincinnati, 1948; M.D., University of 
Geneva, Switzerland, 1953. 

Julian W. Reed, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1948; M.D., 1952. 

John R. Reid, Professor of Philosophy 
in Psychiatry; Ph.D., University of 
California, 1936. 

Joseph J. Reidy, Associate in Psychi- 
atry; M.D., Loyola University, Chi- 
cago, 1948. 

Harvey A. Robinson, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medical Psychology; A.B., Har- 
vard University, 1938; A.M., 1940; 
Ed.D., 1948. 

Kent E. Robinson, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, 1943; M.D., 
1947. 

Lindbergh S. Sata, Assistant Professor 
of Psychiatry; B.S., University of 
Utah, 1951; M.D., University of Utah 
College of Medicine, 1958; M.S., 1964. 

Carl B. Schleifer, Assistant Professor 
of Psychiatry; B.S., University of 
Florida, 1950; M.D., 1951; M.D., 
Emory University, 1955. 

Nathan Schnaper, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Wash- 
ington College, 1940; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1949. 



Winfield Scott, Assistant Professor of 
Medical Psychology; B.S., Penn State 
University, 1954; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 
1958. 

Aaron W. Siegman, Research Associate 
Professor of Medical Psychology; B.A., 
City College of New York, 1952; 
M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1954; 
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1957. 

Charles W. Stewart, Clinical Instruc- 
tor in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1943; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryand, 1945. 

Jerome Styrt, Clinical Instructor in 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Chi- 
cago, 1940; M.D., 1945. 

Robert E. Trattner, Clinical Instructor 
in Psychiatry; D.D.S., Western Reserve 
University, 1945; A.B., 1947; M.D., 
University of Chicago, 1951. 

Is adore Tuerk, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor in Psychiatry; B.S., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1930; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1934. 

Robert M. Vidaver, Assistant Professor 
of Psychiatry; A.B., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1953; M.D., State University of 
New York, 1956. 

Lutz H. von Nuehlen, Clinical Instruc- 
tor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of 
Frankfurt, 1954; M.D., University of 
Munich, 1958. 

Roger S. Waterman, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Bethany 
College, 1948; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 

Walter Weintraub, Associate Professor 
of Psychiatry; B.A., New York Uni- 
versity, 1948; M.D., University of 
Geneva, 1951. 

Maxwell N. Weisman, Clinical Instruc- 
tor in Psychiatry; B.A., College of City 
of New York, 1930; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1931; M.D., University of 
Amsterdam, 1958. 

Otto A. Will, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry; A.B., Stanford 
University, 1933; M.D., 1940. 

Karl Wilson, Teacher II, Child Psy- 
chiatry Service; B.S., Morgan State 
College, 1954; M.Ed., Loyola College, 
1965. 

Samuel P. Wise, Research Associate in 
Psychiatry; A.B., Emory University, 
1941; M.D., Tulane University, 1946. 



H^ Faculty 



Imogene Young, Associate Professor of 
Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Sophie 
Newcomb College, 1933; M.S.W., Tu- 
lane University, 1935. 

Fellows, Research Assistants 

and Associates 

Bernice Bass, Assistant in Psychiatric 

Social Work. 
Robert Brown, Medical Psychologist. 
Samuel Novey, Consultant in Psychiatry. 
Lydia O'Neill, Research Assistant. 
Betty C. Overall, Psychiatric Social 

Worker. 
Joan Young, Research Assistant. 

Radiology 

John Murray Dennis, Professor of Ra- 
diology and Head of the Department; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
M.D., 1945. 

Fernando Germano Bloedorn, Profes- 
sor of Radiology and Head, Division 
of Radiation Therapy; M.D., Univer- 
sity del Litoral, Rosario, Argentina, 
1936. 

Carlo Allesandro Cuccia, Associate 
Professor; M.D., University of Milano, 
Italy, 1948. 

Charles Nuckols Davidson, Professor 
of Clinical Radiology; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Virginia, 1938. 

John Berkley Hearn, Associate Profes- 
sor; M.B., B.S., Middlesex Hospital, 
London, 1947; D.M.R.D., 1952; 
F.F.R., 1955. 

Nathan Bernard Hyman, Instructor; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 

James Alfred Lyon, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor; A.A., Princeton University, 
1944; M.D., Long Island College of 
Medicine, 1947. 

Efrain Navarro, Instructor; B.M., Uni- 
versidad Autonamade Mexico, 1953. 

Marion Charles Restivo, Instructor; 
A.B., Loyola College, 1953; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1957. 

James Eugene Robinson, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Radiology and Head, Section 
of Physics and Radiobiology; B.S., 
Utah State Agricultural College, 1947; 
M.A., Washington University, 1949; 
Ph.D., 1955. 



Gunter Horst Seydel, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; M.D., University of Frankfurt, 
Germany, 1955; M.S., Wayne State 
University College of Medicine, 1961. 

William Nathanil Thomas, Instructor, 
M.D., University of Virginia, 1942. 

William H. Wallop, Instructor; A.A., 
Princeton University, 1949; M.D., Co- 
lumbia University, 1949. 

Morris Joseph Wizenberg, Assistant 
Professor; M.D., University of To- 
ronto, 1953. 

Donald Anthony Wolfel, Associate 
Professor; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1949; M.D., 1952. 



Surgery 



Robert William Buxton, Professor of 
Surgery and Head of the Department; 
A.B., Kansas University, 1931; M.D., 
1936; M.S., University of Michigan, 
1943. 

George A. Abeshouse, Instructor in 
Urology; A.B., Yale University, 1952; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 

Robert Calvin Abrams, Instructor in 
Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1935; M.D., 1939. 

Thurston R. Adams, Associate Profes- 
sor of Surgery; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1934. 

George Carl Alderman, Instructor in 
Otolaryngology; B.S., Loyola College, 
1948; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1952. 

James Givens Arnold, Jr., Professor of 
Neurological Surgery and Head, Divi- 
sion of Neurological Surgery; B.A., 
University of North Carolina, 1925; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1929. 

Safuh Attar, Assistant Professor of 
Thoracic Surgery; B.A., Makassed Col- 
lege, 1943; M.D., American Univer- 
sity, Beirut, Lebanon, 1947. 

Henry V. Belcher, Instructor in Sur- 
gery; B.A., University of Virginia, 
1948; M.D., Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, 1952. 
Robert Z. Berry, Associate in Otolaryn- 
gology; B.A., University of West Vir- 
ginia, 1941; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1943. 



Faculty H^L 



Otto C. Beyer, Instructor in Urology; 
B.S., Loyola College, 1951; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1955. 

Harold Paul Biehl, Assistant in Sur- 
gery; A.B., Western Maryland College, 
1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

Emil Blair, Assistant Professor, Thor- 
acic Surgery; M.S., University of 
Colorado, 1958; M.D., Medical Col- 
lege of Georgia, 1946. 

Cyrus L. Blanchard, Professor of Oto- 
laryngology and Head, Division of 
Otolaryngology; B.A., Clark Univer- 
sity, 1943; M.D., George Washington 
University, 1946. 

Henry Francis Bongardt, Assistant 
Professor of Surgery; B.S., Creighton 
University, 1919; M.D.^ 1919. 

Paul Bormel, Instructor in Urology; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; 
M.D., 1957. 

Harry Clay Bowie, Assistant Professor 
of Surgery; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1932; M.D., 1936. 

Otto Charles Brantigan, Professor of 
Surgery; B.S., Northwestern Univer- 
sity, 1931; M.D., 1934. 

Henry Alison Briele, Associate in Post- 
graduate Surgery; Ph.G., University of 
Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1939. 

Harold Bubert Burns, Associate in 
Surgery; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1936. 

Edward W. Campbell, Jr., Instructor 
in Urology; A.B., Amherst College, 
1954; M.D., Hahnemann Medical Col- 
lege, 1958. 

Michele T. Cerino, Instructor in Thor- 
acic Surgery; M.D., University of Pisa 
Medical School, 1955; M.S., McGill 
University, 1963. 

John W. Chambers, Instructor in Sur- 
gery; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1939; M.D., 1943. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., As- 
sociate Professor of Surgery, Emeritus. 

Richard C. Coblentz, Clinical Profes- 
sor Neurological Surgery; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1914; M.D., 1918. 

Wilford Anderson Hall Councill, 
Jr., Instructor in Urology; B.S., David- 
son College, 1942; M.D., University of 
Virginia, 1947. 



E. Eugene Covington, Assistant Profes- 
sor in Oncology; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1927. 

R. Adams Cowley, Professor of Thor- 
acic Surgery and Head, Division of 
Thoracic Surgery; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1944. 

Everard F. Cox, Assistant Professor of 
Surgery; B.S., University of Utah, 
1951; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

Robert M. N. Crosby, Associate in 
Neurological Surgery; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1943. 

Richard J. Cross, Associate in Otolaryn- 
gology; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 
1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1946. 

Raymond M. Cunningham, Instructor 
in Surgery; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; 
University of Maryland, 1939. 

Michael L. DeVincentis, Instructor in 
Surgery; B.S., Loyola College, 1937; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 

Liebe Sokol Diamond, Instructor in Or- 
thopedic Surgery; A.B., Smith College, 
1951; M.D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1955. 

William Charles Dunnigan, Assistant 
in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1931; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

Frank Philip Dwyer, Jr., Assistant in 
Otolaryngology; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 

Monte Edwards, Clinical Professor of 
Surgery; M.R.C.S. (England), L.R.C.P. 
(London), St. Thomas's Hospital Med- 
ical School, 1917. 

Milton L. Engnoth, Instructor in Oto- 
laryngology; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1953; M.D., 1957. 

William C. Esmond, Assistant Professor 
in Surgery; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D., 1951. 

Lee Kendall Fargo, Associate in Urol- 
ogy; M.D., Baltimore College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, 1915. 

C. Thomas Flotte, Associate Professor 
of Surgery; B.S., Franklin and Mar- 
shall College, 1943; M.D., Jefferson 
Medical College, 1946. 

Earl Potter Galleher, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Urology; A.B., Princeton 
University, 1949; M.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1953. 



Hf± Faculty 



William Lynnewood Garlick, Associ- 
ate Professor of Thoracic Surgery; 
A.B., Emory University, 1933; M.D., 
George Washington University, 1937. 

Jason H. Gaskel, Associate in Orthope- 
dic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1930; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1934. 

James J. Gerlach, Assistant in Otolaryn- 
gology; A.B., Colorado College, 1943; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Francis W. Gillis, Assistant Professor 
of Urology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1927. . 

Robert Bruce Goldstein, Instructor in 
Urology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1954. 

Louis E. Goodman, Instructor in Sur- 
gery; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1938. 

George Govatos, Assistant Proessor of 
Surgery; A.B., Boston College, 1926; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1930. 

George Herbert Greenstein, Instruc- 
tor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1941; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950. 

John S. Haines, Assistant Professor of 
Urology; A.B., Washington and Lee 
University, 1934; M.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1938. 

Leonard Gerard Hamberry, Assistant 
in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1940; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

Robert Fairbank Healy, Instructor in 
Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1930; M.D., 1934. 

Donald B. Hebb, Assistant in Surgery; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, Associate in 
Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1927; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 

Charles Morgan Henderson, Instructor 
in Neurological Surgery; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1955; M.D., 
1957. 

Thelma Hilger, Instructor in Audi- 
ology; B.A., University of Iowa, 1950; 
M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952. 

John H. Hirschfeld, Instructor in Oto- 
laryngology; M.D., University of Vi- 
enna, 1938. 



John Francis Hogan, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Urology; M.D., College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons of Baltimore, 
1911. 

John Francis Hogan, Jr., Instructor in 
Urology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1947. 

William Addison Holbrook, Assistant 
in Surgery; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1942; M.D., 1945. 

T. Brannon Hubbard, Jr., Asistant Pro- 
fessor of Surgery; B.A., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1938; M.D., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1942; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota, 1952. 

Harry Clay Hull, Professor of Clinical 
Surgery; M.C., University of Mary- 
land, 1932. 

Benjamin Herbert Isaacs, Assistant 
Professor of Otolaryngology; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1932; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1936. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of 
Clinical Surgery, Emeritus. 

Everett, D. Jones, Instructor in Ortho- 
pedic Surgery; B.S., Western Maryland 
College, 1938; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1927. 

Clyde F. Karns, Instructor in Surgery; 
B.S., St. John's College, 1922; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1927. 

Fayne A. Kayser, Associate Professor of 
Otolaryngology; B.S., University of 
West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1927. 

Edward Andrew Kitlowski, Clinical 
Professor of Plastic Surgery; B.S., 
Bucknell University, 1917; M.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1921. 

Howard Calvin Kramer, Instructor in 
Urology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1951. 

Frederick T. Kyper, Assoociate Profes- 
sor of Otolaryngology; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1923. 

Henry E. Langenfelder, Assistant in 
Surgery; B.A., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1947; M.D., Hahnemann Medi- 
cal College, 1951. 

John Douglas LeBouvier, Instructor in 
Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., London Uni- 
versity, 1952; M.B., 1952. 

Eugene Joseph Linberg, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Thoracic Surgery; A.B., Duke 
University, 1944; M.D., 1948. 



Faculty HH 



F. Ford Loker, Associate in Surgery; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; 
M.D., 1940. 

William B. Long, Associate in Post- 
graduate Surgery; B.S., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1940; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1943. 

William Dawson Lynn, Instructor in 
Surgery; B.A., University of Maryland, 
1934; M.D., 1937. 

Nicholas Mallis, Instructor in Urology; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

Arlie R. Mansberger, Jr., Associate 
Profesor of Surgery; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1947. 

Isadore Maseritz, Assistant Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1924. 

Howard Brooks Mays, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Urology; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1935. 

Howard B. McElwain, Assistant in Sur- 
gery; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1919. 

William Raymond McKenzie, Assistant 
Professor of Otolaryngology; M.D., 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Baltimore, 1915. 

Karl Frederick Mech, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Surgery; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1932; M.D., 1935. 

Thomas Dickson Michael, Assistant in 
Otolaryngology; M.D., Jefferson Medi- 
cal College, 1949. 

Moritz Michaelis, Assistant Professor 
of Surgery; Ph.D., University of Wurz- 
burg, 1934. 

Elliott Michaelson, Instructor in Tho- 
racic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1930; M.D., 1935. 

Lyle Jordan Millan, Associate in Urol- 
ogy; M.D., George Washington Uni- 
versity, 1921. 

John E. Miller, Instructor in Surgery; 
B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 
1938; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 
1942. 

Joseph M. Miller, Associate in Surgery; 
A.B., Columbia University, 1931; 
M.D., University of Minnesota, 1939. 

Kirk Moore, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., 
Princeton University, 1941; M.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1944. 



John Duer Moores, Instructor in Sur- 
gery; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 
1931; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1932. 

William H. Mosberg, Jr., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Neurological Surgery; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 
1944. 

Ralph D. Natale, Instructor in Oto- 
laryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1955; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1959. 

James Wharton Nelson, Professor of 
Clinical Surgery; A.B, St. John's Col- 
lege, 1918; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1925. 

Neil Novin, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., 
New York University, 1951; M.D., 
State University of New York, 1955. 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, Professor of 
Otolaryngology; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1921. 

Frank Joseph Otenasek, Instructor in 
Neurological Surgery; A.B., Loyola 
College, 1933; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1937. 

A. Gibson Packard, Assistant in Ortho- 
pedic Surgery; B.A., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1950; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1954. 

Clarence W. Peake, Associate Professor 
of Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1927. 

Daniel James Pessagno, Professor of 
Clinical Surgery; B.A., Rock Hill Col- 
lege, 1916; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1920. 

Patrick Carey Phelan, Jr., Associate in 
Surgery; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 

Ross Z. Pierpont, Assistant in Surgery; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; 
M.D., 1940. 

Frederick W. Plugge, IV, Instructor in 
Surgery; A.B., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1953; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1957. 

Harry Primrose Porter, Assistant in 
Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1939; M.D., 1943. 

James Richard Powder, Instructor in 
Urology; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1949; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1953. 



7Q Faculty 



John M. Rehberger, Assistant in Oto- 
laryngology; B.S., Loyola College, 
1940; M.D., New York Medical Col- 
lege, 1947. 
Charles A. Reifschneider, Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Traumatic Surgery; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1916. 
Herbert E. Reifschneider, Associate 
in Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1922; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1927. 
William Benjamin Rever, Jr., Associ- 
ate in Surgery; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1950. 
Benjamin Sunderland Rich, Associate 
Professor of Otolaryngology; B.A., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1923; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1928. 
William F. Rienhoff, Jr., Assistant 
Professor of Surgery; B.A., Cornell 
University, 1915; M.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1919. 
Martin Albert Robbins, Associate in 
Urology; A.B., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1939; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1943. 
Harry L. Rogers, Clinical Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1915. 
John David Rosin, Associate in Surgery; 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1938; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1942; 
M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952. 
C. Parke Scarborough, Clinical Asso- 
ciate Professor of Plastic Surgery; B.S., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1933; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
John F. Schaefer, Instructor in Surgery; 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1934; 
B.S., 1936; M.D., 1938. 
Irving Scherlis, Assistant in Urology; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1940; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 
Theodore Allison Schwartz, Assistant 
Professor of Otolaryngology; Ph.G., 
University of Maryland, 1930; B.S., 
1932; M.D., 1934. 
William Booth Settle, Associate in 
Surgery; A.B., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1930; M.D., 1933. 
John Oliver Sharrett, Instructor in 
Neurological Surgery; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1952. 



E. Roderick Shipley, Associate in Sur- 
gery; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1942. 
Arthur George Siwinski, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Surgery; A. B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1927; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1931. 
John Craig Stauffer, Research Assist- 
ant Professor of Surgery; A.B., Prince- 
ton University, 1949; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1953. 
Edwin Harvey Stewart, Jr., Associate 
in Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1943. 
Frederick Louis Stichel, Jr., Assistant 
in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1944. 
William Joseph Supik, Associate in 
Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1940; M.D., 1940. 
John J. Tansey, Associate in Orthopedic 
Surgery; A.B., Brown University, 1942; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 
Norman Tarr, Instructor in Surgery; 
B.S., Washington College, 1944; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1948. 
Raymond K. Thompson, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Neurological Surgery; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1937; M.D., 
1941. 
Morris Tischler, Research Associate in 
Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1950; M.H., 1952. 
T. Joseph Touhey, Assistant in Surgery; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1923. 
W. Houston Toulson, M.D., Professor 

of Urology, Emeritus. 
I. Ridgeway Trimble, Professor of Clini- 
cal Surgery; B.A., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1922; M.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1926. 
Allen Fiske Vochell, Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1915; M.D., 
1919. 
William Wallace Walker, Associate 
Professor of Surgery; B.S., University 
of West Virginia, 1921; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1923. 
Arthur Thomas Ward, Jr., Associate in 
Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1933; M.D., 1939. 



Faculty *7Q 



Israel Howard Weiner, Instructor in 
Neurological Surgery; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1949; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1953. 

Harold R. Weiss, Instructor in Ortho- 
pedic Surgery; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1952; M.D., 1954. 

Edward F. Wenzlaff, Assistant in 
Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Columbia 
College, 1948; M.D., University of 
Buffalo, 1954. 

John P. White, III, Instructor in Sur- 
gery; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

Alfred K. Wiedman, Professor in 
Orthopedic Surgery; M.D., University 
of Heidelberg, 1956. 

Milton J. Wilder, Assistant Professor 
of Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1933; M.D., 1939. 

David Reid Will, Instructor in Surgery; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of 
Surgery, Emeritus. 

Austin H. Wood, Assistant in Urology, 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1914. 

John M. Workman, Assistant Professor 
for Research, Thoracic Surgery; B.S., 
Oxford University, 1944; B.M., B. 
Chem., University College Hospital, 
London, 1947. 

George Herschel Yeager, Professor of 
Clinical Surgery; B.S., University of 
West Virginia, 1927; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1929. 

John David Young, Jr., Professor of 
Urology and Head, Division of Uro~ 
logical Surgery; B.A., Bridgewater 
College, 1938; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1941. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Professor of 
Otolaryngology, Emeritus. 



Consultants, Fellows, Research 
Fellows, and Research Assistants 

John A. Beech, Research Associate in 
Thoracic Surgery. 

Donald E. Gregg, Consultant in Tho- 
racic Surgery. 

Ilse H. Hawthorne, Research Assistant 
in Thoracic Surgery. 

Bomi N. Irani, Research Fellow in Tho- 
racic Surgery. 

William H. Kirby, Jr., Research Associ- 
ate in Thoracic Surgery. 

Kenneth M. Klatt, Research Fellow in 
Thoracic Surgery. 

Melvin H. Knisely, Consultant in Tho- 
racic Surgery. 

Setsu Komatsu, Research Fellow in 

Thoracic Surgery. 
David N. Kramer, Research Associate in 

Surgery. 

Ceslovas Masaitis, Research Associate 

in Thoracic Surgery. 
Paulo P. Mendonca, Research Fellow 

in Urology. 
G. Allen Moulton, Research Assistant 

in Thoracic Surgery. 

Robert M. Ollodart, Research Associ- 
ate in Thoracic Surgery. 

Dorcas H. Padget, Research Associate 
in Neurosurgery. 

Vincent E. Sheehan, Research Assistant 
in Thoracic Surgery. 

Manfred Strauch, Research Fellow m 
Thoracic Surgery. 

Andrew de Korossy Szabo, Research 
Assistant in Thoracic Surgery. 

George Bennett Thompson, Research 
Assistant in Thoracic Surgery. 



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Organization of the Curriculum 
and Courses of Instruction 



Anatomy 83 

Anesthesiology 85 

Art as Applied to Medicine .85 

Biological Chemistry 85 

Biophysics 86 

International Medicine 88 

Medicine 89 

Arthritis 91 

Cardiology 91 

Clinical Pathology 92 

Dermatology 92 

Endocrinology and 

Metabolism 93 

Gastroenterology 93 

Hypertension and Renal 

Disease 94 

Infectious Diseases 94 

Physical Diagnosis 94 

Pulmonary Diseases 94 

Microbiology 95 

Neurology 97 



Obstetrics and Gynecology . 98 

Ophthalmology 98 

Pathology 99 

Neuropathology 100 

Forensic Pathology 100 

Pediatrics 101 

Pharmacology 102 

Physiology 103 

Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 104 

Physical Medicine 105 

Psychiatry 105 

Radiology 107 

Surgery 108 

General Surgery 108 

Neurosurgery 109 

Orthopedic 109 

Otolaryngology 109 

Thoracic 110 

Urology 110 



81 




} 



/ 






»A-^* 



Anatomy QQ 

► ANATOMY 

Professors: figge (head of department), brantigan, krahl, and 

LEVEQUE. 

Associate Professors: mech and walker. 

Assistant Professors: crispens, polley, ramsey, settle, wadsworth, 

AND WELLS. 

Instructors: anilane, atkins, cerino, donati, ebbesson, linhardt, mc- 

FADDEN, AND NOVIN. 

Associates: bowie, pierpont, and reifschneider. 

Anat. 101. Gross Anatomy. (272)* 

First year, first semester. This course gives the student an opportunity 
to develop a basic concept of the morphology of the human body. It 
is closely interwoven with the study of neuroanatomy, microanatomy, 
and embryology, and some time is devoted to roentgen anatomy. The 
entire human body is dissected. 

Anat. 102. Microanatomy. (178) 

First year, first semester. The course presents an integrated study of 
the histology and embryology of the human body. An attempt is made 
to correlate this with gross anatomy as well as other subjects in the 
medical curriculum. Special emphasis is placed on the dynamic and 
functional aspects of the subjects. 

Anat. 103. Neuroanatomy. (116) 

First year, first semester. The study of the detailed anatomy of the 
central nervous system is coordinated with structure and function of 
the entire nervous system. The dissection of the human brain and 
the examination of stained microscopic sections of various levels of 
the brain stem are required. 

Anat. 104. Clinical Anatomy. (96) Elective 
Second year, second semester. The course is designed to bridge the 
gap between basic anatomy and clinical or applied anatomy. The study 
of surface anatomy is correlated with physical diagnosis. Students have 
an opportunity to perform a detailed anatomical dissection with em- 
phasis upon clinical application. Laboratory fee, nonmedical students, 
$25.00. 

Anat. 105. Genetics. (17) 

First year, first semester. This course consists of a series of one-hour 

lectures which include a consideration of the principles of genetics, 

population genetics, biochemical genetics, radiation genetics, immuno- 

genetics, and microbial genetics. Special emphasis is placed on the 

importance, understanding, and application of genetics to health and 

disease. 



The number of credit hours is indicated by the number in parentheses. 



ftzL Anatomy 

Anat. 106. Correlative Anatomy. (17) Elective 
Each week during the first year anatomy course, patients will be 
demonstrated and the anatomical features of the case will be stressed 
to give the student a concept of the relationship of the anatomy to 
clinical subjects. While there are no examinations in this course the 
examinations in the other courses in anatomy will involve questions 
on the material presented. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are 
the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

Anat. 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body. (9) 
Same course as Anat. 101, but on a more advanced level. It can be 
taken by graduate as well as postgraduate students. Laboratory fee, 
S25.00, (Figge, Staff) 

Anat. 202. Microanatomy. (6) 

Same course as Anat. 102, but on a more advanced level. Laboratory 
fee, $15.00. (Figge, Leveque, Chrispens) 

Anat. 203. Human Neuroanatomy. (4) 
Same course as Anat. 103, but with additional work of a more ad- 
vanced nature. Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Figge, Wells, Ebner, Staff) 

Anat. 204. Clinical Anatomy. (4) 

Same course as Anat. 104, but on a more advanced level. Laboratory 

fee, $25.00. (Figge, Brantigan, Staff) 

Anat. 205. Genetics. (2) 

Same course as Anat. 105, but on a more advanced level. (Crispens) 

Anat. 206. Correlative Anatomy. (1) 

Same course at Anat. 106, but examination will be given. 

(Figge, Staff) 

Anat. 207. Fetal and Infant Anatomy. (2) 
Fifteen periods of three hours each, every Thursday from 2:00 to 
5:00 p.m. during the second semester. This course is open to graduate 
students and postgraduates interested in pediatrics. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. (Krahl) 

Anat. 208. Studies on Normal and Atypical Growth. (2) 
Lectures in problems of growth. Two hours per week, time to be 
arranged. Sixteen weeks. (Figge) 

Anat. 209. Morphological Microtechniques. (2) 
Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week for 
one semester. The aim of this course is to study the theoretical and 
practical applications of a variety of microanatomical techniques and 
their utilization in research. Time to be arranged. (Leveque) 



Anesthesiology, Art as Applied to Medicine, Biological Chemistry gCJ 

Anat. 210. Special Problems in Neuroanatomy. (2) 
This course will deal with specific problems in the field of neuroanato- 
my, depending on the interests of the sponsor. It will consist of lec- 
tures, seminars, and specific laboratory assignments. 

(Figge, Wells, Ebner) 

Anat. 399. Research in Anatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Research work may be taken in 

any one of the branches of anatomy. (Figge, Staff) 

► ANESTHESIOLOGY 

Professor: helrich (head of department). 

Associate Professors: gold, hollingsworth, and staff. 

During the first two years, the Department of Anesthesiology pre- 
sents several lectures in the courses taught by the various preclinical de- 
partments. These lectures are intended to illustrate the application of the 
basic sciences to the clinical practice of anesthesiology. Emphasis is 
placed upon the physiologic and pharmacologic aspects of preanesthetic 
medication, choice of anethesia, and management of patients during surgery. 

Anes. 101. Introduction to Anesthesiology. 
Third year. The third year class is given a series of one hour lectures 
dealing with preoperative preparation and inhalation, local and spinal 
anesthesia. An effort is made to correlate the basic sciences with 
their clinical application. 

Anes. 102. Introduction to Anesthesiology. 
Fourth year. Each senior student spends two weeks in the operating 
rooms of the University Hospital or one of its affiliated hospitals ad- 
ministering anesthesia. Informal group meetings are held to empha- 
size factors affecting the anesthetic management of patients and to 
discuss pertinent anesthetic problems. The students also attend the 
regularly scheduled staff conferences in Anesthesiology. 

► ART AS APPLIED TO MEDICINE 

William John T. Austin, Supervisor of Medical Art; Thomas M. Stev- 
enson, Jr., Assistant. 

This Department is maintained to supply visual teaching aids in the 
form of lantern slides, graphic charts, medical drawings, and a limited 
number of motion pictures showing clinical and surgical techniques. 

► BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor: adams (head of department) and bessman (part time). 
Associate Professors: emery, pomerantz, and stevens. 
Assistant Professors: bode, ganis (part time), and layne (part time). 
Instructors: brown, gryder, and rosso. 

Biochem. 101. Principles of Biochemistry. (240) 

First year, second semester. A general introduction to biochemistry 



Q/^ Biophysics 

with emphasis on basic chemistry of biologically important molecules, 
enzymes, intermediary metabolism, metabolic regulation, and molecu- 
lar biology. Features of mammalian biochemistry are stressed but 
general and comparative aspects are considered. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate degree offered by the Department of Biological Chemis- 
try is the Doctor of Philosophy. 

Biochem. 201. Principles of Biochemistry. (8) 
Same as Biochem. 101. 

Biochem. 202, 203. Special Topics in Biochemistry (2,2) 
A series of lectures on topics of current interests in biochemistry. 
Coverage varies from year to year. Subjects reviewed in 1964-1965 
included nucleic acid biochemistry, chromosomal structure, oxygenases, 
collagen structure and metabolism, peptide hormones, hemoglobin. 
Prerequisite, Biochem. 201. 

Biochem. 204, 205. Seminar (1,1) 

Reports on current literature or on research in progress. Prerequisite, 

Biochem. 201. 

Biochemistry 399. Research 

Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 

Additional offerings are contemplated for 1965-1966 and later 
years and will be announced as offered. 

► BIOPHYSICS 

Professor: mullins. 

Associate Professors: sjodin and stern. 

Assistant Professor: hybl. 

The Department of Biophysics offers graduate courses of study lead- 
ing to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The 
study programs are flexible and depend on the preparation and interests 
of the student. Detailed requirements are available from the Department 
of Biophysics. 

It is recommended that students studying for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in Biophysics select a minor in either physics, chemistry, or 
mathematics. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Biophys. 100, 101. Introduction to Biophysics. (3,3) 
Fall semester, odd years; Spring semester, even years. Three lectures 
a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, Math. 18, 19. An 
introduction to the study of living systems applying the methods of 
physics and chemistry. The cell as a physicochemical system and ex- 



Biophysics gy 

perimental methods for investigation, nerve impulse conduction and 
excitation, the interaction of radiation with living material; the struc- 
ture and properties of muscle tissue, connective tissue, and their 
proteins. (Staff) 

Biophys. 102. Biophysics of Radiation. (2) 
Fall semester, even years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
1, 3, Phys. 10, 11. An advanced study of the interaction of radiation 
with living matter and with molecules of biological interest. Dosimetry 
problems and some bio-medical applications will be considered. 

(Mullins, Sjodin, Robinson) 

Biophys. 103. Laboratory Techniques in Biophysics. (3) 
Fall semester, 1967-1968. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Train- 
ing in the use of radioactive isotopes, radioactive counting equipment, 
and bioelectric measuring instruments applied to the study of mem- 
branes; viscosity, optical rotation, protein titrations, spectroscopy, con- 
ductivity, as applied to fiber forming proteins. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

(Staff) 

Biophys. 104. Seminar in Biophysics. (/) 
Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Seminars on 
various biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate students, and 
guest speakers. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

Biophys. 200. Advanced and Theoretical Biophysics. (3) 
Fall semester, odd years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Biophys. 
100, 101, or consent of staff. An advanced and critical analysis of 
experimental findings in terms of biophysical theory. (Staff) 

Biophys. 201. Membrane Biophysics. (2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, Math. 
20, 21. Diffusion in and through membranes developed from first 
principles with special reference to problems of ion transport in bio- 
logical membranes. (Sjodin) 

Biophys. 202. Biophysical Chemistry. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry, Differential 
and Integral Calculus. The application of physicochemical theory to 
the methods used to study the properties of proteins, nucleic acids, and 
other macromolecules and their component parts, and the properties 
of the fibers and other biological fabrics derived from these macro- 
molecules. The properties of interest will include molecular weight, 
size, shape and charge, intramolecular configuration, and intermolecu- 
lar interaction. The methods of interest will include light scattering, 
ultracentrifuge, viscosity and other hydrodynamic methods, optical 
rotation and rotary dispersion. (Stern) 



QQ International Medicine 

Biophys. 203. X-ray Crystallography. (3) 
Three lectures a week. An introduction to molecular structure determ- 
ination by the techniques of X-ray diffraction. Emphasis upon prob- 
lems arising in structural studies of molecules of biological origin. 

(Hybl) 

Biophys. 205 Colloquium in Biophysics. (1) 
Prerequisites, Biophys. 104 or consent of the staff. Colloquia on vari- 
ous biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate students and euest 
speakers. (Staff) 

Biophys. 399. Research in Biophysics. (3-6) 

Required of students planning to take the Master of Science degree or 

the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Biophysics. (Staff) 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A limited number of departmental fellowships and research assistant- 
ships are available in the Department of Biophysics. Inquiries should be 
directed to the department; deadline for applications is March 1. 

► INTERNATIONAL MEDICINE 

Professors: mc crumb (head of department), middlebrook, and nur 

AHMAD. 

Associate Professors: barnett and klimt. 

Assistant Professors: gregg, kogon, and underwood. 

International Centers for Medical Research and Training were created 
under the aegis of the National Institutes of Health in accordance with 
objectives of the International Health Research Act of 1960 (Public Law 
86-610, July 12, 1960). It was the purpose of this act to advance the 
status of international health research and research training. Congress 
further expressed the hope that "a program through United States univer- 
sities for the early development of research and research training centers 
with adequate field opportunities for international studies" would be estab- 
lished. This program under the direction of the Office of International Re- 
search of the National Institutes of Health provided for the establishment of 
a research and research training center at the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine in Baltimore in March of 1961. During the course of the past 
three years, the University of Maryland International Center for Medical 
Research and Training has succeeded in the establishment of domestic and 
overseas research-training programs in Baltimore and Lahore, West Paki- 
stan, with the following objectives: 

1 . The training in research in international health problems of Amer- 
ican physicians and allied professional workers as well as their 
Pakistani counterparts. 

2. The conduct of medical and allied research at the domestic and 
overseas sites to serve as the mechanism for such training. 

3. Creation, through scientific endeavors, of an atmosphere of mutual 
understanding and friendship between the host nation and the 
United States. 



Medicine QQ 

In July of 1963 international health activities of the University of Mary- 
land were consolidated under an Institute of International Medicine with 
departmental status within the School of Medicine. Under the present ad- 
ministrative arrangement, the International Center for Medical Research 
and Training forms the nucleus of the Institute into which other interna- 
tional and domestic programs are incorporated. 

The Institute of International Medicine is composed of Divisions of 
Epidemiology and Biostatics, Experimental Pathology, Nutrition, Medical 
Entomology and Ecology, Virology and Rickettsiology, and Clinical In- 
vestigation, and derives major support in addition from the Departments of 
Microbiology, Medicine, and Pediatrics. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Research Associate program of the International Center provides 
for postdoctoral training in the various disciplines represented within the 
Institute of International Medicine and affiliated Departments of Micro- 
biology, Medicine, and Pediatrics. In general, the program encompasses 
three years, two of which are spent on a field assignment at the Pakistan 
Medical Research Center in Lahore. 

Upon entry into the program each Research Associate works out in 
advance with his advisor a definitive plan of study and research. Assign- 
ment to Divisions and appointment to advisors depends upon the candi- 
date's background, interests, and needs. The global concept of medicine 
is emphasized and provision is made for more advanced training in special- 
ized aspects of international health. Following a basic orientation course, 
each Research Associate proceeds into one or another of specialized train- 
ing areas. During this time he becomes identified with one of the Institute's 
Divisions and begins preceptor type training through the mechanism of a 
research project which also prepares the candidate for field work in Paki- 
stan. Postdoctoral candidates with Ph.D., M.D., and D.V.M. degrees enter 
in one of several sepecialized programs soon after appointment to the pro- 
gram. These include infectious diseases-microbiology, nutrition, medical 
entomology, and epidemiology. In many instances overlapping interests will 
result in combined training and joint research projects. In some cases, addi- 
tional clinical training of physician candidates will be considered essential 
to the success of the over-all program. 

Applications should be submitted through the Head of the Department. 



► MEDICINE 

Professors: woodward (head of department), carey, ellis, krause, 

MC CRUMB, MERLIS, T. MORRISON, REVELL, ROBINSON, JR., AND 
V. SMITH. 

Associate Professors: andersch, bereston, connor, cotter, eastland, 

ELLINGER, GREISMAN, GUNDRY, HETHERINGTON, KARNS, LISANSKY, S. 

MORRISON, PARKER, H. RASKIN, R. C. V. ROBINSON, L. SCHERLIS, SCHU- 
BART, M. SNYDER, SPICER, SPURLING, TIGERTT, WISWELL, AND WORK- 
MAN. 



90 



Medicine 



Assistant Professors: andres, beacham, borges, burnett, Carroll, 

COHEN. EBELING, ENTWISLE, FORT, FREEMAN, HORNICK, JACOBSON, 
JUL LEACH, LEE, LEGUM, LERNER, D. LEVY, MCLEAN, MERRILL, 
MORGAN, MULLERj J. RASKIN, REITER, S. SCHERLIS, SERRA, SHAPIRO, 
SINGLETON, S. SMITH, SWISHER, TEITLEBAUM, WISSEMAN, ZIEVE, AND 
STAFF. 

Med. 102. Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 
Third year. This course consists of a clinical clerkship on the medical 
wards of the University Hospital for a period of 9 weeks. Students are 
responsible, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, 
laboratory examinations, and progress notes of assigned cases. They 
also attend ward rounds and conferences in general medicine with the 
Resident Staff, Attending Physicians, and Chief of Service. For an 
additional 3 weeks, students are assigned to the Baltimore City Hos- 
pitals for work in the General Medical Wards. They also attend ward 
rounds and teaching conferences in General Medicine, Tuberculosis, 
Neurology, and Radiology. 

Med. 103. The Principles of Medicine. 

Third year. A series of lectures in General Medicine, Neurology, and 

Clinical Medicine are given to the entire junior class on an elective 

basis. 

Med. 104. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 
Fourth year. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards of University 
Hospital, Mercy Hospital, and Maryland General Hospital, for 4 weeks. 
An additional 4 week period is spent in the Medical Out-Patient De- 
partment where instruction is given in General Medicine and the medi- 
cal specialties. During this tour the senior students make home visits on 
selected patients, participate in the workup of chronically ill patients 
at the Montebello Chronic Disease Hospital, and attend consultative 
rounds in cardiology, infectious diseases, gastroenterology, arthritis, 
radioisotopes, neurology, hematology, endocrinology, and pulmonary 
diseases on the wards of the University Hospital. 

Selected students who have completed the junior year may take 
Medicine 104 during the summer months. Application should be made 
to the Department Head prior to March 1 of the current year. Those 
students completing the course successfully will be assigned elective 
time during the academic year. This program is designed to foster re- 
search for promising students and to provide for more intensive train- 
ing in the fundamentals of clinical medicine. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Students who have completed their junior year are encouraged to seek 
additional training during the summer months preceding their senior 
studies. This training may be obtained in one of several ways. A limited 
number of students are appointed to Clinical Clerkships on the Medical 
Wards of the University Hospital. In these positions, they are responsible, 
under supervision, for the history, physical examination, laboratory studies 
and progress notes of assigned cases. 



Medicine Q J 

In addition, certain of the medical subspecialty divisions provide spe- 
cialized training for students as Summer Fellows during the summer 
months. The applicant is encouraged to apply directly to the Division 
Head. These fellowships enable the student to become acquainted with the 
various specialized diagnostic and research techniques, the clinical prob- 
lems and therapeutic regimens peculiar to each of the medical subspecial- 
ties. Summer Fellowships are available in the following Divisions: Cardi- 
ology, Clinical Pathology (2 appointments), Dermatology (2 appoint- 
ments). Endocrinology (2 appointments), Gastroenterology, Renal- 
Hyptertension (2 appointments), Infectious Diseases (2 appointments), 
Legal Medicine, Arthritis, Neurology and Radioisotopes (1 appointment), 
Pulmonary Diseases and Clinical Physiology (2 appointments). Interested 
applicants should contact the respective Division Head prior to January 1 
of the year in which the fellowship is desired. In many instances a fellow- 
ship award is made providing remuneration for two or three of the summer 
months. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

These are available in the various specialties of Medicine. For details 
see specific division. 

The Department of Medicine, for administrative purposes, is divided 
into eleven Divisions. Each of these Divisions participates in the major 
courses taught by the Department. In addition, a number of specialized 
courses and postgraduate fellowships are offered by the Divisions. 

Division of Arthritis 

Doctors: schubart (head of division), kochman, and staff. 

Med. 105. Division Rounds. 
Third year. Elective. 

Med. 105a. Outpatient Clinic. 

Fourth year. Elective. Weekly arthritis outpatient clinics and attend- 
ance at weekly arthritis seminar and rounds. 

Division of Cardiology 

Doctors: l. scherlis, (head of division), antlitz, dembo, gonzalez, 

LEE, S. SCHERLIS, SINGLETON, SWISHER, AND STAFF. 

Physiol. 101. Principles of Physiology. 

First year. Lectures and demonstrations in the Electrical Activity of 
the Heart in collaboration with the Department of Physiology. 
ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. 

Second year, second semester. The Division of Cardiology participates 
in presenting this course. 

Med. 106. Electrocardiology . (16) 

Third and fourth years. Elective. This is an introductory course con- 
sisting of illustrated group lectures and exercises. 

Med. 106a. Outpatient Clinic and Divisions Rounds 
Fourth year. Elective weekly clinic and attendance at rounds. 



92 



Medicine 



FELLOWSHIPS 

These are available to selected postgraduate applicants. The Fellow 
participates in the activities of the Division, including cardiac catheteriza- 
tion, by dilution and other physiologic studies. The fellowship begins 
July 1st of each year. A financal stipend is provided. Application is made 
through the Head of the Division and must be completed by October of 
the preceding year. 

Division of Clinical Pathology 

Doctors: spurling (acting head of division), andersch, jiji, Lan- 
caster, MILLER, AND STAFF. 

Med. 101. Clinical Pathology. (128) 

Second year. The course is designed to train the student in the per- 
formance and interpretation of the fundamental laboratory procedures 
used in clinical diagnosis. During the first semester the basic techniques 
of hematology as well as clinical aspects of blood diseases are taught. 
Blood group immunology in relation to transfusion is also covered. In 
the second semester the performance and interpretation of tests used in 
the diagnosis of renal, hepatic, gastric, pancreatic, and metabolic dis- 
eases are considered. A review, with clinical applications, of acid-base 
balance and electrolyte disturbances is included. Methods of examina- 
tion of cerebrospinal fluid, transudates and exudates are taught. Ele- 
ments of clinical parasitology complete the work in this semester. 

Each student provides his own microscope and blood counting 
equipment. A completely equipped locker is provided for each student. 

POST GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

Two full-time clinical and research fellowships in hematology are 
available to applicants who have had a minimum of one year internship. A 
financial stipend is provided. Application should be made to the Head of 
the Division. 

Division of Dermatology 

Professor: h. m. robinson, jr. (head of division), Doctors: bacharach, 

BARNETT, BERESTON, BUNDICK, ELLIS, HOLLANDER, RASKIN, R. C. V. 
ROBINSON, SHAPIRO, STRAHAN, AND STAFF. 

Med. 107. Introduction to Dermatology. 
Third year. Students are given assigned reading on the more common 
skin eruptions. Nine two hour clinical sessions are held for each quar- 
ter of the junior class. Individual instruction is given by one of the 
senior staff members emphasizing the pertinent aspects of differential 
diagnosis. 

Med. 108. Practical Exercises in Dermatology. 
Fourth year. Groups of 12 students spend 20 hours in the out-patient 
department where they are given individual instruction in the diagnosis 
and treatment of cutaneous lesions. Emphasis is laid on the relation- 
ship of various eruptions to systemic conditions. Instruction is given 
in mycologic technique. 



Medicine Q^ 

Med. 108a. 

Students who take dermatology for the senior elective receive special 

training in clinical dermatology and the basic sciences as applied to 

dermatology. 

GRADUATE TRAINING 

The Division of Dermatology is approved by the American Board of 
Dermatology for a three year period of training which is required by the 
Board. This consists of instruction in the basic sciences (mycology, bac- 
teriology, histopathology, chemistry, and physiology), and instruction in 
clinical dermatology. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of cutaneous 
lesions to systemic diseases. Residents and Fellows spend a part of the 
training period at the Rosewood School for Retarded Children, the Balti- 
more City Hospitals, and in the private offices of the members of the staff. 
Temporary membership in the dermatologic societies is provided under the 
sponsorship of the Division Head. 

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism 

Doctors: CONNOR (head of division), wiswell, workman, and staff. 

Endocrine Clinic — Conference and Rounds. 
Fourth year. Elective. Patients with a variety of endocrine-metabolic 
diseases are seen in the Out-Patient Department every Monday after- 
noon from 1 : 30 to 4:00 p.m. This is followed by a Conference in which 
clinical case material is presented for discussion with staff members 
and students actively participating. Every Friday afternoon weekly 
wards rounds are held. 

NUCLEAR MEDICINE 
(DR. WORKMAN, head) 

Pharmacology 201. 

Second year. In cooperation with the Department of Pharmacology, a 

portion of one laboratory session is utilized to demonstrate the accuracy 

of a radioisotope method of estimating thyroid function. 

Med. 110. 

Fourth year elective (Conference Nuclear Medicine). 

Postgraduate Fellowships are available to applicants who have com- 
pleted internship and at least one year of residency training. Opportunities 
for active participation in clinical and research activities are available. 
Independent research investigations are encouraged. A financial stipend is 
provided. Three full-time fellowship positions are available. 

Division of Gastroenterology 

Doctors: raskin (head of division), ebeling, s. morrison, v. smith, 

AND STAFF. 

ID. 2. Introduction of Clinical Medicine. 
Second year. The Division of Gastroenterology participates in the pres- 
entation of this course. 



QA Medicine 

Division of Hypertension and Renal Disease 
Professor: borges; Doctors: entwisle, young, and staff. 

Med. 1 10. Conferences on Hypertension. 

Fourth year. Elective. Conferences on pathologic-physiology of hyper- 
tensive and renal disorders, sites of action of antihypertensive drugs, 
methods for screening patients with hypertension and therapeutic 
methods in various disease processes. 

Med. 111. Outpatient Clinic and Division Rounds. 

Fourth year. Elective. Weekly clinics and attendance at rounds. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The Division sponsors two Fellows who receive training in pathologic- 
physiology of hypertensive states, techniques of screening patients and 
management of hypertensive renal problems. In addition, he participates 
actively in investigative problems. A financial stipend is provided. 

Division of Infectious Diseases 

Doctors: HORNICK (HEAD OF DIVISION), M. SNYDER, JACKSON, TOGO, AND 
STAFF. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The Division sponsors two Fellows who receive instruction in labora- 
tory techniques and clinical investigation. Fellows participate in all func- 
tions of the Division, including collaboration in investigative problems. 
A financial stipend is provided. Application is made through the Head of 
the Division. 

Division of Physical Diagnosis 

Doctor: cotter (head of division) and staff. 

ID. 2. Introduction of Clinical Medicine. 
Second year. The Division participates in presenting this course. 
ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. 

Second year, second semester. This course implements ID. 2. and 
provides the student with bedside instruction in physical diagnosis. 
Small tutorial groups are formed, each under the direction of an instruc- 
tor. In the first five weeks, experience in physical examination of 
normal individuals is given one afternoon weekly. During the subse- 
quent 12 weeks, students become acquainted with abnormal signs 
through examination of hospitalized patients. For the first five of these 
12 weeks the Division of Cardiology gives instruction in the phys- 
ical examination of the heart. Thereafter, sections are assigned in 
rotation to the Division of Neurology and the Department of Pediatrics 
for instruction in these specialties. 

Division of Pulmonary Diseases 

Doctors: spicer (head of division), blide, kerr, kowitz, marine, 

MORGAN, RAMIREZ-RIVERA, RUSCHE, SIMPSON, AND STAFF. 



Microbiology Q ^ 

Med. 113. Clinical Clerkship in Pulmonary Diseases. 

Third year. This 3 week period of training is given on the chest ward 
service and in the chest clinic. Students are assigned hospital patients 
whom they work up, follow, and present at rounds and at conference. 
Clinic and bedside teaching emphasizes development of the technique 
of the medical examination which is correlated with x-ray study. The 
seminars and conferences emphasize an understanding of the basic 
processes involved in respiratory health and disease. 
Fourth year. Elective. The chest clinic provides an opportunity for 
clinical and physiolgic study of patients with chronic bronchopulmon- 
ary disease, especially chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Emphasis 
during this elective period is placed on development of understanding 
of principles and techniques of testing of cardio-pulmonary function 
testing. 

STUDENT FELLOWSHIP 

The service offers four such positions for the support and supervision 
of students throughout their medical school career. These fellowships will 
provide special graded instruction and experience in research methodology, 
epidemiology, physical diagnosis, clinical chest disease, and pulmonary 
physiology. The individual student, during his medical school career, will 
gradually be introduced to clinical medical research so that he may plan 
and complete a research project during this period. 



► MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: wisseman (head of department). 

Associate Professor: eylar and smith. 

Assistant Professors: levin, mc crumb, myers, rosenzweig, snyder, 

AND STAFF. 

Microbiol. 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. 

(ISO) 
Second year, first semester. This course is intended to introduce the 
student to basic concepts of microbial agents and immunologic mecha- 
nisms necessary to understand infectious diseases, public health, and 
diseases of immunologic origin. Properties of microorganisms are con- 
sidered in relation to pathogenesis of infections, mechanisms of tissue 
damage and host defense mechanisms. Bacterial, fungal, viral, and 
rickettsial agents are studied in both lecture and laboratory. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy and encourages especially those who wish to enroll in the com- 
bined M.D.-Ph.D. program. While the degree of Master of Science may 
be offered in special instances, priority for research facilities will be 
given aspirants to the Ph.D. degree. These courses are available only 
by prior arrangement with the Staff. 



QA Microbiology 

Microbiol. 201 . Medical Microbiology and Immunology. 

.(8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and 
group conferences per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course, 
intended for the serious advanced student of medical microbiology, is 
built upon the framework of Microbiol. 101 supplemented with ad- 
vanced readings and laboratory work. 

Microbiol. 203. Microbial Physiology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week supplemented 

with demonstrations. By consent of instructor. 

Microbiol. 205. Cytology and Genetics of Micro- 
organisms. (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory per 
week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Registration by consent of instructor. 

Microbiol. 206, 207. Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate students, 
staff, and guests participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of 
subjects of special interest or pertinent to graduate training program. 

Microbiol. 208. Medical Mycology. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory per 

week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Registration by consent of instructor. 

Microbiol. 209. Special Topics. 

(Permission and credit arranged individually.) This course provides 
the opportunity for the graduate student to pursue under supervision 
subjects of special interest not offered in other formal courses. 

Microbiol. 210. Advanced Virology and Rickettsiology 

Lecture. (3) 
This course considers the general properties of viruses and rickettsiae, 
methods for studying them, and finally concentrates on agents of med- 
ical importance. Special emphasis is placed on the host-parasite 
relationship, characterization of the various viral and rickettsial agents 
and on biological and ecological factors. Registration is by permission 
of instructor only. The course will be given on the average on alter- 
nate years in the Spring semester. There are two weekly sessions of 90 
minutes each. Prerequisite: Microbiol. 201 or equivalent. 

Microbiol. 211. Virology and Rickettsiology Laboratory. 

(2) 
This course is the laboratory counterpart of Microbiol. 210. It is 
designed to familiarize the student with the major techniques for the 
study of virus and rickettsial agents, and to give him first hand experi- 
ence with a variety of the more common agents. Registration is by 
permission of instructor only. Because of the limited facilities and the 
nature of the work, it may be necessary to restrict registration in this 
course according to the following priority: students majoring in medical 

microbiology, then students minoring in microbiology and, finally, 
others. The laboratory consists of two formal sessions per week; how- 



Neurology i\H 

ever, the nature of the work frequently requires additional participation 
throughout the week. 

Microbiol. 399. Research (for thesis problem). 
Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 

► NEUROLOGY 

Professors: nelson (head of department) and merlis. 

Associate Professor: teitelbaum. 

Assistant Professor: kramer. 

Instructors: heck, hulfish, mosser, and oleynick. 

Neuro. 101. Introduction to Clinical Neurology (16) 
(Second year.) Lecture-demonstrations in neurology are presented, 
emphasizing correlation of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of 
the nervous system with clinical neurology. 

ID. 3. Neurologic Aspects of Physical Diagnosis. (8) 
(Second year.) The Department participates in the physical diagnosis 
course with instruction in the performance of the normal neurological 
examination as well as examination of selected patients with neuro- 
logical disorders. 

Neuro. 102. Clinical Clerkship in Neurology. 
Third year. Available for a portion of the third year class. This 
course consists of a clerkship on the neurology ward of the Univer- 
sity Hospital for approximately four weeks. Under house staff and 
attending staff supervision, the students are responsible for the total 
care of the patient with neurological disease. They may assist in the 
performance of some procedures and attend rounds and conferences 
in neurology. 

Neuro. 103. Practical Clinical Neurology. (10) 
Third year. A series of lecture-demonstrations given to the entire 
third year class with emphasis on diagnosis and treatment of the com- 
mon neurological diseases. 

Neuro. 104. 

Fourth year. Elective time of 4 weeks may be spent in the Depart- 
ment of Neurology, either on the ward or in one of the research 
laboratories. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Students who have completed their second or third years and have an 
interest in the neurological sciences may apply for additional training in 
clinical neurology or in one of the research laboratories of the Depart- 
ment of Neurology. Qualified students may receive remuneration for 
their summer work. 

POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 

There is a fully approved three year program for specialty training in 
Neurology at the University Hospital. This provides for clinical training 
as well as a rotation through the associated basic science disciplines. 
Fellowships with a stipend are provided and begin July 1 each year. For 
further information, contact the Head of the Department. 



QQ Obstetrics and Gynecology; Ophthalmology 

► OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY 

Professors: haskins (head of department) and kaltreider. 

Clinical Professors: reese and siegel. 

Associate Clinical Professors: cornbrooks and mc nally. 

Assistant Professors: middleton, moszkowski, munford, and villa 

SANTA. 

Assistant Clinical Professors: brady, da vis, diggs, dixon, morris, Mor- 
rison, seegar, and staff. 

Ob-Gyn. 101. Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
Third year. Students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology for a 
period of six weeks. As clinical clerks, they participate in the original 
diagnostic studies, pelvic surgical procedures, and postoperative care of 
hospitalized patients. 

Daily rounds, seminars, and departmental conferences with the 
attending staff and house officers aid the student in the interpretation 
and correlation with his observations, diagnoses, and the several thera- 
peutic regimens 

Specific instruction is provided in pathology, basic science, and 
endocrinology as related to obstetrics and gynecology. Obstetrical 
manikin exercises, prenatal examination, and gynecologic outpatient 
care are accomplished in the Outpatient Department. 

Ob-Gyn. 102. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics 

and Gynecology. 
Fourth year. Students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology at 
Baltimore City Hospital for a period of four weeks. The student 
rotates through the accident room, delivery floor and maternity divi- 
sion. He participates in daily rounds, deliveries, postpartum care, and 
seminars. Specific instruction in cancer, obstetrical complications, 
and pelvimetry is provided. 



► OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Professors: Richards (head of department), hart, and peckham. 

Associate Professor: fox. 

Assistant Professors: bernstein, boaz, cavonius, meisels, schocket, 

AND WILKINS. 

Instructors: creamer, feinberg, and Goldberg. 

Ophthal. 101. Introduction to Ophthalmology. 
Third year. A lecture course for the entire class covers the funda- 
mentals of Ophthalmology. Weekly section work, with emphasis on 
the use of the ophthalmoscope, includes discussion periods, demonstra- 
tions, and clinics. 

Ophthal. 102. Clinical Ophthalmology. 

Fourth year. Ward rounds, demonstrations, discussion periods, and 

clinics in diseases of the eye. 



Pathology QQ 

► PATHOLOGY 

Professors: firminger (head of department), fisher, hopps, stowell, 

AND WAGNER. 

Associate Professors: freimuth, lindenberg, merkel, petty, ras- 

MUSSEN, REIMANN, SCHULTZ, TOLL, WEINBERG, WOOD, AND WRIGHT. 

Assistant Professors: adams, breitnecker, burkart, guerin, katase, 

KIEFER, KIME, LEVIN, ROSENHOLTZ, AND STAFF. 

Path. 101. General, Systemic, and Experimental 

Pathology. (364) 
Second year. This course starts with the study of the basic principles 
of pathology and progresses with the study of diseases of the various 
organ systems. Teaching is chiefly by the case method using fresh and 
fixed autopsy cases but also utilizes gross museum specimens and a 
set of prepared selected histological slides. Students assist in the per- 
formance of autopsies in small groups, prepare final protocols, and 
present the findings and interpretation of the cases to others in the 
class. 

Included in the course is an introduction to experimental path- 
ology by two experiments illustrative of basic pathologic principles. 

Path. 102. Experimental Pathology. (Hours vary with 
project chosen.) 

Second year. A limited number of students have the opportunity to 
participate in experimental work. Some carry out a series of 6 ex- 
periments selected to illustrate the dynamics of disease processes. 
Others choose some area of the Department such as tissue culture, 
electron microscopy, or cytopathology for seminars and the pursuit 
of an original project under the supervision of a member of the Staff. 

Path. 103. Correlative Medical Pathology. (9) 
Third year. This course is given in collaboration with the Department 
of Medicine and consists of a series of conferences with small groups 
of students, an internist and a pathologist. An illustrative clinical case 
is used as the base for discussion of a few selected diseases with par- 
ticular emphasis on correlating the anatomical and functional changes 
with the clinical disease. 

Path. 104. Surgical Pathology. (16) 

Fourth year. This course consists of a series of rather informal lec- 
tures and discussions of the pathology of various surgical conditions 
with small groups of students using colored lantern slides, gross muse- 
um specimens, a set of prepared microscopic slides and current gross 
surgical specimens. 

Path. 105. Clinical Pathological Conferences. (36) 

Third and fourth years. These exercises are held in collaboration 
with various clinical departments. Histories from carefully chosen 
cases are circulated prior to the conference. Diagnoses are submitted 
and the differential diagnoses are discussed by selected members of 
the clinical faculty. The pathological findings are then presented and 
correlated with the clinical disease. 



100 Pathol °gy 

Path. 106. Elective Pathology. (115) 

Fourth year. Students may spend a month continuously in pathology 
as an assistant to a resident participating in autopsies, examination 
of surgical specimens, and contributing to discussions in the various 
conferences of the Department. 

Path. 107. (56) 

Second year (second semester). A small group of students attend a 
series of round table discussions on the diagnosis of medical diseases 
by biopsy. The course includes microscopic study of the histopatho- 
logic findings, their interpretation and significance with special em- 
phasis on diseases of the liver and kidney. 

FELLOWSHIPS (AFTER SOPHOMORE YEAR) 

Students may be selected for summer fellowships in pathology or 
in certain instances drop out of the regular curriculum for a year 
and devote their entire time to pathology. Their activities are either 
ot two types, one consists of serving as externs in pathology, the 
other is directed more toward research with students participating in 

research projects under the supervision of a Staff member. 

Division of Neuropathology 

Doctors: wagner (head of division) and staff. 

A series of lectures, demonstrations, and case studies relating to the 
problems of neurologic disease is integrated into the second year course in 
pathology. Additional courses offered include: 

Path. 106. Correlative Neuropathology. (4) 

Third year. This course is given in collaboration with the Division of 
Neurology. Presentation of the history of an illustrative case is done 
by the student. This is followed by group discussion and by the presen- 
tation of neurologic and pathologic findings by the faculty. 

Path. 107. Advanced Neuropathology. 
Elective course open to third and fourth year students and Doctors of 
Medicine. One hour per week, second semester. Includes review of 
practical anatomy, discussion of pathologic principles as applied to the 
central nervous system, staining techniques and a thorough study of a 
selected group of illustrative cases with emphasis on clinical correla- 
tion and microscope appearance. Seminar discussions and papers 
presented by students are included. Offered annually for ten acceptable 
students. 

Division of Forensic Pathology 

Doctors: fisher (head of division), freimuth, guerin, lindenberg, 

PETTY, AND STAFF. 
FOR GRADUATES 

In addition to teaching basic forensic pathology in the second year 
course this division offers a number of other courses including a graduate 



Pediatrics 1()1 

program in toxicology leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy in Toxicology. 

Leg. Med. 201. Legal Medicine. (/) 

Third year or graduate students. This course consists of one hour of 
lecture for each of 12 weeks and 4 hours of assigned reading. 

Leg. Med. 202. Toxicology. (10) 

Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per week for one year. 

Leg. Med. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to 

Toxicology. (2) 
Two hours per week for one year. 

Leg. Med. 204. Research in Toxicology Leading to Pre- 
paration of a Thesis for the M.S. (6) 

Minimum credits, six. 

Leg. Med. 205. Research in Toxicology Leading to Pre- 
paration of a Thesis for the Ph.D. (30) 

► PEDIATRICS 

Professors: BRADLEY (head of department), bessman, finkelstein, 

AND HEPNER. 

Associate Professors: Baldwin, clemmens, glaser, glick, good, gorten, 

SCHERLIS, F. B. SMITH, WALKER, AND WELLS. 

Assistant Professors: fineman, Grossman, hammel, heldrich, jantz, 

JENSEN, LENTZ, LONDON, LYON,. MOSSER, SHIFFMAN, AND WEAVER. 

Associates: field, howell, mansdorfer, mc crumb, spragins, and 

STAFF. 

Ped. 101. Inpatient Clerkship. 

Third year. Students are assigned as clinical clerks for a period of six 
weeks to the pediatric wards of the University and Mercy Hospitals. 
They are responsible for patient care and work with house staff and 
instructors in planning the workup and treatment of assigned patients. 
Ward rounds are attended three times weekly. The students are as- 
signed tutors who meet with their students two times weekly. 

Daily conferences are held covering x-ray diagnosis, cardiology, 
journal review, chart conferences, neonatal mortality, case discussions 
and metabolic diseases. Discussions cover concepts of the premature 
and neonate, therapeutic management of pediatric patients, nutritional 
aspects and disturbances of the genitourinary tract. 

Ped. 102. Outpatient Department Clerkship. 
Fourth year. Students assigned to pediatrics as clinical clerks for a 
period of four weeks work in the Pediatric Outpatient Department of 
the University Hospital. All patients seen by the students are reviewed 
by an instructor of the pediatric staff. Daily conferences covering a 
wide range of pertinent pediatric topics are held from 9:30 to 10:30 



102 Pharmacology 

a.m. Students are assigned to the Development, Seizure, Pediatric 
Hematology, Cardiology and Child Guidance Clinics. Senior students 
are responsible for physical examinations of all neonates. Field trips 
to various community agencies are offered to selected students. Ward 
rounds for senior students are held twice weekly in the University Hos- 
pital. Senior students attend the departmental noon conferences. 

Ped. 103. Laboratory Research Problems in Pediatrics. 

Second year. Elective. (Two students per year.) Students will be re- 
quired to set up simple laboratory procedures to be used by them in 
the study of a clinical problem. Problems will be selected of such 
limited scope that a fairly complete project can be done by two students 
cooperating in their elective time over a period of one year. Emphasis 
will be made on the accuracy and reliability of s f andard techniques, as 
applied to the detailed analysis of a clinical problem. Interested stu- 
dents should apply to Dr. Bessman. 

► PHARMACOLOGY 

Professors: burgison and truitt. 

Associate Professors: bryant and o'neill. 

Assistant Professors: cascorbi, musser, rozman, and rudo. 

Pharmacol. 101. General Pharmacology. (233) 
Second year. This course is designed to include those phases of 
pharmacology necessary for an intelligent use of drugs in the treatment 
of disease. The didactic instruction includes pharmacy, prescription 
writing, toxicology, posology, pharmacodynamics, and experimental 
therapeutics. The laboratory exercises parallel the course of lectures. 
In addition, optional conference periods and lectures are available 
for students desiring further instruction or advice. 

FOR GRADUATES 

All students majoring in the Department of Pharmacology with a 
view to obtaining the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy 
should secure special training in anatomy, mammalian physiology, or- 
ganic chemistry, and physical chemistry. 

Pharmacol. 201. f. s. General Pharmacology. (9) 
Same as 101, for students majoring in pharmacology. Additional in- 
struction and collateral reading are required. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

Pharmacol. 205. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the amount of work 

accomplished. 

Pharmacol. 206. Pharmacologic Methods. 

Maximum credits, 4. Credit in accordance with the work accomplished. 

Pharmacol. 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of 

Pharmacodynamics. {2,2) 
Pharmacol. 209. Biochemical Pharmacology. (2) 
Pharmacol. 210. History of Pharmacology. (2) 



Physiology 103 

► PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: blake (head of department). 

Associate Professors: adelman, barraclough, coleman, merlis, pinter, 

AND SOLOMON. 

Research Associate Professor: glaser. 

Assistant Professors: fayer, greisman, and karpeles. 

Instructor: barry. 

Physiol. 101. Principles of Physiology. (225) 
First year, second semester. The lectures cover the major fields of 
physiology, including the following areas: central and peripheral 
nervous systems, neuromuscular apparatus, heart and circulation, 
respiration, kidney and body fluids, gastrointestinal tract, endocrines, 
and reproduction. The laboratory includes experiments with frog and 
turtle heart and nerve-muscle preparations, mammalian operative 
work and observations on the human subject. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate program in physiology is designed primarily for stu- 
dents oriented toward an academic career in the field of mammalian 
physiology, basic or applied. Some background in mathematics, physics 
and/or physical chemistry is considered essential and ordinarily only 
those wishing to complete the requirements for the Ph.D. degree will be 
considered. Before admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree the Department gives a qualifying examination, both oral and 
written, which must be satisfactorily passed. 

A student majoring in Physiology will ordinarily be expected to take 
General Physiology (209) and Principles of Physiology (201) before the 
advanced seminar courses and will extend his major program by taking 
courses in other departments of the University. 

Physiol. 201. Principles of Physiology. (9) 
Same as Physiol. 101, for graduate students taking physiology. Addi- 
tional reading will be required. Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Staff) 

Physiol. 202. Cardiovascular Physiology. (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Reading assignments, seminars, con- 
ferences on current research in the cardiovascular field. (Karpeles) 

Physiol. 203. Pulmonary Physiology. (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Reading assignments, lectures, semi- 
nars on current research in pulmonary physiology. (Staff) 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. 
Time and credit by arrangement. The various technical procedures cur- 
rently operating in the Department will be demonstrated and oppor- 
tunity will be given for acquiring experience in them. (Staff) 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2) 
Two hours a week, lectures, seminars and conferences, for 15 weeks. 
Consideration will be given to the current status of knowledge of renal 
function and body fluids in vertebrates, with particular reference to 
mammals. 



1 Q/t Preventive Medicine 

Physiol. 206. Seminar. 

Credit according to work done. Weekly meetings are held to discuss 

recent literature and results of departmental research. (Staff) 

Physiol. 207. Physiology of the Central Nervous 

System. (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and reading 
assignments on current knowledge of central nervous system function. 

(Merlis) 

Physiol. 208. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous 

System. (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and reading 
assignments on current knowledge of autonomic nervous system func- 
tion. (Blake) 

Physiol. 209. General Physiology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, reading assignments, and 
seminars on selected topics in general, cellular and neurophysiology. 
Some laboratory work is included. ( Adelman) 

Physiol. 399. Research. 

By arrangement with Head of the Department. 

► PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION 

Professors: entwisle (head of department). 

Associate Professors: barrett, dowling, Henderson, mahoney. p. 

RICHARDSON, AND TAYBACK. 

Assistant Professors: Baxter, Fleischer, kogon, reinke, a. richardson, 

AND STAFF. 

Prev. Med. 101. Biostatistics. (42) 

First year, second semester. Each weekly two and a half hour session 
is divided into a lecture period followed by small group sessions used 
for review, discussion or practical exercises. This series of lectures 
and small group sessions illustrates the basic methods of statistical 
analysis and demonstrates their use in several areas of clinical practice 
and investigation. The course will cover the following statistical sub- 
jects: Concepts of measurement in medicine, analytical methods for 
quantitative and qualitative data, life table method and application 
to medicine, age adjustment and bio-assay. 

Prev. Med. 102. Epidemiology and Community Medicine. 

(34) 
Second year, second semester. The basic methods and application of 
epidemiology are reviewed and illustrated by consideration of certain 
groups of chronic diseases. Patterns of illness and medical care are 
discussed, and the role of a variety of health agencies is reviewed. 



Psychiatry JQ5 

Prev. Med. 103. Applied Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation I. (48) 
During third year the student is assigned a patient with a chronic dis- 
ease and follows this patient and the patient's family, the student serv- 
ing as a health advisor. During this year of practical experience, the 
student studies in depth the medical care and management of his pa- 
tient, including the use of community resources, and the community 
distribution and the epidemiology of the specific chronic diseases which 
his patient manifests. This family-based program gives the student 
an opportunity to understand comprehensive medical care. 

In addition, the student participates in small group sessions in 
the areas of rehabilitation, including comprehensive evaluation serv- 
ices, medical care and chronic disease. Part of the student's assign- 
ment is at Montebello State Hospital. 

Prev. Med. 104. Applied Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation II. (18) 
Fourth year. Each student participates in four seminars devoted to 
broad consideration of the application of preventive medicine in gen- 
eral and specialty practice. In addition, the student participates in four 
clinical conferences on rehabilitation problems of patients in University 
Hospital. 

Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Doctors: p. richardson (head of division), dowling, Fleischer, gess- 

NER, LENTZ, MAHONEY, A. RICHARDSON, AND STAFF. 

The Division participates in Preventive Medicine 103 where the stu- 
dents receive lecture demonstrations and participate in small group dis- 
cussions in the application of physical medicine procedures and rehabilita- 
tion techniques in the general practice of medicine. Part of this assignment 
is at Montebello State Hospital. The Division also participates in Pre- 
ventive Medicine 104 with four clinical conferences on rehabilitation prob- 
lems of patients in the University Hospital. 



► PSYCHIATRY 

Professors: brody (head of department), bartemeier, farinholt, 

GRENELL, KUBIE, MONROE, AND REID. 

Associate Professors: anderson, m. guttmacher, hartz, klee, b. pope, 

RAFFERTY, H. ROBINSON, WEINTRAUB, WILL, AND I. YOUNG. 

Assistant Professors: huffer, lisansky, raher, viega, and weston. 
Instructors: eichler, fiedler, holden, o'connor, tanega, and staff. 

Psy. 101a. Life Situations, Emotions and Illness. 

(Saturday mornings, 1st semester.) 
This course develops a frame of reference for viewing illness of all 
kinds, emotional and physical, from the study of adults with a wide 



\0(y Psychiatry 

variety of medical problems. Much of the material is developed during 
the course of class room interviews with patients from the medical and 
surgical wards. Important issues include: reactions to stress and situ- 
ational and social factors in disease. Emphasis is placed upon observ- 
ing, understanding and evaluating the personal and social factors in the 
disease process, in treatment, and in prevention. 

Psy. 101b. Introduction to Personality Development. 
(Saturday mornings, 2nd semester.) 

With the material of the first semester as background, this course offers 
a developmental approach to the task of understanding how an individ- 
ual becomes the person he is. A survey of representative theoretical 
approaches is followed by a chronological discussion of childhood 
which integrates genetics, embryology, psychoanalysis, learning theory 
and the social sciences. Etiological considerations and relationships to 
medical problems and patient management are emphasized. 

Psy. 101c. Behavioral Science and Psychiatry. (Tuesday 

and Thursday mornings, 2nd semester.) (32) 
This course is concurrent with 101b, and it is expected that the two 
series of discussions will have a mutually stimulating value. Both 101b 
and 101c attempt a more detailed analysis of issues arising in the gen- 
eral clinical framework developed in 101a. This course will introduce 
basic concepts derived from the behavioral sciences (sociology, anthro- 
pology, and psychology) and from psychoanalysis and related areas as 
they apply to the problems encountered by the clinician. It is expected 
that courses 101a, b, and c will provide a basis for the material of 
course 102. 

Psy. 102. Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry. 

Psy chop athology and Psychotherapy. (60) 
Class room interviews with psychiatric patients, lectures and discussion 
will furnish a basis for the clerkships of the third and fourth years. 

Psy. 103. Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship. (3 weeks) 
Third year. Students work as clinical clerks in The Psychiatric Insti- 
tute. Each student is assigned to an Assistant Resident who acts as a 
preceptor. As patients are admitted, they are assigned to a student who 
assumes responsibility for the examination and the history. In the out- 
patient department, the students see all patients applying for treatment 
either on an emergency basis or by appointment. During- the evenings 
two students take "call" with an Assistant Resident. 

Psy. 104. Advanced Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship (4 

weeks) 
Fourth year. A clinical clerkship is offered in the wards of the Univer- 
sity Hospital for one month. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis, methods 
of interviewing, methods of developing and managing a therapeutic 
doctor-patient relationship, and carrying out psychotherapy. Two 
afternoons each week are spent treating patients under supervision in 
the Comprehensive Clinic. Each student also works with one child 



Radiology \0f 

patient and his parents in the Mental Hygiene Clinic of the Western 
Health District. An eight hour seminar on psychosomatic problems 
is given. 

► RADIOLOGY 

Professors: dennis (head of department), bloedorn, and Davidson. 
Associate Professors: cuccia, hearn, lyon, robinson, and wolfel. 
Assistant Professors: seydel and wizenberg. 
Instructors: hyman, navarro, restivo, thomas, and wallop. 

Rad. 101. Radiologic Anatomy. (12) 

First year, first semester. A correlated course is given in conjunction 
with the Department of Anatomy. This course consists of nine lecture- 
demonstrations devoted to the skull, chest, gastrointestinal tract, 
genitourinary tract, the spine, and joints. Not only is the normal 
anatomy shown, but the radiologic aspects of a few pathologic processes 
are also shown for emphasis and correlation. 

Rad. 103. Radiation Therapy Orientation. (5) 
Third year. This series of five lectures is given to the whole third year 
class to present the basis of radiation therapy. In the first lecture, the 
basic principles of radiotherapy and the present and future role of 
radiotherapy of malignant tumors is presented. The second lecture is 
devoted to the principles of radiobiology, radiophysics and radiation 
protection. The last three lectures deal with groups of tumors that are 
curable with ionizing radiation with a discussion of the principle indica- 
tions, management and results of radiotherapy in each of these groups. 

Rad. 104. Radiologic Orientation I. {33) 
Third year. A series of lecture-demonstrations are given to small 
groups of students at the Baltimore City Hospital, Mercy Hospital, and 
the University Hospital. An attempt is made to cover the roentgen 
studies of all systems of the body with demonstrations of the more com- 
mon lesions encountered in each system. At Baltimore City Hospital, 
twelve lecture-demonstrations are given on the chest, the genitourinary 
tract and metabolic bone diseases, while at Mercy Hospital, three hours 
are devoted to the arthritides and bone tumors. At the University Hos- 
pital, eighteen additional lecture-demonstrations are devoted to the 
lungs, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and skull. 

Rad. 105. Radiologic Orientation II. (60) 
Fourth year. Students in groups of five are assigned full time for a 
period of two weeks to the Diagnostic Division of the Department of 
Radiology. On alternate mornings, a student observes chest and gastro- 
intestinal fluoroscopy, interviews outpatients and correlates the clinical 
and roentgen findings on these patients and attends film reading sessions 
with the staff radiologists. The students are taught the basic principles 
of fluoroscopy and are assigned a few patients with pulmonary and 
cardiac lesions to fluoroscope. Recommended reading assignments are 
made and the students spend the afternoons studying a select group of 



108 Sur sery 

teaching cases which are correlated with these reading assignments. 
Daily diagnostic conferences are held with the students, and at this 
time the interesting cases of the day are presented. They also attend 
joint conferences held with the department of Pediatrics, and the Divi- 
sion of General and Thoracic Surgery. 

► SURGERY 

Professors: buxton (head of department), austin, blanchard, cow- 
ley, HULL, KITLOWSKI, O'ROURK, PESSAGNO, YEAGER, AND YOUNG. 

Associate Professors: flotte, garlick, linberg, mansberger, Scarbor- 
ough, AND THOMPSON. 
Assistant Professors: adams, attar, bongardt, bowie, cox, govatos, 

HAINES, HUBBARD, MAYS, MOSBERG, SCHWARTZ, S1WINSKI, WILDER, 
AND STAFF. 

Surg. 101. Principles of Surgery. (25) 

Third year. These lectures are discussions of fundamental surgical 
problems and a systematic description of general surgical disease. 
The discussions are designed as introductions to and preparation for 
detailed reading in standard textbooks, current periodicals, and mono- 
graphs in surgery. 

Surg. 101a. Surgical Specialty Lectures. (42) 
Third year. This is a continuation of Surg. 101, wherein the surgical 
discussions center around the problems of Otorhinolaryngology, Tho- 
racic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic Surgery, and Urologic Sur- 
gery. 

Surg. 103. Outpatient Clerkship in Surgery. (286) 
Third year. One-fourth of the third year class is assigned to the De- 
partment of Surgery each quarter of the school year. Students are 
assigned to the Outpatient Department for the examination and super- 
vised care of patients in the General Surgical, Orthopedic, Urologic, 
and ENT Clinics. One-third of this quarter is spent at Mercy Hospital. 
Students are assigned in rotation as clinical clerks at night in the Emer- 
gency Room. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Fellowships are available each summer for a period of ten weeks in the 
Surgical Research Laboratory. Both sophomore and junior students are 
eligible. Investigative problems related to these services will be undertaken 
under the guidance of members of the Surgical Staff. 

Division of General Surgery 

Doctors: adams, bongardt, bowie, buxton, cox, flotte, govatos, 

HUBBARD, HULL, MANSBERGER, OLLODART, PESSAGNO, SCARBOROUGH, 
SIWINSKI, STEWART, YEAGER, AND STAFF. 

Surg. 103a. 

This is the student's introduction to an office-type surgical practice in 

that he undertakes the supervised care of patients in the Surgical Dis- 



Surgery \QQ 

pensary. General discussions related to problems presented by these 
patients are given by the Surgical Staff. The introduction to specific 
surgical techniques in examination and treatment of patients is under- 
taken. This course is given at both University and Mercy Hospitals. 
Audio-visual instruction is given. Students are assigned to the Emer- 
gency Room during this period. 

Surg. 104a. 

Senior students are assigned to patients on the surgical wards in the 
University Hospital. They are responsible for the physical examina- 
tion, history, and certain laboratory tests as required by the patient's 
disease. They participate in the active care and treatment of patients. 

Division of Neurosurgery 

Doctors: ARNOLD, THOMPSON, AND STAFF. 

Surg. 104b. 

Senior students assigned to this division act in the capacity of student 
interns. The students are closely integrated with the House Staff and 
are assigned sufficient patients so that comprehensive experience in the 
diagnosis and treatment of neurosurgical problems is obtained. Instruc- 
tion is through ward rounds and informal discussions. Wednesday 
mornings are devoted to clinical, x-ray, and neuropathological confer- 
ences. 

Division of Orthopedic Surgery 

Doctors: AUSTIN, (head of department), tansey, wilder, and staff. 

Surg. 103c. 

Junior students are assigned to this division in the Outpatient Depart- 
ment at University and Mercy Hospitals. Patients are seen for diag- 
nosis and postoperative care. Instruction is given in the application of 
plaster casts and in the ambulatory management of orthopedic prob- 
lems. Occasion is given to instruction in the Physical Therapy of pa- 
tients with orthopedic disease. 

Surg. 104c. 

Senior students are assigned patients both on the surgical wards and in 
the Emergency Room. They participate in the care of these patients, 
and are given instruction in the application of traction and plaster casts. 
Frequent ward rounds are held at the Kernan Hospital for Crippled 
Children, where an Amputee Training Program is active. 



Division of Otolaryngology 
Doctors: alderman, blancha 

AND STAFF. 

Mercy Hospital: drs. Schwartz, gerlach, Isaacs, and kayser. 



Doctors: alderman, blanchard, cross, engnoth, natale, o'rourk, 

AND STAFF. 



110 Sur 8 er y 

Surg. 103e. 

In a series of six periods of four hours, in the Outpatient Otolaryngol- 
ogy Clinic, junior students are individually instructed in the techniques 
of the examination of the ears, nose, and throat. One hour of basic 
audiological technique is presented to each group by an audiologist, 
one hour of introductory speech pathology is presented by a speech 
pathologist. 

Surg. 104e. 

An advanced period of elective study with emphasis on diagnosis and 
treatment is available to approximately 1 8 senior students each year as 
an alternate elective surgical specialty for one month's duration. In the 
Outpatient Department, diagnostic problems are presented at confer- 
ences with the staff department head twice each week and thoroughly 
reviewed in the light of current practice. Two sessions each week are 
available to the student to assist in the operating room and two sessions 
each week are available in the bronchoesophagology clinic. Each stu- 
dent is responsible for evening emergency calls on Ear, Nose, and 
Throat and examination of the patients admitted on the service. Daily 
ward rounds are carried out with the students. 



Division of Thoracic Surgery 

Doctors: attar, blair, garlick, linberg, Mclaughlin, miller, and 

STAFF. 

Surg. 104f. 

Senior students participate in the care of these patients in the operating 
rooms and on the wards of University, Mercy and Mt. Wilson Hospitals. 
In addition, they receive instruction in diagnostic bronchoscopy, esoph- 
agoscopy, cardiac catheterization, angiocardiography, and pulmonary 
function studies. 



Division of Urological Surgery 

Doctors: young, Campbell, galleher, mays, and staff. 

Surg. 103d. 

Instruction is given to junior students in this division in the diagnosis of 
urologic disease of both men and women. The general aspects of in- 
strumentation are discussed and the roentgenologic evidence of urologic 
disease is emphasized. 

Surg. 104d. 

Students are assigned patients in the University Hospital wards. Fur- 
ther instruction is given in diagnosis and instrumentation of these 
patients and in the x-ray diagnosis of urologic disease. 



Postgraduate Courses 



COMMITTEE ON POSTGRADUATE STUDIES 

ephraim t. lisansky, m.d., Chairman 
MRS. Elizabeth b. carroll, Executive Secretary 

RAYMOND L. CLEMMENS, M.D. ERLAND NELSON, M.D. 

THOMAS B. CONNOR, M.D. HOWARD F. RASKIN, M.D. 

VIRGINIA HUFFER, M.D. LEONARD SCHERLIS, M.D. 

ARLIE R. MANSBERGER, JR., M.D. WILLIAM S. SPICER, JR., M.D. 
EDMUND B. MIDDLETON, M.D. WILLIAM S. STONE, M.D., DEAN, 

EX-OFFICIO 

The Postgraduate Committee continues to provide the opportunity 
for practicing physicians to keep abreast of the newer developments in 
the science and practice of medicine. 

The following are the major group courses for 1964-1965: Gas- 
troenterology, Neuropathology, Clinical Anatomy, Advances in Medical 
Science, Practical Dermatology, Obstetrics, Diabetes, Anesthesia, Eye, 
Ear, Nose and Throat, Surgical Physiology, Hematology, Clinical Cardiol- 
ogy, Obstetrics, and Psychiatry. These courses were all given on the cam- 
pus. A course in General Medicine was given at Hughesville, Maryland. 

At this writing, the program for 1965-1966 has not been formulated 
definitely, but it is expected that in addition to courses in many of the 
subjects listed above, there will also be a presentation in Mental Retarda- 
tion and one in The Current Aspects of Laboratory Techniques. 

Guest Faculty 

Joe M. Blumberg, M.D. D. Frank Kaltreider, M.D. 

David Cowen, M.D. Harvey C. Knowles, Jr., M.D. 

Thaddeus S. Danowski, M.D. C. Ronald Koons, M.D. 

Kenneth M. Earle, M.D. Henricus Kuypers, M.D. 

John K. Frost, M.D. Richard Lindenberg, M.D. 

Ali Z. Hameli, M.D. G. Allen Moulton, M.D. 

James R. M. Innes, D.V.M. Charles Van Buskirk, M.D. 

University of Maryland Faculty 

Thurston R. Adams, M.D. James G. Arnold, M.D. 

Edward Adelson Raymond M. Atkins, M.D. 

George C. Alderman, M.D. Safu Attar, M.D. 

Ill 



|^2 Postgraduate Courses 



Margaret Ballard, M.D. 
Eugene S. Bereston, M.D. 
Samuel P. Bessman, M.D. 
Cyrus L. Blanchard, M.D. 
Francis J. Borges, M.D. 
Harry C. Bowie, M.D. 
Otto C. Brantigan, M.D. 
Harold H. Bryant, Ph.D. 
Raymond M. Burgison, Ph.D. 
Robert W. Buxton, M.D. 
C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D. 
Thomas B. Connor, M.D. 
R. Adams Cowley, M.D. 
Everard F. Cox, M.D. 
Donald Dembo, M.D. 
John M. Dennis, M.D. 
Everett S. Diggs, M.D. 
Ford Ebner, Fellow 
F. A. Ellis, M.D. 
Milton L. Engnoth, M.D. 
L. Whiting Farinholt, L.L.M. 
Harlan I. Firminger, M.D. 
Dino E. Flores, M.D. 
Thomas C. Flotte, M.D. 
Samuel L. Fox, M.D. 
C. Barton Galloway, M.D. 
Thomas A. Good, M.D. 
Sheldon E. Greisman, M.D. 
Milton S. Grossman, M.D. 
Louis E. Harman, M.D. 
Arthur L. Haskins, M.D. 
John B. Hearn, F.F.R. 
Thomas R. Hendrix 
Ray Hepner, M.D. 
Rouben Jiji, M.D. 
Arthur F. Jones 
Theodore E. Kardash, M.D. 
James King, Sr. M.D. 
Christian R. Klimt, M.D. 
Louis A. M. Krause, M.D. 
Julius Krevans, M.D. 
Eugene J. Linberg, M.D. 
Elmer G. Linhardt, M.D. 
Ephraim T. Lisansky, M.D. 
Richard L. London, M.D. 
James A. Lyon, Jr., M.D. 
Arlie R. Mansberger, Jr., M.D. 
Patricia Mclntyre 
Alfred Meisels, M.D. 
Albert I. Mendeloff, M.D. 
Jerome Merlis, M.D. 



Edmund B. Middleton, M.D. 
Keith C. Morgan, M.D. 
Erica Moszkowski, M.D. 
Richard S. Munford, M.D. 
Ralph D. Natale, M.D. 
Walle J. H. Nauta 
Erland Nelson, M.D. 
Robert M. Ollodart, M.D. 
Ross Z. Pierpont, M.D. 
Howard F. Raskin, M.D. 
Joan Raskin, M.D. 
Dee Rasmussen, M.D. 
Peter Rasmussen, M.D. 
Herbert Reifschneider, M.D. 
Richard D. Richards, M.D. 
Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D. 
R. C. Vail Robinson, M.D. 
Robert S. Rozman, Ph.D. 
Frieda Rudo, Ph.D. 
George Santos, M.D. 
Leonard Scherlis, M.D. 
Adalbert F. Schubart, M.D. 
Robert B. Schultz, M.D. 
Marvin M. Schuster, M.D. 
Arthur Serpick 
William B. Settle, M.D. 
Pedro A. Sevidal, Jr., M.D. 
Albert Shapiro, M.D. 
Charles E. Shaw, M.D. 
Isadore A. Siegel, M.D. 
Robert T. Singleton, M.D. 
Aubrey C. Smoot, M.D". 
Carroll L. Spurling, M.D. 
Patrick B. Storey, M.D. 
M. Wilson Toll, M.D.C.M. 
Edward B. Truitt, Ph.D. 
M. Eugene Tudino, M.D. 
George E. Urban, Jr., M.D. 
O. P. VanBijsterveld, M.D. 
Umberto Villa Santa, M.D. 
Gerald W. Wagger, M.D. 
John A. Wagner, M.D. 
Stuart H. Walker, M.D. 
W. Wallace Walker, M.D. 
Earl M. Wilder, M.D. 
Howard M. Wisotzkey, M.D. 
John G. Wiswell, M.D. 
Celeste L. Woodward, M.D. 
Joseph B. Workman, M.D. 
Stanley N. Yaffe, M.D. 
John D. Young, M.D. 



Matriculants 



FIRST YEAR 

Class of 1968 



Name 

Allison, Samuel Bertram, A.B 
Amoss, Willard Pitzer, A.B. 
Baum, Richard Alan, A.B. 
Beach, Roger Aldworth, B.S. 
Beamon, Charles Ralph, Jr., A.B. 
Bearman, Sheldon Barry, A.B. 
Berman, Ethel Ann, A.B. 
Blumberg, Morton Barry, A.B. 
Bowen, Bruce James, B.S. 
Britton, Robert Mark, B.S. 
Brull, Robert, B.S. 
Buddington, Richard Spencer, A.B. 
Caldwell, John Leo 
Callaghan, Joseph Francis, Jr., B.S. 
Caplan, Ellis Sanford, B.S. 
Cherry, Joel Mayer, B.S. 
Clopper, Todd Dalton, A.B. 
Coffeen, Thomas William, A.B. 
Cohen, Elliot Sanford, B.S. 
Colligan, Franklyn William, B.S. 
Crosse, St. George Idris B., B.S. 
Davidov, Howard Allen, A.B. 
Deaver, David LeRoy, A.B. 
Deegan, Michael John, B.S. 
Egloff, Allen Clark, A.B. 
Fausel, Robert Wilton, Jr. 
Feldman, Gerald Barry B.S. 
Franklin, Frank Anthony, Jr., B.S 
Friedman, Howard Ronald, A.B. 
Frizzera, John Gordon, B.S. 
Gambrill, Raymond, III, B.S. 
Gehlert, Sidney Richard, III, B.S. 
Gelin, John deCourtenay, A.B. 
Gelman, Stuart Irwin, B.S. 
Glick, Ronald Sheldon 
Goldstein, William Neal, A.B. 
Green, Gerald Ira, B.S. 
Groover, Jack Richard, B.S. 
Handwerger, Barry Sheldon 
Harris, Roger Clark, A.B. 



Undergraduate School Home State 

Swarthmore College, 1964 Delaware 

Western Maryland College, 1964 Maryland 

Brown University, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Virginia 

University of Pennsylvania, 1964 Maryland 

Wheaton College, 1964 New Jersey 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Trinity College, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Duke University, 1964 Maryland 

Mt. St. Mary's College Maryland 

Boston College, 1964 Massachusetts 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1963 Maryland 

Franklin & Marshall College, 1964 New Jersey 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 New York 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Maryland State College, 1964 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1963 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 Maryland 

St. Joseph's College, 1964 New Jersey 

Grinnell College, 1964 D. C. 

University of Maryland Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Yale University, 1964 New Jersey 

Yeshiva College, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1964 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 Delaware 

Fairleigh Dickinson College, 1964 New Jersey 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Oberlin College, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Georgia, 1964 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 



113 



J^ Matriculants 



Xame 

Hayes. Albert Jerome. Jr.. B.S. 
Herman. Melvin Herbert. Jr.. B.S. 
Hess. Douglas Boone 
Hewing. Alvin Nones. ITT, B.S. 
Hooper. Stephen LeRoy. A.B. 
Horowitz. Trvin Robert. B.S. 
Hubka. Ronald Richard, A.B. 
Evers. Kathryn Hussey. A.B. 
Hyman, George Frederic, B.S. 
Kane. James Gregory, Jr., B.S. 
Kaplan. William Douglas, B.S. 
Keech. Richard Charles, B.S. 
Keegan. Kirk Arlington. Jr., B.S. 
Knefely, George McLanahan, Jr., 

A.B. 
Knowles. Frederick Edwin, A.B. 
Koski. Carol Lee, B.S. 
Lancelotta. Charles Joseph. Jr., 

A.B. 
Lazarus. Barry Alan, A.B, 
Lefkov. Phyllis Diane, B.S. 
Legum. Ronald Michael, A.B. 
Levin. Gordon Leonard, B.S. 
Litt. Abraham Abba. B.S. 
Little. Raymond Roger, B.S. 
Littman. Philip. A.B. 
Long. William Broughton. III. B.S 
McGuire. Terence Aloysius, B.S. 
Eugene Robinson. Jr., 



1964 



1960 
1964 



McNinch 

A.B. 
Mahoney 
Malinow. 
Manekin. 



Carroll Davis, B.S. 

Stanford Howard. B.S. 

Steven Frederick. B.S. 
Mech. Karl Frederick. Jr., A.B. 
Mendelsohn. Herbert Eugene, A.B, 
Merlis. Anthony Logan. A.B. 
Mikesell, Kathryn Ann. A.B. 
Miller. Bruce Lawrence. A.B. 
Mitchell. Charles Robert. B.M.E. 
Morton. Bert Frederick. A.B. 
Mullis, Oscar Lee. Jr.. A.B. 
Nordgren. Allan Curtis, B.S 
Pastis. William K.. B.S. 
Pattee, Burton Charles, B.S. 
Pearson. Frederick Norman, A.B. 
Pollard. John David. Jr.. A.B. 
Pototsky. Ronald Stephen. A.B. 
Quillen. Carl Gray. A.B. 
Rankin. Thomas Vincent. B.S. 
Reed. William Arno. B.S. 
Reinstein. Leon. B.S. 
Renbaum, Joel William, A.B. 



Undergraduate School 
Morgan State College, 1958 
The Citadel, 1964 
Gettysburg College, 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Pennsylvania, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 
Trinity College, 1964 
Union College, 1964 
Loyola College, 1964 
University of Maryland, 
Johns Hopkins University, 
The Citadel, 1964 
Western Maryland College, 1964 

Harvard College, 1964 
Goucher College, 1964 
Loyola College, 1964 

Western Maryland College, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
Stanford University, 1962 
University of Maryland, 1964 
Georgetown University, 1964 
Swartlimore College, 1964 

University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Wesley an University, 1964 
Western Maryland College, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
University of California, 1964 
Western Maryland College, 1964 
Rensselaer Poly Institute, 1954 
Western Reserve University, 1963 
Eton College, 1962 
Massachusetts Inst, of Tech., 1963 
Howard University, 1963 
Antioch College, 1964 
Princeton University, 1964 
Syracuse University, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
Lafayette College, 1964 
Loyola College, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 



Home State 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Delaware 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

D. C. 

Maryland 

Florida 

Ohio 

N. Carolina 

Kansas 

Maryland 

Iowa 

Connecticut 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

D. C. 

Maryland 

Maryland 



Matriculants 1 ^ 



Name 

Riddlesberger, Merchline Mills, 

Jr., B.S. 
Riley, David Joseph, A.B. 
Rimash. Rorick Theodore, A.B. 
Rivera-Reyes, Luis Raphael, B.S. 
Roihl. Norbert Henry, A.B. 
Rosenbaum, Stephen David, A.B. 
Rosensteel, Robert Joseph, Jr., B.S 
Rosenstock, Jeffrey Gallant, A.B. 
Samorodin, Charles Steven 
Schaefer, Walter Charles 
Schlossberg, Barry Joel, A.B. 
Schonfeld, Burt Gary, A.B. 
Semins, Howard, A.B. 

Shack, Michael John 
Shaw, John Marx 
Spielman, Stuart Henry, A.B. 
Stafford, John Davis, A.B. 
Staufer, Wilfred Bryan 
Stuart, Franklin Richard, Jr. 
Stuppler, Stephen Allen, B.S. 
Tannenbaum, Alice Susan, B.S. 
Turner, Elizabeth Anne, B.S., M.S 

Vergne-Marini, Pedro Juan, B.S. 
Volcjak, Edward Eugene, B.S. 
Wambaugh, George Wilmar, Jr., 

B.S. 
Weimer, Stanley Robert, B.S. 

Welsh, James Joseph, Jr., B.S. 
Whitworth, Michael Franklin, A.B 
Widmeyer, Robert Samuel, II 
Williams, Randall Burdg 
Williams, William Morgan, B.S. 
Willis, Eugene, Jr. 
Winakur, Stuart, B.S. 
Winter, Stephen Lee, A.B. 
Woodrow, Kenneth M., A.B. 
Young, Edward John, A.B., M.S. 

Zavis, Daniel Ihor, A.B. 



Undergraduate School 
Dickinson College, 1964 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
University of Puerto Rico, 1964 
Cornell University, 1964 
Western Maryland College, 1964 
Loyola College, 1964 
Columbia College, 1964 
University of Maryland 
University of Maryland 
Johns Hopkins University, 
Johns Hopkins University, 
Washington and Jefferson 

College, 1964 
Randolph-Macon College, 
Union College, 1964 
Columbia University, 1964 
San Jose State College, 1963 
University of Maryland, 
University of Utah, 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
Maryville Col. 1958; Drexel Inst. 

of Tech., 1959 
University of Puerto Rico, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Loyola College, 1964 



1964 
1964 



1964 



Pennsylvania State University, 

1964 
Univ. of Md. — Pharmacy, 1963 
Brown University, 1963 
University of Maryland, 
Earlham College, 
University of Maryland, 
Western Maryland College, 
Univ. of Md. — Pharmacy, 1963 
University of Chicago, 1964 
Wesley an University, 1964 
Columbia Univ. 1959; Georgetown 

Univ. 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 



Home State 
Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

New York 

Puerto Rico 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

New York 

California 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Puerto Rico 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Illinois 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 



Name 

Abel, Elizabeth Ann, B.S. 
Alperstein, Joel Barry, B.S. 
Adalman, Stephen Morris, B.S. 



SECOND YEAR 

Class of 1967 

Undergraduate School Home State 

Colby Junior College, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

University of New York, 1963 New York 



1 f^ Matriculants 



Name 

Aveleyra. Enrique F., B.S. 
Banfield, Wm. John. B.S. 
Benenson. Michael Wm., A.B. 
Bigbee. John Albert, B.S. 
Blondin. Sandra Lee, B.S. 
Bloom. Wm. Frank, A.B. 
Blum. Barry Alan, A.B. 
Bollinger. Mary Sue. A.B. 
Boddie. Wm. Leon, B.S. 
Bright. Donald St., A.B. 
Burka, Barret Lewis, B.S. 
Butchart, John C, B.S. 
Carter, Colvin Cecil, B.S., M.S. 

Cohen. Edward Ralph, B.S. 
Crothers, Omar D., Ill, A.B. 
DeFelice. Charles E., B.S. 
Dobrzycki, Gerard D., B.S. 
Drake. Frances Dalton, B.S. 
Dunsford. Harold A., B.S. 
Dyro. Frances Mary, B.S. 
Eagle, Perry Alan, B.S. 
Earles. Gordon Homer 
Emory, Thomas E., A.B. 
Feldman. Harris J., A.B. 
Feldman, Larry Brian, A.B. 
Feuer, Henry, 

Fetterhoff, Ira Lincoln, A.B. 
Fine, Eric Michael, B.S. 
France, Robert Orville, A.B. 
Freed. Martin Irwin, A.B. 
Fulton. Edwin Cockey, B.S. 
Gareis, John Wm., 
Gimbel. Joseph Samuel, A.B. 
Glushakow, Allen Stanley, B.S. 
Goffman. Joel Henry, B.S. 
Hadden, David Malcolm, A.B. 
Hamby, James Lawrence, B.S. 
Hertzog, Robert Wm., B.S. 
Hobelman. Frederick H., A.B. 
Hoffman, Arthur Michael, B.S. 
Hricko, George Medard B.S. 
Hughes, Arthur Lee, B.S. 
Ignatowski, John Stephen, B.S. 
Jackson, Beverly Estelle, 
Jackson, Jean Marlene, B.S. 
Jones. Philip Dickson, A.B. 
Jordan. Charles Edward, III, A.B. 
Kaliner, Michael Aron B.S. 
Kandel Elizabeth Earle, A.B. 
Kester, Eugene Francis, A.B. 
Konrad, James Gerard, B.S. 
Kraemer, Elihu Mark. B.S. 



Undergraduate School Home State 

University of Maryland, 1963 D. C. 

Holy Cross College, 1963 Maryland 

Cornell University, 1963 New York 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Dickinson College, 1963 Maryland 

Univ. of North Carolina, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Immaculata College, 1962 Maryland 

Howard University, 1963 Maryland 

Princeton University, 1963 Maryland 

American University, 1963 D. C. 

Univ. of California, 1963 Hawaii 

Howard University, 1959; Maryland 
Elizabethtown, 1963 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Princeton University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Virginia Military Institute, 1963 Maryland 

Dickinson College, 1963 Connecticut 
Massachusetts Inst, of Tech., 1963 Maine 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1963 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, Maryland 

Carroll College, 1951 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1964 Maryland 
Franklin & Marshall College, 1964 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1963 Maryland 

Eastern Michigan Univ., 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Stanford University, 1957 California 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Morgan State College, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Morgan State College, Maryland 

Univ. of Rhode Island, 1963 Rhode Island 

Princeton University, 1963 Maryland 

Cornell University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Goucher College, 1963 Maryland 

New York University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Union College, 1963 New Jersey 



Matriculants ~\ F 7 



Name 

Kulik, Frank Albert, B.S. 
Lapes, George Anthony, B.S. 
Lattin, Gary Marc, A.B. 
Lee, Michael Morgan, A.B. 
Lessans, Stuart Harvey, A.B. 
Lichtenstein, Jack Ruben, 
Litle, Gary Scott, A.B. 
Mack, Richard Henry, B.S. 
Markowitz, Sheldon L., A.B. 
McCaffrey, Robert James, B.S. 
McHold, David Stanley, A.B. 
Mclntyre, John Milton, B.S. 
Metz, Joseph Francis, III, A.B. 
Miller, Louis Winaker, B.S. 
Mitnick, Alan Harvey, B.S. 
Myers, Boyd Douglas, A.B. 
Nelson, Fred Ritchie, A.B. 
Norman, Janet Hull, B.S. 
Norwood, Thomas Hyatt, A.B. 
Novicki, Donald Edward, B.S. 
O'Donnell, Thomas J., A.B. 
Oliver, Lawrence Stuart, A.A., 

A.B. 
Orlando, Joseph C, B.S. 
Ostroff, Edward B., B.S. 
Palmisano, Frank S., B.S. 
Paritzky, Arnold Z., A.B. 
Pelovitz, Howard Leon, B.S. 
Pfeffer, Bruce William, A.B. 
Pohost, Gerald M., B.S. 
Posner, Carol Jean, A.B. 
Pristoop, Allan Sanford, B.S. 
Raikes, Merrill C, III, A.B. 
Reymond, Ralph Daniel, A.B.- 

M.A. 
Rogers, John Francis, A.B. 
Rosen, Howard Roy, B.S. 
Routenberg, John Albert, B.S. 
Rowell, John Russell, Jr., B.S. 
Sachs, Marvin Coleman, B.S. 
Samuels, Jeffrey Allan, A.B. 
Sansone, Peter Frank, A.B. 
Schilling, Lee Howard, A.B. 
Seligman, Myron Lee, A.B. 
Sewell, John Calvert, B.S. 
Sherman, Michael Lewis, A.B. 
Sherr, Howard Paul, B.S. 
Shuster, Harold Frederick, B.S 
Skloven, Zellman David, A.B. 
Smith, John James, III, B.S. 
Snyder, David Michael, B.S. 
Sofferman, Robert Alan, A.B. 
Stapen, Joseph Ira, B.S. 



Undergraduate School 
Columbia University, 1960 
University of Maryland, 1962 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
Ohio Wesley an University, 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
University of Maryland, 
Temple University, 1961 
University of Notre Dame, 1963 
Washington University, 1963 
University of Rochester, 1962 
Morehead State College, 1962 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Loyola College, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Western Maryland College, 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 1962 
Wheaton College, 1959 
Brown University, 1960 
Mt. St. Mary's College, 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
George Washington University, 

1961 , 1963 
Loyola College, 1962 
Washington & Lee Univ., 1963 
Loyola College, 1962 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Georgetown University, 1963 
George Washington Univ., 1963 
Swarthmore College, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Colby College, 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 

1959, 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
Dickinson College, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 
University of Mai-yland, 1963 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
University of Pennsylvania, 1963 
San Diego State College, 1961 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Duke University, 1963 
College of the Holy Cross, 1963 
Stevens Inst, of Tech., 1954 
Cornell University, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Georgetown University, 1963 
Lehigh University, 1963 
University of Maryland. 1963 



Home State 

Maryland 

D. C. 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

Ohio 

Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Rhode Island 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

DC. 

New Jersey 

New York 



]Q Matriculants 



Name 

Stern, Kenneth Bernard, B.S. 
Strawn. Steven Rogers. A.B. 
Sussman, Michael David, A.B. 
Tierney, Lawrence M.. A.B. 
Valigorsky, John Michael, B.S. 
Vogel. Donald Bruce. B.S. 
Wardlaw, Stephen Clark, 
Warner. Larry Joseph, B.S. 
Wendt, Charles Edw. Jr., B.S. 
Wexler, Alan Michael, B.S. 
Wilner, Gary Norman, B.S. 
Wolf. Alan Frederick, B.S. 
Yakaitis, Ronald Win., B.S. 
Zorick Frank John, B.S. 



Undergraduate School Home State 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Miami University, 1963 California 

Washington & Lee Univ., 1963 Maryland 

Yale University, 1963 Connecticut 

University of Maryland, 1963 Pennsylvania 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 South Carolina 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 



Name 

Abramowitz. Leslie. B.A. 
Acker. Diane K., A.B. 
Arnold. James Edward, B.S. 
Bard, Richard Henry, A.B. 
Baron. Robert Bruce. A.B. 
Barrash. Jay Martin, B.S. 
Blaustein. Arnold Saul, A.B. 
Bosley. William Robert, A.B. 
Braunohler, Walter M., A.B. 
Brotman. Sheldon Irving, A.B. 
Rrous, Philip Panos, A.B. 
Brown. Mark Jeffrey, A.B. 
Bruther. William F., B.S. 

M.S. 
Bruther.William F., B.S. 
Buchness, Michael P., B.S. 
Burnham. Harold Arthur, 

B.S., M.A. 
Carty. James Walker, A.B. 
Clarke, Dana Harry, B.A. 
Classen, Charles Henry, B.S. 
Cohen, Arthur, B.S. 
Cohen, Ora Richard, B.S. 
Collins, Hammond Chas., B.S. 
Cook, David Michael, B.S. 
Cost, Francis Howard, A.B. 
Costleigh, Robert Piatt, B.S. 
Crist, Henry Spera, B.S. 
Cushing, Jane Frances, A.B. 
Daw, Albert Lee, A.B. 
Dvoskin. Philip Bryan, B.S. 
Ellis, Michael Anthony, B.S. 
Ertag, William David, A.B. 



THIRD YEAR 

Class of 1966 

Undergraduate School Home State 

George Washington Univ., 1962 Maryland 

Barnard College, 1962 New York 

Parson's College, 1962 Maryland 

Washington University, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Gettysburg College, 1962 Maryland 

Cornell University, 1962 Maryland 

Bucknell University, 1962 Maryland 

Univ. of Wisconsin, 1952, 1954 New York 

Mt. St. Mary's College, 1961 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1962 Maryland 

Union College, 1951; New York 
Middlehury College, 1952 

Washington & Lee Univ., 1962 Maryland 

Univ. of Massachusetts, 1962 Massachusetts 

Trinity College, 1962 Pennsylvania 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Boston College, 1961 Maryland 

Ohio University, 1962 Massachusetts 

Gettysburg College, 1962 West Virginia 

University of Oregon, 1962 Oregon 

Dickinson College, 1962 Pennsylvania 

Cornell University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Virginia, 1957 D. C. 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 New Jersey 



Matriculants 1 Q 



Name 

Fine, Stuart Lee, A.B. 
Flax, Richard Leroy, B.S. 
Fleming, Gary Allan, B.S. 
Fortier, Dwight Norbert, A.B. 
France, Joseph Martin, B.S. 
Gallahorn, George Edward, B.S. 
Gattis, Bruce Wayne, B.S. 
Gerber, Saul Bruce, B.S. 
Glass, Richard S., B.S. 
Gertsen, Kenneth C, A.B. 
Goldberg, Marshall C, A.B. 
Golladay, Donald E., B.S. 
Gombart, Augustin Karl, B.S. 
Gordon, Dennis Harvey 
Gordon, Stephen Frank, B.S. 
Gracia-Culpeper, Jose R., B.S. 
Green, John Gary, B.S. 
Grenzer, Louis E., A.B. 
Griffin, Dean Harp, M.S. 
Hameroff, Stephen Barry, B.S. 
Haney, Michael Joe, B.S. 
Hanson, Irvin Rivers, B.S. 
Harrison, Wm. Orville, A.B. 
Hawkins. James M., Jr., A.B. 
Hill, Thomas M., B.S. 
Hosick, Elizabeth C, A.B. 
Houston, John Joseph, B.S. 
Ingle, Larry Travis, A.B. 
Johnson, Franklin L., B.S. 
Kiracofe, Harry Louden, A.B. 
Koenig, Ronald Howard, A.B. 
Knowles, Raymond E., Jr., A.B. 
Koskinen. Kenneth Ralph, A.B. 
Krackow, Joe Arnold, A.B. 
Kramer, Lloyd Irvin, B.S. 
Leibowitz, Robert E., B.S. 
Long, Elmer Charles, B.S. 
Machiz, Stephen, A.B. 
Mann, John Hatch, A.B. 
Marcus, Joseph Baer, B.S. 
Marek, William James, B.S. 
Mason, William Terry, A.B. 
Mattsson, Carl Anthony, B.S. 
Miller, Albert Truman, B.S. 
Monfried, Allan Jerome, A.B. 
Music, Stanley Irvin, A.A., B.S. 

Oldroyd, John Jay, A.B. 
Ominsky, Barry E. L., B.S. 
Orfuss, Carl Joseph, B.S. 
Patrick, George Stanley, A.B. 
Plotnick, Gary David, A.B. 
Press, Samuel Eanet, B.S. 



Undergraduate School Home State 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 
Franklin & Marshall College, 1957 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1962 Maryland 

Georgetown University, 1962 Maryland 

University of New Mexico, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Utah State University, 1961 Utah 

George Washington Univ., 1962 New Jersey 

University of Puerto Rico, 1962 Puerto Rico 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

Duke University, 1962 Maryland 

American University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Wake Forest College, 1961 Maryland 

Stanford University, 1961 Oregon 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Georgetown University, 1962 New York 

Grinnell College, 1962 Michigan 

Georgetown University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Princeton University, 1960 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 
Franklin & Marshall College, 1962 Maryland 

Lehigh University, 1962 Ohio 

University of Maryland, 1962 Pennsylvania 

Dickinson College, 1962 New Jersey 

Kutztown College, 1960 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Yale University, 1961 New Jersey 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Western Reserve University, 1962 Ohio 

University of Utah, 1962 Utah 

Eastern Mennonite College, 1962 Maryland 

Duke University, 1962 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., Maryland 

1961, 1962 

University of Utah, 1961 Utah 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

West Virginia University, 1960 W. Virginia 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 



120 Matriculants 



Name 

Price, Charles Downey, A.B. 
Quintan. James A., Jr., B.S. 
Raine. Dudley Allen. Jr., B.S. 
Rawlings, Nina Cole, B.S. 
Reed, Richard Henry, B.S. 
Rivera-Rivera. Ernesto, B.S. 
Rokoff. Michael Jay, A.B. 
Schoen. Alan Elias, A.B. 
Schwartz. David Solomon, A.B. 
Serritella. Alfred A., B.S. 
Shuger, Richard David, B.S. 
Siple. Donald Joel, B.S. 
Sligar, Kurt Porter, B.A. 
Sopher, Irvin Murray, D.D.S. 
Spence James Wilson, B.S. 
Steers, John Edward, B.E.S. 
Steinbauer. David Jerome, D.V.M 
Stier. Jeffrey Stephen, B.S. 
Stern. Jack Irwin. B.A. 
Stram. Robert Alfonse, B.S. 
Susel. Richard Malcolm, B.S. 
Susel. Carolyn Joan (Pass), B.S. 
Swan. Beresford Mark. B.S. 
Trattler. Henry Leonard. B.S. 
Wittman. Stephen John, B.S. 
Young. Robert Runyan, A.B. 
Yuspa. Stuart Howard, A.B. 
Zalewski. Andrew Anthony, B.S. 
Zimmerly. James Gregory, A.B. 
Zucker, Sandra Lee, 



Undergraduate School Home State 

Western Maryland College, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Hampden-Sydney College, 1962 Maryland 

Morgan State College, 1957 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Puerto Rico, 1962 Puerto Rico 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Western Reserve University, 1960 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1961 Maryland 

University of Illinois, 1958 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Whitman College, 1962 Washington 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1956 Pennsylvania 

Univ. of Georgia-V. M., 1961 Maryland 

Bethany College, 1962 New York 

University of Vermont, 1962 Connecticut 

University of Maryland, 1962 Massachusetts 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Morgan State College, 1962 Bermuda 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Washington University, 1962 Missouri 

Jonhs Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Gannon College, 1962 Pennsylvania 

University of Md., Nursing Maryland 



FOURTH YEAR 



Name 

Aaronson, Jeffrey D., A.B. 
Agus. Zelman S., A.B. 
Albertsen, Verner 
Axley. John Harold, Jr., B.S. 
Baldwin. Brian Jay, A.B. 
Benfield. Donald Gary, B.S. 
Blum. Stanley Leonard, A.B. 
Brian Bruce Allen A.B. 
Brown, Charles Sidney, A.B. 
Brown, Harry James, B.S. 
Brown, Jeffrey Lee, A.B. 
Bruce, Wm. Gregory, A.B. 
Choate, Wm. Harold, B.S. 
Chong, Lap Chong, A.B. 
Cimonetti. Thos. Curran, A.B. 
Cley. Brenda M., A.B. 
Collins, Chester Cattell, Jr., B.S. 
Coplin, Michael N., A.B. 



Class of 1965 

Undergraduate School Home State 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Illinois 

Howard University, Denmark 

University of Maryland, 1961 Wisconsin 

George Washington Univ., 1960 New York 

University of Maryland, 1959 N. Carolina 

Lafayette College, 1961 Maryland 

William College, 1961 Maryland 

Yale University, 1957 Missouri 

University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Hobart College, 1961 New York 

Transylvania College, 1960 D. C. 

University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1960 Hong Kong 

St. Michael's Monastery, 1952 Massachusetts 

Fisk University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 New Jersey 

Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1960 New Jersey 



Matriculants J21 



Name 

Dick, Arthur Roland, A.B„ M.S. 

Dougherty, Patrick F., Jr., B.S. 
du Buy, Jean Bernard, A.B. 
Dumler, John Chas., Jr., B.S. 
Ehrlich, Gary Lee, B.S. 
Engelke, Geo. Edmund, B.S. 
Fesche, Paul Hudson, B.S. 
Fine, Louis Loeb, A.B. 
Friedler, Stanley, B.S. 
Frey, Allen Arthur, A.B. 
Gillis, David Jos., B.S. 
Goldner, Ronald, B.S. 
Goldsmith, Stanley, B.S. 
Gould, Wm. Michael, III, B.S. 
Gray, Timothy Kenney, B.S. 
Handwerger, Robert Louis 
Harris, David Robert, A.B. 
Harrison, Charles Simeon, A.B. 
Herold, Fred. Stephen, B.S. 
Highstein, Stephen Morris, A.B. 
Himelfarb, Terren M. B.S. 
Hisley, John Chas., A.B. 
Hoffman, Edw. Stewart, A.B. 
Howard, Susan L. 
Johnson, Barbara Lou B.S. 
Jones, Calvin Edw., B.S. 
Judman, Allen H., B.S. 
Kandler, Paul Alfred, A.B. 
Kistler, Galen Henry, B.S. 
Land, Allan Stephen, A.B. 
Landau, Earl Kaufman, A.B. 
Legat, Susan Traum, A.B. 
Legat, Wm. Edward, A.B. 
Levin, Sanford Leslie, A.B. 
Lewis, Frank Russell, Jr., A.B. 
Margolis Jay Stephen, A.B. 
Maun, John Wm., B.S. 
Mendez-Bryan, Carlos R. 
Mueller, John George, A.B., D.D. 

Olsen, Louis Odin, B.S. 
Olson, Janne Robert, B.S. 
Pelczar Michael Eugene, A.B. 
Peters, George, B.S. 
Poiley, Jeffrey Edward, A.B. 
Reilly, Michael John, B.S. 
Roane, Donald Cornelius, B.S. 
Robinson, Emily Ann, A.B. 
Rosenstein, Alfred Barry, A.B. 
Saiontz, Henry Allan, A.B. 
Sattenspiel, Sigmund L., B.S. 
Schwartz, Martin Samuel B.S. 



Undergraduate School Home State 

Bethel Coll., 1955; Canada 

University of Wichita, 1958 

Mt. St. Mary's College, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

Washington & Lee Univ., 1961 Maryland 

Dickinson College, 1961 Maryland 

Georgetown University, 1960 New Jersey 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Cornell University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 New York City 

Loyola College, 1960 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Michigan State, 1961 Maryland 

Duke University, 1961 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

University of California, 1960 California 

Kent State University, 1958 Arkansas 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 New York 

Rensselaer, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Washington & Lee University Maryland 

University of Rochester, 1961 New York 

University of Maryland Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1961 D. C 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 New York 

Muhlenberg, 1961 Pennsylvania 

Johns Hopkins University, 1960 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1961 D. C. 

University of Maryland, 1961 Illinois 

Yale University, 1961 New Jersey 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 
Princeton, 1961 

Western Maryland College, 1960 Maryland 

Washington College, 1961 W. Virginia 

University of Puerto Rico, 1961 Puerto Rico 

.Duke Univ., 1953; Univ. of Md.- Oklahoma 

Dental School, 1957 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1961 Wisconsin 

Loyola College, 1960 Maryland 

Stevens Inst, of Technology, 1954 New York 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Howard University, 1961 Maryland 

Vassar College, 1961 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Wisconsin New York 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 



122 



Matriculants 



Name 

Segal, Hannah Joan, B.S. 
Shope, Earl Samuel, A.B. 
Signor, Wm. Edson, B.S. 
Sjolund, Geo. Clarence, Jr 
Snyder, Larry Albert, B.S. 
Stasiowski, M. Peter, B.S. 
Steffy, John Miller, A.B. 
Stein Harry Calvin, B.S. 
Steinberg, Louis Edw., B.S. 
Sugar, Fred Nelson, B.S. 
Tabor, Harry David, A.B. 
Tokar, Elliot S., B.S. 
Toskes, Philip Paul, A.B. 
Virgilio, Richard Wm., A.B. 
Weinstock, Joseph Saul, A.B. 
Whelan, Philip Joseph, B.S. 
White, Daniel H., B.S. 
Whitelock, Victoria P., B.S. 
Whitlock, Robert Nolen, B.S. 
Wimmer, Wm. Carey, A.B. 
Wingfield, Thos. Whetsell, A.B 



Undergraduate School Home State 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1961 Pennsylvania 

University of Maryland, 1961 New York 

A.B. Tufts University, 1956 Connecticut 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

University of Calif., Los Angeles California 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

Colgate, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

George Washington Univ., 1961 Pennsylvania 

St. Mary's College, 1961 New Jersey 

University of Maryland, 1959 N. Carolina 

Loyola College, 1961 S. Carolina 

Western Maryland College, 1961 Virginia 

Univ. of North Carolina, 1961 N. Carolina 



Summary and Geographical 
Distribution of Matriculants 



Summary 

September 10, 1964, to June 5, 1965 

Male Female Total 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 84 7 91 

THIRD YEAR CLASS 107 6 113 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 115 9 124 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 122 8 130 

428 30 458 



Summary 



September 9, 1963, to June 6, 1964 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS 


80 


7 


87 


THIRD YEAR CLASS 


88 


7 


95 


SECOND YEAR CLASS 


. . . . 112 


6 


118 


FIRST YEAR CLASS 


.... 118 


10 


128 




398 


30 


428 



123 



124 Geographical Distribution 



1st. 2nd. 3rd. 4th. Total 



Bermuda 

California 

District of Columbia 4 

Connecticut 1 

Delaware 2 

Florida 

Hawaii 1 

Idaho 

Illinois 1 

Iowa 1 

Rhode Island 

New Jersey 7 

Hong Kong 

Maine 

Maryland 96 

Massachusetts 3 

Michigan 

New York 5 

Ohio 1 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 4 

Puerto Rico 2 

South Carolina 1 

Utah 

Virginia 1 

West Virginia 

Washington 



Total 130 





1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


4 


1 


1 


10 


3 


1 




5 
2 






1 


1 

1 




1 




1 
1 
1 


2 






2 


3 


3 


3 


16 






1 


1 


1 






1 


104 


86 


76 


362 




3 




6 




1 




1 


3 


2 


6 


16 




2 




3 




1 




1 


2 


4 




10 




2 


1 


5 


1 






2 




3 




3 
1 




2 




2 




1 




1 


124 


114 


90 


458 



Medical Alumni Association 



OFFICERS 1964-1965 
President 

J. HOWARD FRANZ, M.D. 

President-elect 

C. PARKE SCARBOROUGH, M.D. 

Vice-Presidents 

F. A. HOLDEN, M.D. ROBERT W. FARR, M.D. JOHN E. MORAN, M.D. 

Treasurer Secretary 

WALTER E. KARFGIN, M.D. THOMAS B. CONNOR, M.D. 

Executive Director Executive Secretary 

WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, M.D. MRS. LOUISE GIRKIN 

Board of Directors Representatives to General 

Harold P. Biehl, M.D. Alumni Council 

Rennert M. Smelser, M.D. J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

Joseph D'Antonio, M.D. Robert B. Goldstein, M.D. 

William J. Supik, M.D. William H. Triplett, M.D. 
Hugh B. McNally, M.D. 

Emmanuel A. Schimunek, M.D. Representatives, Editorial Board 

William H. Kammer, Jr., M.D. J. Howard Franz, M.D., ex-officio 

Robert B. Goldstein, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

John D. Young, Jr., M.D. John F. Savage, M.D. 

George H. Yeager, M.D., ex-officio C. Vernon Williamson, M.D. 
Gibson J. Wells, M.D., ex-officio 

Nominating Committee Representatives, Faculty Board 

George H. Yeager, M.D., Chairman J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

Gibson J. Wells, M.D., ex-officio Gibson J. Wells, M.D. 
Raymond M. Cunningham, M.D. 
David A. Levy, M.D. 
Donald W. Mintzer, M.D. 



125 






Endowment Fund 



The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

CHARLES REID EDWARDS, M.D., President E. ROBERT KENT 

WETHERBEE FORT, M.D. HARRY CLIFTON BYRD 

AUSTIN C. DIGGS H. VERNON ENEY 

JAMES R. KARNS, M.D. FREDERIC M. HEWITT 

everett s. diggs, m.d., Secy.-Treas. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its 
legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuating. Except as may be 
otherwise directed by the donor with respect to particular funds, the powers 
of the Trustees are limited to the expenditure of the interest or income 
derived from the various funds or donations which are applied as directed 
by the donors for the benefit of the University. They may be made to the 
general or University Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other depart- 
ment of the University. If intended for the School of Medicine, they may 
be given to the general medical fund or to some special object, as building, 
research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, 
scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor will 
be strictly regarded. Checks should be made payable to The Trustees of 
the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland, and sent to Dr. 
Everett S. Diggs, 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore, Maryland 21202. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR REQUEST 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the law of 
the state of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Medicine 



(Here state amount or describe property) 
126 



Faculty Index 



Abeshouse G. A 74 

Abrams, R. C 74 

Acton, C. B 54 

Adams, E 48, 49, 52, 85 

Adams, J. E 64, 99 

Adams, T. R 74, 108 

Adelman, W. J., Jr 69, 103 

Agapitos, G. N 54 

Akin, S. B 70 

Albright, M. J 70 

Alderman, G. C 74, 109 

Amourex, R. L 61 

Andersch, M. A 54, 89, 92 

Anderson, A. R 70, 105 

Anderson, A. W 54 

Andres, R 54, 90 

Anilane, J 50, 83 

Antlitz, A. M 54, 91 

Ardinger, J. S 62 

Arnold, J. G., Jr 48, 74, 109 

Aronson, H 70 

Ascher, E 70 

Ashman, L 54 

Atkins, R. M 50, 83 

Aton, J. K 60 

Attar, S 74, 108, 110 

Atwood, J. M 51 

Ault, V. L 66 

Austin, W. J 85, 108, 109 

Aziz, M. A 53 

Bacharach, D 54, 92 

Baker, J. T 62 

Baker, L. R 51 

Baldwin, R. W 66, 101 

Ballard, M. B 62 

Balsam, F. J 69 

Band, R. 1 70 

Barnett, H. C 53, 54, 88, 92 

Barnett, R. M 62 

Barraclough, C. A 69, 103 

Barrett, H. V 69, 104 



Barry, J. Q 69, 103 

Bartemeir, L. H 70, 105 

Bass, B 74 

Bauernschrub, G. M 66 

Baumgartner, R 68 

Baxter, W. F., Jr 69, 104 

Beacham, E. G 54, 90 

Beck, H. M 62 

Beech, J. A 79 

Belcher, H. V 74 

Bell, F. K 68 

Benitez, E. E 60, 69 

Bereston, E. S 54, 89, 92 

Bernstein, H. N 64, 98 

Berry, R. Z 74 

Bessman, S. P. ... 49, 52, 66, 85, 101 

Besson, E. H 66 

Beyer, O. C 75 

Bianco, E. A 54 

Biehl, H. P 75 

Blair, E 75, 110 

Blake, D. A 68 

Blake, W. D 48, 49, 69, 103 

Blanchard, C. L 75, 108, 109 

Blazek, C. J 54 

Blide, R. M 54, 94 

Bloedorn, F. G 48, 74, 107 

Blum, L. V 54 

Boaz, T. D 64, 98 

Bode, V. C 52, 85 

Boggio, J. P 62 

Bongardt, H. F 75, 108 

Borges, F. J 47, 49, 54, 90, 94 

Bormel, P 75 

Bowen, M 70 

Bowie, H. C 50, 75, 83, 108 

Bradford, N. H 70 

Bradley, J. E 65, 101 

Brady, L 62, 98 

Brager, S. H 54 

Brantigan, O. C 50, 75, 83 



127 



128 Facult y lndex 

Braude, M. C 70 

Breitenecker, R 64, 99 

Briele, H. A 75 

Brody, E. B 48, 49, 70, 105 

Bronushas, J. B 55 

Brown, A. V 52, 85 

Brown, G. P 70 

Brown, R 74 

Bryan, V 61 

Bryant, H. H 68, 102 

Bulkeley, J. T 60 

Bundick, W. R 55, 92 

Burgin, B 55 

Burgison, R. M 47, 49, 68, 102 

Burkart, T. J 64, 99 

Burnett, J. W 55, 90 

Burns, H. B 75 

Burns, T. A 51 

Buxton, R. W 48, 49, 74, 108 

Byerly, M. P 55 

Cader, G 55 

Campbell, E. W 75, 110 

Caplan, L. H 66 

Carey, T. N 55. 89 

Carr, C. J 68 

Carroll, D. G 55, 90 

Carroll, E. B Ill 

Carson, J. E 70 

Carter, J. F 66, 68 

Cascorbi, H. F 68, 102 

Cavonius, C. R 64, 98 

Cerino, M. T 50, 75, 83 

Chambers, J. W 75 

Chambers, T. R 49, 75 

Chandler, R. W 61 

Charkes, N. D 60 

Christensen, O. D 62 

Church, G 55 

Ciambotti, A 60 

Clemmens, R. L 66, 70, 101, 111 

Coblentz, R. C 75 

Cohen, B. S 55, 90 

Cohen, J. H 55 

Cohen, H 46, 62 

Cohn, J. V 70 

Cole, G. A 61 

Coleman, P. D 47, 69, 103 

Connor, T. B 55, 89, 93, 111 

Cook, E. E., Jr 55 

Coplan, R. S 62 

Cordi, J. M 66 

Cornbrooks, E. 1 62, 98 

Coronho, V 60 

Correa, R. A 70 

Cotter, E. F 46, 55, 89, 94 



Councill, W. A. H., Jr 75 

Covington, E. E 75 

Cowen, J. R 70 

Cowley, R. A 48, 75, 108 

Cox, E. F 47, 49, 75, 108 

Cox, W. F., Ill 55 

Creamer, J. J 64, 98 

Crispens, C. H., Jr 46, 50, 83 

Crosby, R. M. N 66, 75 

Cross, E., Jr 55 

Cross, R. J 75, 109 

Cuccia, C. A 74, 107 

Cunha, J. A 71 

Cunningham, R. M 75 

Durago, L 61 

Davidson, C. N 74, 107 

Davis, G. H 62, 98 

Davis, J. R 55 

Davis, M. H 55 

Davis, N. M 71 

Deane, G. E 66 

Dembo, D. H 55, 91 

Dennis, J. M 48, 49, 74, 107 

Derbyshire, R. L 71 

De Vincentis, M. L 75 

Diamond, L. S 75 

Diener, R. L 62 

Dietz, A. J., Jr 68 

Diggs, E. S 62, 98 

Dixon, D. McC 62, 98 

Doane, M. G 52 

Dodd, W. A 62 

Donahoe, K 71 

Donati, E. J 50, 83 

Dordai, A 62 

Doss, R. H 71 

Dowling, A. S 69, 104, 105 

Dudley, W. C 55 

Due, D. Z 66 

Duffy, T. E 68 

Dumler, J. C 62 

Dunnigan, W. C 75 

Duritz, G 68 

Durkan, J. P 62 

Duvall, R. G., Jr 55 

Dwyer, F. P 75 

Eastland, J. S 55. 89 

Ebbesson, S. 50, 83 

Ebeling, W. C, III 55, 90, 93 

Ebner, F~F 51 

Edwards, M 75 

Ehrlich, D 63 

Eichler, M 71, 105 

Einberg, E 71 






Faculty Index J29 



Ellinger, G. F 55, 89 

Ellis, F. A 55, 89, 92 

Emery, A. J., Jr 46, 52, 85 

Engelman, J 61 

Engnoth, M. L 75, 109 

Entwisle, G 48, 49, 55, 

69, 90, 94, 104 

Esmond, W. C 55, 75 

Evans, T 61 

Everett, D. J 76 

Ewald, R 61 

Eylar, O. R 46, 49, 61, 95 

Facelo, M. R 63 

Fajer, A. B 69, 103 

Fargo, L. K 75 

Farinholt, L. W 71, 105 

Fearing, W. L 55 

Feinberg, G. N 64, 98 

Feldman, M., Jr 55 

Fiedler, K. R 71, 105 

Field, E. G 66, 101 

Figge, F. H. J 48, 49, 50, 83 

Findley, J. D 71 

Fineman, J 66, 101 

Finkelstein, A. H 47, 66, 101 

Finlay, T. H 52 

Finn, R. B 71 

Firminger, H. 1 48, 49, 65, 99 

Fiset, L. G 55 

Fiset, P 61 

Fisher, R. S 64, 99, 100 

Fitzpatrick, W. N 71 

Fitzpatrick, V. D., Jr 63 

Fleischer, C. J 69, 104, 105 

Flotte, C. T 47, 75, 108 

Flynn, P. D 55 

Forster, I. A., Jr 71 

Fort, W 55, 90 

Fox, S. L 47, 64, 98 

Frankel, J 66, 71 

Freeman, 1 56, 90 

Freimuth, H. C 65, 99, 100 

Friedenwald, E. B 49, 66 

Friedman, M 56 

Friedman, M. P 53 

Funk, A 56 

Furnari, J. C 56 

Gakenheimer, W. A 56 

Gallager, L. R 53 

Gallaher, J. P 63 

Galleher, E. P 47, 75, 110 

Ganis, F. M 52, 56, 85 

Garcia, R 63 

Gareis, L. C 63 



Garlick, W. L 76, 108, 110 

Gaskel, J. H 76 

Gentry, W. D., Jr 63 

George, J. E 53 

Gerlach, J. J 76, 109 

Gessner, J. E 69, 105 

Gilbert, A. K 71 

Gillis, A. C 62 

Gillis, F. W 76 

Gladue, J. R 56 

Glaser, E. M 69, 103 

Glaser, K 66, 71, 101 

Glick, G 51 

Glick, S. S 66, 101 

Gold, M. 1 46, 51, 85 

Goldberg, J. R 64, 98 

Goldiamond, 1 71 

Goldmann, H 71 

Goldstein, M 56 

Goldstein, R. B 76 

Gonzalez, L. F 56, 91 

Good, T. A 66, 101 

Goodman, H 66 

Goodman, L. E 76 

Gordon, B. S 71 

Gorham, J. R 53 

Gorten, M. K 47, 66, 101 

Goshorn, G 66 

Govatos, G 76, 108 

Greenstein, G. H 76 

Gregg, D. E 79 

Gregg, M. B 53, 88 

Greisman, S. E 56, 69, 89, 103 

Grenell, R. G 71, 105 

Grenzer, W. H 56 

Gross, A 71 

Gross, G. M 71 

Grossman, M. S 66, 101 

Gryder, R. M 52, 85 

Guerin, P. F 65, 99, 100 

Gundry, L. P 56, 89 

Gutches, G. A., Jr 71 

Guttmacher, M. S 71, 105 

Hachtel, F. W 49, 61 

Haines, J. S 76, 108 

Hall, W. M 63 

Hamberry, L. G 76 

Hammel, C. L 66, 101 

Han, Y. H 51 

Hankin, S. J 56 

Hanowell, E. G 56 

Harmon, L 56 

Harrington, B 61 

Harris, W. M 71 



130 Facult y Index 



Hart, W. M 64, 98 

Haskins, A. L 48, 49, 62, 98 

Hatgi, J. N 61 

Hawkins, J. E 56 

Hawthorne, I. H 79 

Hayleck, M. L 66 

Hazama, H 72 

Healy, R. F 76 

Hearn, J. B 74, 107 

Hebb, D. B 76 

Heck, A. F 62, 97 

Hecker, E 63 

Hecker, W. A. 66 

Heefner, W. A 65 

Heinz, E. C 53, 56 

Helbig, D. W 61 

Heldrich, F. J., Jr 66, 101 

Helfrich, W. G 56 

Helfrich, R. F 76 

Helrich, M 49, 51, 85 

Henderson, CM 76 

Henderson, E. G 52 

Henderson, M. M 47, 69, 104 

Hendry, M. H 69 

Hepner, W. R 49, 66, 101 

Hersperger, W. G 56 

Hetherington, L. H 56, 89 

Hettleman, H. J 63 

Hicken, W. J 65 

Hilger, T 76 

Hill, CD 63 

Hirschfeld, J. H 76 

Hitchman, I. L 72 

Hogan, J. F 76 

Hogan, J. F., Jr 76 

Holbrook, W. A 76 

Holden, W 72, 105 

Holder, W. L 72 

Hollander, M. B 56, 92 

Hollingsworth, N. B 46, 52, 85 

Holljes. H. W. J 56 

Hooper, Z. V 56 

Hopps, H. C 65, 99 

Hornick. R. B 56, 90, 94 

Howe, E. S 72 

Howell, C 66, 101 

Hubbard, T. B„ Jr 76, 108 

Huffer, V 47, 72, 105, 111 

Hulfish, B 62, 72, 97 

Hull, H. C 76, 108 

Hundley, J. M., Jr 49, 63 

Hybl. A 52, 86 

Hyman, N. B 74, 107 

Ingraham, M. B 72 



I-Po Ho, 1 53 

Irani, B. N 79 

Irwin, R. C 66 

Isaacs, B. H 76, 109 

Jackson, E. B 56, 94 

Jacobson, M. W 56, 90 

James, W. E 63 

Jantz, E. M 66, 101 

Jennings, F. L 49, 76 

Jensen, P. J 47, 67, 101 

Jiji, R 56, 90, 92 

Johnston, D. F 72 

Jones, D. T 72 

Kallins, E. S 56 

Kaltreider, D. F 49, 63, 98 

Kammer, W. H., Jr 56 

Kaplan, S. D 52 

Kappelman, M 67 

Kardash, T 63 

Karfgin, A 56 

Karfgin, W. E 56 

Karns, C F 76 

Karns, J. R 26, 46, 56, 89 

Karpeles, L. M 47, 69, 103 

Karu, A. E 52 

Kasik, F. T., Jr 57 

Kassel, L. E 57 

Katase, R. Y 65, 99 

Kaufman, T. Y 61 

Kay, G 65 

Kayser, F. A 76, 109 

Kemick, I. B 57 

Kenny, T. J 67 

Kent, Y. V 52 

Keown, L. L 57 

Kerr, H. D 57, 94 

Kiefer, L 65, 99 

Kime, P. W 65, 99 

King, J. D 57 

Kirby, W. H 79 

Kirkpatrick, C. N 57 

Kitlowski, E. A 76, 108 

Klatt, K. M 79 

Klee, G. D 72, 105 

Klein, D. F 67 

Klimt, C R 53, 57, 88 

Knisely, M. H 79 

Kochman, L. A 57, 91 

Kogon, A 53, 69, 88, 104 

Kohlmeyer, W. A 72 

Komatsu, S 79 

Korman, W 63 

Kowitz, T. A 57, 94 

Krahl, V. E 46, 50. 83 



Faculty Index 1 Q 1 



Kramer, D. N 79 

Kramer, H. C 76 

Kramer, M. D 62, 72, 97 

Krause, L. A 57, 89 

Krevans, J. R 57 

Krishnappa, I. S 72 

Kronmeyer, R 61 

Kubie, L. S 72, 105 

Kuehn, F. G 57 

Kurland, S. H 67 

Kyper, F. T 76 

Lancaster, R. G 57, 92 

Langenfelder, H. E 76 

Lavenstein, A. F 67 

Layne, E. C 52, 67, 85 

Leach, C. E 57, 90 

Le Bouvier, J. D 76 

Lee, Y.-C 57, 90, 91 

Legum, S 57, 90 

Lentz, G. A., Jr 67, 69, 101, 105 

Lerman, L. R 57 

Lerner, P. F 57, 90 

Leslie, F. E 57 

Liu, S.-J 57 

Leveque, T. F 18, 46, 51, 83 

Levin, H 65, 99 

Levin, H. E 61, 95 

Levin, L. A 72 

Levin, M 57 

Levin, N 63 

Levy, D. A 57, 90 

Levy, K 57 

Levy, W 52 

Lewandowski, A. A 57 

Lewis, H. A 72 

Linberg, E. J 46, 47, 49, 

76, 108, 110 

Lindenberg, R 65, 99, 100 

Linhardt, E. G 51, 83 

Lippman, E. M 67 

Lisansky, E. T 49, 57, 72, 

89, 105, 111 

Lister, L 57 

Loker, F. F 77 

London, R. L 47, 67, 101 

Long, W. B 77 

Love, W. S 49, 57 

Lovice, H 57 

Ludlam, K. W 53 

Lyden, R. J 57 

Lynn, W. D 77 

Lyon. J. A., Jr 47, 67, 74, 101, 107 

Mackie, J. B 72 

Madeloff, M 61 



Magruder, W. W 72 

Maher, E. E 67 

Mahoney, F. 1 70, 104, 105 

Mallis, N 77 

Mansberger, A. R., Jr 47, 77, 

108, 111 

Mansdorfer, G. B 67, 101 

Marek, C. B 63 

Marine, D. N 57, 94 

Marsh, J. M 72 

Martin, C. W 63 

Masaitis, C 79 

Maseritz, 1 77 

Masters, J. M 57 

Matchar, J. C 57 

Matthews, M. E 67 

Maxwell, G. A 63 

Mays, H. B 47, 77, 108, 110 

McAslan, T. C 52 

McCarthy, V. C 53 

McClure, S. R 72 

McCrumb, F. R., Jr 48, 49, 

53, 57, 61, 67, 

88, 89, 94, 101 

McCue, C 72 

McDonald, W. A 53 

McElwain, H. B 77 

McFadden, R. B 51, 83 

McKenzie, W. R 77 

McLaughlin 110 

McLean, G 58, 90 

McNally, H. B 63, 98 

McQueen, J. D 72 

Mech, K. F 51, 77, 83 

Meinert, C. L 53 

Meisels, A. A 64, 98 

Mendonca, P. P 79 

Merani, E. R 61 

Merkel, W. C 65, 99 

Merlis, J. K 49, 58, 62, 

67, 89, 97, 103 

Merrill, G. G 58, 90 

Messer, J. W 53 

Michael, T. D 77 

Michaelis, M " 

Michaelson, E 77 

Middlebrook, G 53, 88 

Middleton, E. B 46, 63, 98, 111 

Millan, L. J 77 

Miller, G. H 63 

Miller, J. E 77 

Miller, J. M 77, 110 

Miller, N. L 67 



132 Facult y index 



Miller, S 58, 92 

Mintzer, D. W 58 

Misenhimer, H. R 63 

Monroe, R. R 47, 72, 105 

Moore, K 77 

Moores, J. D 77 

Morgan, A. M 68 

Morgan, W. K. C 58, 90, 94 

Morgan, Z. R 58 

Morris, F. K 47, 63, 98 

Morrison, J. H 63, 98 

Morrison, S 58, 89, 93 

Morrison, T. H 58, 89 

Mosberg, W. H 77, 108 

Mosser, R. S 47, 62, 

67, 97, 101 

Moszkowski, E. F 63, 98 

Mott, T., Jr 72 

Mould, L. L 63 

Moulton, G. A 68, 79 

Mujeeb, M 53 

Mullan, P. A 67 

Muller, S. E 58, 90 

Mullins, L. J 48, 49, 52, 86 

Munford, R. S 63, 98 

Murphy, A. M 52 

Muse, J. E., Jr 58 

Musser, R. D 68, 102 

Myers, J. A 58 

Myers, J. C 58 

Myers, W. F 61, 95 

Nair, P 67 

Nasdor, H. H 63 

Natale, R. D 77, 109 

Navarro, E 74, 107 

Nelson, A. T 52 

Nelson, E 48, 49, 

62, 97, 111 

Nelson, J. W 77 

Niermarin, W. A 67 

Nolan, J. J 58 

Noriega, A. R 61 

Noshpitz, J 72 

Novak, T. M 70 

Novey, S 74 

Novin, N 51, 77, 83 

Nur Ahmad 53, 88 

O'Connor, J. C 72, 105 

Oleynick, A. H 62, 73, 97 

Ollodart, R. M 79, 108 

O'Mansky, B 67 

O'Mansky, S. 1 58 

O'Neill, J. J 47, 49, 68, 102 

O'Neill, L 74 



Ordonez, J. V 61 

O'Rourk, T. R 77, 108, 109 

Osterman, J. V 61 

Otenasek, F. J 77 

Ousler, D. A 58 

Overall, B. C 74 

Packard, A. G 77 

Padget, D. H 79 

Panayis, A. P 63 

Papadopoulos, C 58 

Parker, R. T 58, 89 

Parker, W. S 67 

Patterson, J 52 

Peake, C. W 77 

Pearson, J. W 52 

Peckham, R. H 64, 98 

Perry, R 61 

Pessagno, D. J 77, 108 

Petty, C. S 65, 99, 100 

Pfeiffer, C. B 51 

Phelan, P. C, Jr 77 

Phillips, F. E 73 

Pierpont, R. Z 51, 77, 83 

Pijanowski, W. J 58 

Pinter, G. G 69, 103 

Plugge, F. W., IV 77 

Poffenbarger, A. L 61 

Polachek, A. A 58 

Pollack, S. L 68 

Polley, E. H 51, 83 

Pomerantz, S 52, 85 

Pope, B 47, 73, 105 

Porter, H. P 77 

Powder, J. R 77 

Queen, J. E 58 

Queene, R 73 

Quinn, M. K 58 

Rafferty, F. T., Jr 42, 73, 105 

Raher, J 73, 105 

Rahman, A. N 58 

Ramapuram, G. M 58 

Ramirez-Rivera, J 58, 94 

Ramsay, F. J 51, 83 

Randall, L. L 63 

Randall, R 58 

Randol, C. L 67 

Raskin, H. F 46, 58, 

89, 93, 111 

Raskin, J 58, 90, 92 

Rasmussen, P 47, 65, 99 

Reese, J. M 63, 98 

Reed, J. W 73 

Rehberger, J. M 78 

Reid, J. R 73, 105 



Faculty Index J 33 



Reidy, J. J 73 

Reifschneider, C. A 78 

Reifschneider, H. E 51, 78, 83 

Reimann, D. L 65, 99 

Reinke, W. A 70, 104 

Reiter, R. A 58, 90 

Renner, 1 67 

Restivo, M. C 74, 107 

Revell, S. T. R., Jr 58, 89 

Rever, W. B., Jr 78 

Redding, J. S 52 

Rich, B. S 77 

Richards, R. D 48, 49, 64, 98 

Richardson, A. D 70, 104, 105 

Richardson, P. F 47, 48, 

70, 104, 105 

Rienhoff, W. F 78 

Risser, A. C, Jr 53, 61 

Rivera, A. M 67 

Robbins, M. A 78 

Roberts, D 61 

Robertson, R. G 54, 61 

Robinson, H. A 73 

Robinson, H. M., Jr. . . 59, 89, 92, 105 

Robinson, J. E 74, 107 

Robinson, K. E 73 

Robinson, R. C. V 59, 89, 92 

Rogers, H. L 78 

Roop, D. J 59 

Rorabaugh, M. R 61 

Rosen, L. S 52 

Rosenholtz, M 47, 65, 99 

Rosenzweig, E. C 46, 61, 95 

Rosin, J. D 78 

Rosso, R. G 52, 85 

Rothfeld, B 59 

Rothmund, H 67 

Rovelstad, H 36 

Rozman, R. S 68, 102 

Rubin, S 59 

Rudo, F. G 102 

Rusche, E 59, 94 

Sata, L. S 73 

Salman, K. N 52 

Sarles, R. M 67 

Saunders, O. H 67 

Scarborough, C. P 78, 108 

Schaefer, J. F 68, 78 

Schamroth, L 59 

Scherlis, 1 78 

Scheriis. L. . .46, 48, 49, 59, 67, 89, 

91, 111 
Scherlis, S 59, 67, 90, 91, 101 



Schnaper, N 73 

Schocket, S. S 64, 98 

Schroeder, W. C 61 

Schubart, A. F 49, 59, 89, 91 

Schultz, R. B 65, 99 

Schuster, M. M 59 

Schwartz, B. C 63 

Schwartz, F. D 61 

Schwartz, T. A 78, 108, 109 

Scott, H. B 59 

Scott, W 73 

Seabold, W. M 67 

Seebert, C. T 52 

Seegar, J. K., Jr 63, 98 

Segall, S 59 

Selvin, B. L 52 

Serra, L. M 59, 90 

Settle, W. B 51, 78, 83 

Seydel, G. H 74, 107 

Shapiro, A 59, 90, 92 

Sharrett, J. 78 

Shaw, C 46 

Shea, W. H 59 

Shear, J 59 

Sheehan, V. E 79 

Shell, J. H., Jr 63 

Sherman, J 59 

Sherrard, M. L 59 

Sherrill, E. B 59 

Shiftman, G 68, 101 

Shipley, E. R 78 

Shocket, B. R 59 

Siegel, I. A 46, 63, 98 

Siegman, A. W 73 

Sigman, B 68 

Silberman, R 61 

Silver, A. A 59 

Simon, S. H 68 

Simpson, D. G 59, 94 

Sina, B 59 

Sinaly, N. P 59 

Singleton, R. T 59, 90, 91 

Sinton, W. A., Jr 68 

Sister Mary Blanche 52 

Siwinski, A. G 47, 78, 108 

Sjodin, R. A 46, 52, 86 

Smith, A. G 18, 61, 95 

Smith, D. C 49, 69 

Smith, F. B 68, 101 

Smith, S 59, 90 

Smith, S. W 63 

Smith, V 59, 89, 93 

Snyder, J. N 59 



134 Faculty Index 



Snyder, M. J. 49, 59, 61, 89, 94, 95 

Solomon. N 69, 103 

Speed, W. C, III 59 

Spencer. H. R 49, 65 

Spicer. W. S., Jr 60, 89, 94. Ill 

Spragins, M 68, 101 

Spurling, C. L 60, 89, 92 

Stambler, A. A 68 

Starcke, H 61 

Stauffer, J. C 60, 78 

Steinbach, S. R 60 

Stern, M. D 46, 52, 86 

Stevens, A. L.. 52, 85 

Stevenson, T. M 85 

Stewart, C. W 73 

Stewart, E. H 78, 108 

Stichel, F. L 78 

Stodghill, W 61 

Stone, W 46, 48, 49, 111 

Stowdl, R. E 65, 99 

Strahan, J. E 60, 92 

Strauch, M 79 

Strautz, R. L 51 

Styrt, J 73 

Suffel, B. H 70 

Sunday, S. D 60 

Supik, W. J 78 

Swall, R. F 54 

Sweeney, D 61 

Swisher, K. Y., Jr 60, 90, 91 

Szabo, A. DeK 79 

Tack, O. C, Jr 54 

Tayback, M 70, 104 

Tanega, A. L 105 

Tansey, J. J 78, 109 

Tarr, N 78 

Taubert, H. D 63 

Teitelbaum, H. A 60, 62, 90, 97 

Thomas, D. B 54 

Thomas, W. N 74, 107 

Thompson, G. B 79 

Thompson, R. K 78, 108, 109 

Tigertt, W. D 60, 89 

Tinker, F. X. P 46, 64 

Tischler, M 78 

Togo, Y 60, 94 

Toher, J. E 64 

Toll, M. W 65, 99 

Tonder, C. L 64 

Toth, Z. J 64 

Touhey, T. J 78 

Toulson, W. H 49, 78 

Townshend, W. H 60 



Tramer, A 68 

Trattner, R. E 73 

Traub, R 61 

Trimble, I. R 78 

Truitt, E. B., Jr 68, 102 

Tuerk, 1 73 

Underwood, B. A 54, 88 

Uyeda, C. K 51 

Valderas, J. G 64 

Van Bjsterveld 47 

Vance, A 68 

Van Lill. S. J., Ill 60 

Vidaver, R. M 47, 73 

Viega. M 105 

Villa Santa, U 64, 98 

Vochell. A. F 78 

Vollmer. F. J 90 

Von Nuehlen. L. H 73 

Voshell, A. F 49 

Voultepsis. E 64 

Wadsworth. G. E 51, 83 

Waghelstein. J 60 

Wagner. J. A 65, 99, 100 

Walker. S. H 68, 101 

Walker. W. W 51, 78, 83 

Wall. G. H 68 

Wall. L. A.. Jr 60 

Wallop. W. H 74, 107 

Ward. A. T.. Jr 78 

Waterman. R. S 73 

Weaver. K. H 47, 68, 101 

Weher. R 60 

Weeks. W. E 68 

Weinberg. T 65, 99 

Weiner. I. H 79 

Weintraub, W 47, 73, 105 

Weisman, M. N 73 

Weiss, H. R 79 

Wells. G. E., Jr 64 

Wells. G. J 68, 101 

Wells, J 46, 51, 83 

Wells, R 61 

Wenzlaff. E. F 79 

Weston, D. L 105 

White, E. L 68 

White, J. P.. Ill 79 

Wich, J. C 68 

Wiedman, A. K 79 

Wilder, E. M 64 

Wilder, M. J 79, 108, 109 

Wilfson, D., Jr 60 

Wilkins, J. R 64, 98 

Will, D. R 79 



Faculty Index 1 QH| 



Will, O. A 73, 105 

Williams, C. H 60 

Wilson, K 73 

Wilson, P. D 54 

Wise, S. P 73 

Wise, W. D 49, 79 

Wisseman, C. L., Jr 48, 49, 60, 

61, 90, 95 

Wiswell, J. G 46, 49, 60, 89, 93 

Wittier, R. G 61 

Wizenberg, M. J 74, 107 

Wolfel, D. A 47, 74, 107 

Womack, W. S 64 

Wood, A. H 79 

Wood, C 65, 99 

Woodward, C. L 60 

Woodward, T. E 48, 49, 54, 89 



Workman, J. B 60, 89, 93 

Workman, J. M 79 

Worsley, T. L., Jr 60 

Wright, C. E 68 

Wright, R. B 65, 99 

Yaffe, S. N 60 

Yeager, G. H 48, 49, 79, 108 

Yim, R. E 68 

Young, 1 74, 105 

Young, J 74 

Young, J. D 47, 49. 79, 94, 

108, 110 

Zachary, A. S 64 

Zarbin, G. L 68 

Zerzavy, F. M 64 

Zieve, P. D 60, 90 

Zinn, W. F 49, 79 






Subject Index 



A 

Administration Building 29 

Administration, members 44 

Admission requirements 7 

Advancement for graduation 11 

Alpha Omega Alpha — National 

Medical Society 27 

American Medical Association Loans 23 

Anatomy 83 

Anesthesiology 85 

Application, method of making .... 9 

Art as Applied to Medicine 85 

Arthritis 91 

Avon Scholarship 21 

B 

Baccalaureate degree 13 

Baltimore City Hospitals 39 

Balder Scholarship Award 20 

Biological Chemistry 85 

Biophysics 86 

Bressler Research Laboratory 29 

C 

Cardiology 91 

Clinical Pathology 92 

Combined Doctor of Philosophy- 
Doctor of Medicine program 13 

Commencement, attendance 28 

Curriculum, organization of 10 

D 

Davidge Hall 29 

Dermatology 92 

Diplomas, application form 28 

Dr. Wayne W. Babcock Prize 21 



Dr. A. Bradley Gaither 

Memorial Prize 20 

Dr. Leonard M. Hummel 

Memorial Award 20 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr., Prize. . 20 
Dr. Michael Vinceguerra 

Scholarship 22 

Dr. John B. Weaver Fellowships. ... 22 

E 

Endocrinology and Metabolism 93 

Endowment Fund 126 

Equipment, required 18 

Eye Research Foundation of 

Bethesda 40 

F 

Faculty Board 46 

Faculty, members 50 

Faculty Prize 20 

Fees, current 15 

Fees, non-payment of 16 

Fees, re-examination 16 

Fellowships, summer research 22 

Forensic Pathology 100 

G 

Grading system 11 

Graduate program 13 

Graduation, attendance at 12 

Health Professions Student 

Loan Program 23 

H 

Health Sciences Library 33 

Historical Sketch 41 



136 



Subject Index 1 ^T 



Honor Council 24 

Housing 27 

Howard Hall 29 

Hypertension and Renal Disease. ... 94 

Infectious Diseases 94 

Interfraternity Council 25 

Internal Medicine Prize 20 

International Medicine 88 

Internships and residencies 14 

K 

Kernan, James Lawrence, Hospital 
and Industrial School of Maryland 
for Crippled Children 39 

L 

Leave of absence 17 

Loan funds 22 

M 

Maryland General Hospital 40 

Matriculants 113 

Medical Alumni Association 125 

Medical Historical Society 25 

Medical Technology Building 29 

Mercy Hospital 37 

McCormick Scholarship 22 

Microbiology 95 

N 

Neurology 97 

Neuropathology 100 

Neurosurgery 109 

Non-resident, definition 7 

O 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 98 

Ophthalmology 98 

Orthopedic Surgery 109 

Otolaryngology 109 

P 

Pathology 99 

Pediatrics 101 

Pharmacology 102 

Physical Diagnosis 94 

Physical Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 105 

Physiology 103 

Postgraduate Courses Ill 

Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 104 



Prizes and Awards 20 

Professional School Senate 24 

Psychiatry 105 

Pulmonary Diseases 94 

R 

Radiology 107 

Registration fee 15 

Requirements for admission to 

advanced standing 9 

Requirements for admission to 

first year class 8 

Research training program in 

international medicine 14 

Resident, definition 7 

Rules, general faculty 10 

s 

Scholarships 20 

State board examinations, 

certification for 12 

Student Activities Committee 24 

Student Activities Fund 16 

Student American Medical 

Association 25 

Student Council 24 

Student Council Emergency 

Loan Fund 23 

Student Council Intramural 

Atlhetic Program 25 

Student Health Service 27 

Student organizations 24 

Surgery 108 

T 

Thoracic Surgery 110 

Tuition 15 

U 

Eduard Uhlenhuth Award 21 

University Hospital 33 

Urological Surgery 110 

W 

Warfield Freshman Merit 

Scholarship 21 

Withdrawal, academic standing on . 17 

Withdrawal, formal procedure 17 

Withdrawal, refund of fees on 17 

Woman's Auxiliary, Student 

American Medical Association 25 



Yearbook 25 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the Unr 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elki 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 






THE 



UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



BULLETIN 




School of Medicine 



1967-1969 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevo- 
cable contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The 
University reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at 
any time within the student's term of residence. The University further 
reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it con- 
siders such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



School of Medicine 

THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Medical School Calendar for 1967-1968 



1967 



August 21-25 

September 5 



September 



Re-examinations for advancement 

1st year orientation 

Registration and payment of fees, 

2nd and 3rd years 
1st year orientation 
Registration and payment of fees, 

1st and 2nd years 
3rd year orientation 



9 A.M. 



9 A.M. 



First semester begins September 7, 1967 and ends January 27, 1968 
September 7 Instruction begins for all classes 

November 22 Thanksgiving recess begins at 5 P.M. 

November 27 Instruction resumes for all classes 

December 23 Christmas recess begins at 5 P.M. 



1968 

January 
January 



2 Instruction resumes for all classes 

25 and 26 Registration and payment of fees 

for second semester— all classes 



9 A.M.* 



January 


27 


January 


29 


February 


22 


April 


11 



April 



13 



* ALL students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
fees on regular registration days. Those who do not complete their registration on the pre- 
scribed days will be charged a PENALTY FEE OF $20.00. The Office of the Registrar is in 
Howard Hall and the Office of the Comptroller is in the University; both offices are open 
Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. to 4:45 P.M. 

Last day of first semester 
Beginning of second semester 
Holiday— Washington's Birthday 
Easter recess begins at 5 P.M. for 3rd and 

4th years. 
Spring vacation begins at 12 noon for 

1st and 2nd years 
Instruction resumes for 3rd and 4th years 
Instruction resumes for 1st and 2nd years 
National Board Examinations, Part II** 
Classes cease for 4th year at 5 P.M. 
Holiday— Memorial Day 
Classes cease for 3rd year at 5 P.M. 
Classes cease for 1st and 2nd years at 12 noon 
Examinations for 3rd year 
Pre -commencement— Baltimore Campus 
Commencement Exercises— College Park Campus 
Examinations for 1st and 2nd years 
National Boards, Part I** 



April 


16 


April 


22 


April 


16 and 17 


May 


25 


May 


30 


May 


31 


June 


1 


June 


3 and 4 


June 


7 


June 


8 


June 


3-6 


June 


18 and 19 



National Board dates are TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 



Medical School Calendar for 1968-1969 



1968 

August 
September 



September 



18-22 Re-examinations for advancement 

3 1st year orientation 
Registration and payment of fees, 

2nd and 3rd years 

4 1st year orientation 
3rd year orientation 
Registration and payment of fees, 

1st and 4th years 



9 AM 



9 A.M. 



First semester begins September 5, J 968 and ends January 25, 1968 
Instruction begins for all classes September 5 
November 21 Thanksgiving recess begins at 5 P.M. 

November 25 Instruction resumes for all classes 

December 23 Christmas recess begins at 5 P.M. 



1969 

January 2 

January 23 and 24 



January 



25 



Instruction resumes for all classes 
Registration and payment of fees 
for second semester— all classes 
Last day of first semester 



9 A.M. 



* ALL students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
fees on regular registration days. Those who do not complete their registration on the 
prescribed days will be charged a PENALTY FEE OF $20.00. The Office of the Registrar 
is in Howard Hall and the Office of the Comptroller is in the University; both offices are 
open Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. to 4:45 P.M. 



Second semester begins January 27, 1969 
Beginning of second semester 
Holiday— Washington's Birthday 
Easter recess begins for 3rd and 4th years at 5 P.M. 
Spring vacation begins at 5 P.M. for 1st and 2nd years 
Instructions resumes for 3rd and 4th years 
National Boards, Part II** 
Construction resumes for 1st and 2nd years 
Classes cease for 4th year at 12 noon 
Classes cease for 1st and 2nd years at 12 noon 
Holiday— Memorial Day 
Classes cease for 3rd year at 12 noon 
Examinations for 3rd year 
Precommencement— Baltimore Campus 
Commencement Exercises— College Park Campus 
Examinations for 1st and 2nd years 
National Boards, Part I** 



National Board dates are TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 

3 



January 


27 


February 


22 


April 


3 


April 


11-19 


April 


8 


April 


15 and 16 


April 


20 


May 


24 


May 


29 


May 


30 


May 


31 


June 


2 and 3 


June 


7 


June 


8 


June 


2-5 


June 


17 and 18 






MAY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



Jl M 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



JULY 
S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 



\1 GUST 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 

DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



00 
0> 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 

JUNE 

5 M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 

OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



MARCH 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

JULY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



APRIL 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 

AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

DECEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



10 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

JULY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



APRIL 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 2 

1967-1969 Calendar 4 

Aerial View of Campus 6 

Requirements for Admission and Application 8 

Instructions Leading to Degree of Doctor of Medicine 11 

Additional Educational Programs 15 

Tuition, Fees, and Registration 17 

Required Equipment 19 

Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds 20 

General Information 24 

Buildings and Facilities 29 

Affiliated Institutions 37 

Historical Sketch 40 

Administration 43 

Faculty Boards and Committees 45 

Faculty 49 

Organization of Curriculum and Courses of Instruction 79 

Continuing Education Courses 108 

Matriculants 109 

Geographical Distribution of Matriculants 119 

Alumni Association 120 

Endowment Fund 121 

Faculty Index 123 

Subject Index 133 

5 



PACA STREET 



J 1 

o> , 
o ' 

^ 1 

■O C 

n 


P"^ 








3 C 





Requirements For Admission 

Policy on Admissions 

Academic achievement, medical aptitude test scores, recommendations from 
college instructors or premedical committee, and personal interview are all care- 
fully considered in evaluating an applicant. A student may be denied admission 
because of unsatisfactory reports in any one of these areas. Academic achieve- 
ment alone does not automatically insure acceptance as the Committee is equally 
concerned with personality, aptitude, character, integrity, motivation, and assess- 
ment of the individual as a potential physician. A letter of recommendation is 
required from the premedical committee. If there is no premedical committee, 
letters are requested from two science and one non-science course instructors. 
Letters from other sources are not encouraged. Candidates will be expected to 
complete all required premedical courses before June 15 of the year they are 
to matriculate. With permission of the Committee on Admissions, this require- 
ment at times may be waived under certain circumstances. All courses must be 
completed prior to registration in the School of Medicine in September. 

Matriculants are required to accept the provisions of the Honor Code and to 
agree to assume its obligations prior to registration. A copy of the Honor Code 
and agreement form is sent to each candidate with notice of acceptance. 

Although preference will be given to Maryland residents, applications from 
well qualified students from other areas of the United States and Canada are 
welcome. Because of the many applicants for the number of places available, 
applicants can be considered only if they are citizens of the United States or 
Canada. Applicants from foreign schools must complete at least two years of 
premedical work in an approved college or university in the United States or 
Canada. 

Definition of Resident and Non-Resident 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the time 
of their registration, their parents have been domiciled in this State for at least 
six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of the 
State by maintaining such residence for at least six months. 

However, the right of the minor to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if, at the time of their registra- 
tion, they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the Armed Forces while 
stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six month period 
referred to above, except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 

8 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION • 9 

Maryland for at least one year prior to his entrance into the Armed Services 
and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

Requirements for Admission to First Year Class 

Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses particu- 
larly in the natural sciences. Except under unusual circumstances the student 
should plan a four year curriculum with a suitable Arts and Science major, 
leading to a bachelor's degree. A major in an area other than science is quite 
acceptable although it is not intended to divert students from a science major if 
this is their field of choice. The student taking science courses beyond the minimal 
requirements is encouraged to take such subjects as embryology, comparative 
anatomy, psychology, anthropology, physical chemistry, or cellular physiology. 
Courses duplicating medical school work, such as histology, neurology, bio- 
chemistry, mammalian physiology, human anatomy, and bacteriology are not 
recommended unless they are required in the student's major sequence. Having 
credit in such courses will not excuse students from taking them in medical school. 
In the non-science area courses in English, philosophy, sociology, economics, 
history, and government and politics are recommended. Mathematics through 
calculus is also recommended. 

Applicants who choose a non-science major should take a sequence of science 
courses which demonstrates their academic ability to capably handle the demands 
made by these courses. 

A minimum of 90 semester hours (three academic years) of acceptable college 
credit are required exclusive of physical education and military science, earned 
in colleges of arts and sciences whose names occur on the current list of "Ac- 
credited Institutions of Higher Education" as compiled by the National Commit- 
tee of Regional Accrediting Agencies of the United States. Applicants who will 
have earned a bachelor's degree in arts and sciences before registration for 
medical school from an approved college or university will be given preference 
over applicants who have not completed the requirements for the bachelor's 
degree. Only those courses will be acceptable which are approved for credit 
towards an A.B. or B.S. degree by the university or college attended as well as 
the University of Maryland. 

The following college courses and credits at an acceptable level are required 
before registering for Medical School. 

Semester 

Hours 
General biology or zoology 8 

Inorganic chemistry 8 

Organic chemistry 6 

General physics 8 

English 12 

Foreign language 6 

No more than 60 hours will be accepted from accredited Junior Colleges and 
then only if these credits are validated by a college offering a Bachelor of Arts 
or Science Degree. 



10 • Requirements for Admission 

Applicants over the age of 26 cannot be encouraged to apply. 

An evaluation of the applicant's credentials is made by members of the Com- 
mittee of Admissions to determine if an interview is to be requested. This deci- 
sion is based upon a composite estimate of the applicant's ability and future 
promise in the field of medicine as measured by his academic record to date, 
performance in the Medical College Admissions Test, recommendations of the 
premedical faculty, extracurricular activities, and the applicant's overall standing 
as compared with that of the other applicants applying that year. Such interviews 
must be scheduled in advance at the initiative of the Committee. 

Medical College Admission Tests should be taken in May and must be taken 
no later than October of the year preceding the year of entrance. Applicants 
should write the Psychological Testing Corporation, 304 East 45th Street, New 
York, New York 10017, for further information and for registration forms. 

Requirements for Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students who have attended approved medical schools are eligible to file ap- 
plications for admission to the second and third year classes only. These appli- 
cants must meet the current first year entrance requirements in addition to pre- 
senting acceptable medical school credentials, and a medical school record based 
on courses which are equivalent to similar courses in this school. 

Application for advanced standing must be made no later than April 15 of 
the year of desired admission. 

No student will be considered who has been dismissed from any medical 
school unless his former Dean submits a letter addressed to the Committee on 
Admissions stating the student is reinstated in good standing and eligible for 
promotion. 

No student will be considered who is not eligible for promotion at time of 
transfer. 

Applicants for admission to third year class are required to complete satis- 
factorily the National Board Examination, Part I, before registration. 

Persons who already hold the degree of Doctor of Medicine will not be ad- 
mitted to the Medical School as a candidate for that degree from this University. 

No applicants from foreign medical schools will be considered for advanced 
standing. 

Application for admission to advanced standing is made in accordance with 
instructions accompanying the application form. 

Method of Making Application 

Requests for application forms should be sent to The Committee on Admissions, 
School of Medicine, 522 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Application for admission to the first year class entering in September must 
be filed between July 1 and December 31 of the year prior to desired admission. 
Requests for application forms should be made after June 15. 

It is in the best interests of the applicant to file his application and the sup- 
porting credentials early in the application period. 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to see that all required credentials and 
the completed application packet are filed with and received by the Committee on 
Admissions. This especially applies to the letter of recommendation from the 
premedical committee, transcripts from all institutions attended (sent directly 



Organization of Curriculum • 1 1 
from that institution to the Committee), and the scores on the Medical College 



Admissions Test. 



Orientation for New Students 

All new students, whether they are admitted to the first year class or with 
advanced standing, are expected to attend Orientation for New Students. 



Instruction Leading to Degree of 
Doctor of Medicine 

Organization of Curriculum 

The curriculum is organized to permit students to acquire fundamental knowl- 
edge of the principles of medicine, establish habits of applying critical evaluation 
and judgment to problems of health and disease, and develop ethical principles 
which inspire trust in their patients and respect of the community. 

Instruction encompasses four academic years. The first and second years are 
largely devoted to the study of the basic medical sciences. In the first year, 
physiology, biochemistry, and biophysics are given as one correlated course, i.e., 
Introduction to Basic Medical Sciences and this is closely correlated with anatomy. 
After introductory laboratory experience, the students work in small groups on 
projects in any of the basic medical science departments. Each subject relates 
to the concept that basic knowledge has its clinical application. The student 
is guided in the acquisition of detail which he acquires by himself. A closely 
knit interdepartmental approach to the curriculum is being developed in order to 
enable the student to use the techniques and knowledge of basic science for the 
better understanding and more rational scientific approach to the clinical manage- 
ment of human illness. Student research is encouraged during the summer recesses 
and during the elective times in the curriculum. In most courses, the final examina- 
tion as the sole test of achievement has disappeared, and the student's final 
grade is determined by examinations, seminars, conferences, and assigned work 
carried on throughout the course. Where applicable, teaching is done under 
the direction of a faculty committee from several departments. This method 
of teaching provides better correlation and coordination of the subject matter 
with more thorough coverage of the principles involved. The student is expected 
to conduct himself or herself as a graduate student and to devote free time to 
areas of his or her special interests. 

General Faculty Rules 

The University authorities reserve the right to make changes in the curriculum, 
the requirements for advancement and graduation, fees, and in rules and regula- 
tions whenever expedient. 



12 • Grading System 

The School of Medicine does not accept responsibility for students' personal 
property. 

Students who report for classes later than one week after scheduled time will 
be permitted to begin work only by permission of the Dean. 

Attendance at all scheduled classes is expected. 

Notice of change of address should be submitted promptly to the Dean's Office 
and to the Registrar's Office. 

Grading System 

Official grades are designated by these symbols: 
"3", "2", and "1"— in rank from highest to lowest 
P— satisfactory completion of course 
F— failure 
I— incomplete 
C— condition 
Students will receive a grade for the various disciplines in the manner outlined 
below: 

Anatomy 

Biochemistry 

Physiology 

Microbiology 

Pharmacology 

Pathology > 3, 2, 1, F, I, C 

Psychiatry 

Surgery 

Medicine 

Pediatrics 

Ob-Gyn 

Neurology \ 

Radiology / 

Ophthalmology P, F, I, C 

Anesthesiology \ 

Preventive Medicine / 

Advancement and Graduation 

At the end of each academic year the Advancement Committee convenes to 
review the records of all students in each class. The estimate of a student's standing 
is based on academic achievement, his moral and ethical traits, and general 
evaluation of his fitness for a career in medicine. The committee recommends 
appropriate action to the Faculty Board. 

1. All students will be required to take the comprehensive National Board 
Examinations, Parts I and II. and they will be expected to pass the examinations 
to be advanced from the second to the third year or to graduate, respectively. 

2. Students in all courses in which National Board Examinations are given will 
receive provisional grades of "3", "2", "1", Condition (C), or Failure (F). Only 
those students who have "3", "2", or "1" on the first year courses and no "F's" 
in the second year courses will be eligible to take the National Board Examina- 
tion, Part I. Only those students who have passed Part I, receive "3", "2", or 
"1" in the third year courses and no "F's" in the fourth year courses will be 
eligible to take the National Board Examination, Part II. 



State Board Examinations • 13 

3. Students with "C's" in the second and fourth year courses may, at the 
discretion of the department head, remove the "C" by re-examination or by 
passing the National Board Examination in the subject in which they are deficient. 

4. Students with a "C" in any first or third year course must remove the "C" 
by re-examination before being eligible for promotion to the second or fourth 
year. 

5. Final grades will be assigned in those courses for which National Board 
Examinations are given only when the National Board Examinations are passed 
and will be 3, 2, 1. 

6. Students who fail the National Board Examinations by National Board 
standards will receive a "C" in those subjects in which the score is lower than 75. 

7. A rating of "C" obtained as a result of failing the National Board Examina- 
tions must be removed prior to advancement from one year to the next or gradua- 
tion by re-examination in the conditioned subject. 

8. No student will be advanced on probation. 

9. Students who fail re-examinations will be given an "F" and any student 
receiving more than one "F" in a major course in any one year will be dismissed 
from the school. 

Students with one failure or one failure plus one or more conditions, at the 
discretion of the Advancement Committee, may be allowed to remove the "F" 
by repetition of the course, the semester, the entire year at Maryland or the 
course at any school satisfactory to the department head, or may be dismissed. 

Students who repeat a year and do not satisfactorily pass all courses with a 
better than minimum rating may, at the discretion of the Advancement Com- 
mittee, be dismissed. 

10. When circumstances beyond the student's control make it impossible for 
him to complete a course at the usual time, he will be given an Incomplete (I) 
until such time as he has completed the course. An "I" is in no way prejudicial 
to the final rating or grade of the student in the course, but must be removed 
prior to promotion to the next year. 

11. The faculty reserves the right to determine if a student may withdraw, re- 
peat, advance, or graduate on academic or moral and personal grounds, in- 
cluding traits of character. 

12. All discretionary actions of the Advancement Committee are subject to 
ratification by the Faculty Board and must be presented to them at their next 
meeting. 

Certification for State Board Examinations 

Students at the end of their second and fourth years will be certified to the 
State Board Examiners if they have successfully completed the requirements for 
promotion to the third year or for graduation. 

Attendance at Graduation 

All students are required to attend graduation. Permission to receive the degree 
in absentia must be obtained in advance from the Dean. 








n 




Additional Educational Programs 

Baccalaureate Degree 

Selected students entering the School of Medicine from colleges which usually 
grant a baccalaureate degree after the successful completion of the first year 
of medicine, are responsible for: a) providing a certificate from his college or 
university that he is eligible for this degree, and b) meeting all requirements of 
the School of Medicine for advancement to the second year. 

Graduate Program 

Graduate courses and research opportunities leading to advanced degrees are 
available in most of the basic science departments of the School of Medicine. 
Students pursuing graduate work must register in the Graduate School of the 
University of Maryland and meet the same requirements as other graduate stu- 
dents. Detailed information concerning fees, scholarships, and other material 
of general nature, may be found in the University publication titled An Adventure 
in Learning. This may be obtained from the Office of University Relations, 
North Administration Building. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Combined Doctor of Philosophy- 
Doctor of Medicine Program 

Properly qualified medical students may elect to enter the combined educa- 
tional program leading to Doctor of Medicine and a graduate degree. Such stu- 
dents may arrange a leave of absence of up to three years at the end of their 
second or third year in medical school to become candidates for either M.S. or 
Ph.D. in one of the basic medical sciences. Before entering the combined pro- 
gram, students must meet the requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School and be acceptable to the department of their choice as a candidate for 
an advanced degree. 

Internships and Residencies 

University Hospital offers the following graduate specialty training programs for 
interns and residents. These programs are approved by the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association. 

University Hospital participates in the National Intern Matching Program to 
fill its 30 approved intern positions. The program includes straight intern- 
ships in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and pathology. 

Approved residency programs are offered in the following specialty areas: 
Department of Medicine: Internal Medicine, Dermatology 
Department of Surgery: General Surgery, Neurological Surgery, Orthopedic 
Surgery, Thoracic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Urology 

15 



16 • Internships and Residencies 

Department of Pediatries: Pediatrics 

Department of Psychiatry: Psychiatry. Child Psychiatry 

Department of Anesthesiology: Anesthesiology 

Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology: Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Department of Pathology: Pathology 

Department of Radiology: Radiology 

Department of Neurology: Neurology 

Department of Preventive Medicine: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Department of Ophthalmology: Ophthalmology 
In total, approximately 225 resident positions are offered. 

Appointments to intern and resident positions are made by the Director of 
the Hospital upon the recommendations of the House Staff Committee of the 
Medical Board or. in the case of residents, upon the recommendations of the 
appropriate Clinical Department Head. Correspondence and applications should 
be addressed to: 



THE DIRECTOR 

University Hospital 
Redwood and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Additional Educational Programs 

Research training in international health is accomplished through the mechanism 
of a Research Associate program under the Institute of International Medicine. 
This program provides for post-doctoral training in research on a broad spectrum 
of health problems of developing nations. 



Tuition, Fees and Registration 

Current Fees 

Application Fee $ 7.50 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) 10.00 

Tuition-Resident of Maryland 650.00 

Tuition-Non-Residents 950.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Student Activities Fee 23.50 

Student Health Fee 10.00 

♦Student Union Fee 30.00 

**Special Fee 10.00 

National Board Examination Fee 

Second year students 10.00 

Fourth year students 15.00 

***Hospital Insurance (Blue Cross) 

Individual Plan 54.24 

Family Plan 125.28 

The application fee should be submitted with the formal application to medical 
school. A matriculation fee of $10 and a deposit on tuition of $50 is required of 
all applicants before the expiration date specified in the offer of acceptance. The 
deposit on tuition will be credited against first semester charges. In the event 
of withdrawal before registration the matriculation fee will be retained, and the 
advanced deposit will be returned on request, if requested before February I. 

Registration 

For the fall semester, all students, after proper certification, are requested to 
complete a set of registration cards to be obtained from the Office of the 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. All students are expected to complete their 
registration, including the payment of bills on the registration days. Those who 
do not complete their registration on the prescribed days will be charged a fee 
of $20.00. 



*The Student Union Fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional Schools 
on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost of construc- 
tion of the Union Building. 

**The Special Fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools 
on the Baltimore Campus and is used to finance equipment for the Union Building. 

***Membership of the student in Blue Cross or any other acceptable hospital insurance 
is required. Each student must produce certified proof of such membership at the time of 
registration. Rates are subject to change. 

One-half of the tuition fee and all of the following— the laboratory fee, the 
student health fee, the student union fee, the National Board Examination fee, 
the special fee, and the student activities fee are payable on the date specified 

17 



18 • Fees and Funds 

for registration for the first semester. Blue Cross Hospitalization for six months 
in advance is paid at the beginning of each semester. 

The remainder of the tuition fee shall be paid on the date designated for the 
payment of fees for the second semester. Fourth year students shall pay the 
graduation fee, in addition, at this time. 

Non-payment of Fees 

If semester fees are not paid in full on the specified registration dates, a penalty 
of $20.00 will be added. 

If a satisfactory settlement or an agreement for settlement is not fnade with 
the business office within ten days after a payment is due, the student automatically 
is debarred from attendance at classes and will forfeit the other privileges of the 
School of Medicine. 



Re-examination Fee 

A student who is eligible for re-examinations must secure a bill in the amount 
of $5.00 from the Registrar's Office, make payment to the Cashier for each 
subject in which he is to be examined, and present the receipt to the faculty 
member giving the examination before he will be permitted to take the examination. 

Student Activities Fund 

This fund supports all student activities and is budgeted by the Student Council 
in accordance with its own by-laws. All expenditures from this fund must be 
approved by the Student Council. The fund supports the student recreational 
and social program, representation at national conventions for certain student 
organizations, the cost of registration in the National Internship Matching Pro- 
gram as well as other activities. A portion of the fund is allocated to the year- 
book and provides each medical student with a copy of this publication. On 
registration all students are given a copy of The Student Handbook containing 
The Honor Code and The By-Laws of the Honor Council together with the 
By-Laws of the Student Council. 

Withdrawals and Refunds 

Students desiring to leave the School of Medicine at any time during the 
academic year are required to file with the Dean a letter of resignation. The 
student must satisfy the authorities that he has no outstanding obligations to the 
school and must return his Student Identity Card and Matriculation Card. 

If these procedures are not completed, the student will not be entitled to 
honorable dismissal nor to refund of fees. 

Students under 21 years of age must supplement the procedures previously 
described with the written consent of their parents or guardians. 

ACADEMIC STANDING ON WITHDRAWAL 

Students who voluntarily withdraw during an academic semester will be given 
no credit. 

Students are not permitted to resort to withdrawal in order to preclude current 



Required Equipment • 19 

or impending failures. Their standing on withdrawal will be recorded in the 
Registrar's Office. 

Students who withdraw from the School of Medicine, and later desire read- 
mission, must apply to the Committee on Admissions, unless other arrangements 
have been consumated with the Dean's written consent. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

Students who are eligible to honorable dismissal will receive a refund of cur- 
rent charges, after the matriculation fee has been deducted, according to the 
following schedule: 

PERIODS ELAPSED AFTER INSTRUCTION BEGINS 

PERCENTAGE 
REFUNDABLE 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

After five weeks 

Leave of Absence 

Students who are in good standing may be granted one year's leave of absence 
on request to the Dean. Longer leaves can be arranged only under special cir- 
cumstances except those students in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. program. 



Required Equipment 



At the beginning of the first year, all freshmen must possess a complete set 
of dissecting instruments similar to the one on display in the bookstore. In ad- 
dition, they must provide themselves with microscopes equipped with a mechani- 
cal stage and a substage lamp. Microscopes must meet the standards described below. 

A standard monocular or binocular microscope made by Bausch & Lomb, 
Leitz, Zeiss, Reichert, or American Optical Company fitted with the following 
attachments, meets the requirements: 

16 mm.. lOx, 0.25 N.A.— 4.9 mm. working distance. 
4 mm.. 43x, 0.65 N.A.— 0.6 mm. working distance. 
1.8 mm., 97x, oil immersion. 1.25 N.A,— 0. 13 mm. working distance. 
Oculars: lOx and 5x. Huygenian eyepieces. 
A scanning objective is optional, but often proves to be of great value. 

The microscope should also be equipped with a wide aperture stage with 
detachable ungraduated mechanical stage, a substage condenser, variable focusing 



20 • Prizes, Scholarships, etc. 

type 1.25 N.A. with iris diaphragm (a rack and pinion focusing device is pre- 
ferred), and a mirror which is plane on one side, and concave on the other. 
A carrying case is recommended. 

Students are cautioned with respect to the purchase of used or odd-lot 
microscopes since some of the older instruments are in poor optical or mechanical 
condition, and. in addition, some are equipped with a 4 mm. (high dry) ob- 
jective whose N.A. is marked as 0.85. This objective has such a short working 
distance (0.3 mm.) that it is difficult or impossible to focus through thick cover 
glasses or the standard hemocytometer cover glass without breakage. 

All microscopes will be checked during the first scheduled laboratory in 
Microscopic Anatomy. 

Other instruments and equipment may be needed. The student will be in- 
formed of these needs by the department involved at an appropriate time. 

Students in the second year class are also expected to provide themselves with 
short white lapel coats. Three button, 8-ounce sanforized duck coats are satisfactory. 



Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, Loan 
Funds, and Student Employment 



Prizes 



THE FACULTY PRIZE 



The Faculty will award the Faculty Gold Medal and Certificate and five or 
more Certificates of Honor to those highest ranking candidates for graduation 
who, during the four academic years, have exhibited outstanding qualifications 
for the practice of medicine. 



THE BALDER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 



Each year a prize of $500 will be awarded for outstanding academic achieve- 
ment to a graduating senior. 



THE DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 



A prize of $25, given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a memorial to the 
late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, is awarded to the student in the fourth year class 
doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 



THE DR. LEONARD M. HUMMEL MEMORIAL AWARD 



A gold medal and Certificate of Proficiency will be awarded annually as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Leonard M. Hummel to the graduate selected by the 
Executive Committee of the Faculty who has manifested outstanding qualifications 
in Internal Medicine. 



Scholarships • 21 



THE DR. HARRY M. ROBINSON, SR., PRIZE 



A prize of $25 is given each year in honor of Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr., late 
Professor Emeritus of Dermatology, to the member of the fourth year class 
selected by the Faculty who has done outstanding work in Dermatology. 



THE DR. JACOB E. FINESINGER PRIZb 



A prize of $100 is given each year in honor of Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, late 
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry, to the member of the 
fourth year class selected by the Faculty who has done outstanding work in 
Psychiatry. 



THE DR. MILTON S. SACKS MEMORIAL AWARD 



A prize of $100 is given each year in honor of Dr. Milton S. Sacks, late Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Hematology, to the member of the fourth year class 
selected by the Faculty who has performed with special excellence in Medicine 
and Hematology. 

THE DR. WAYNE W. BABCOCK PRIZE 

Each year a prize of $50 will be awarded to a graduating senior for outstanding 
work in Surgery as a memorial to Dr. Wayne W. Babcock. 

THE CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL CONFERENCE AWARD 

The junior or senior student who has performed most ably throughout the 
academic year in the diagnosis of clinical pathological conference cases will re- 
ceive an award of $50 and will have his name appropriately inscribed on a 
plaque in Gordon Wilson Hall. 

Financial A id 

The supervision of financial aid for medical students rests with the Assistant 
Dean of Student Affairs, 103 Davidge Hall. In general, all University scholar- 
ships and most Federal scholarships and loans are awarded on an annual basis 
in July prior to the academic year. Relevant applications must be complete by 
June 1. A far smaller number of Federal scholarships, Federal loans, and Uni- 
versity loans are awarded in October and in January. 

Scholarships 

All Classes 

federal health professions scholarship program 

Members of the classes of 1970-1973 may apply for Federal Scholarships, awarded 
on the basis of need alone to "members of low income families who could not 
otherwise continue their medical studies." Those students eligible for such 
scholarships may anticipate a total educational indebtedness at the end of Medi- 
cal School not in excess of $5000. Such scholarships, which are renewable after 
annual reassessment of both needs and resources, may be as high as $2500 per 
year. No Federal Scholarships will be awarded to students who do not also simul- 
taneously request and receive a Federal Health Professions' Loan. 



22 • Scholarships 

state scholarships for general practice 

The State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland, 
offers 10 scholarships each year in the amount of $1500 per year. Such awards, 
which are renewable annually, may be made to needy students anticipating or 
having a bachelor's degree in the year of the award. The students must have 
been residents of Maryland for five years prior to the time of application. The 
awards, based on need and academic merit, will be given to students only if 
they sign a bond to "engage in the general practice of medicine for no less than 
three years in an area of need in the State of Maryland so designated by the 
State Health Department. ..." Applications for these awards should be made 
directly to the State Scholarship Board; they must be submitted by April 1 prior 
to the relevant academic year. 

For Freshmen Only 

avalon scholarship 

An Avalon Scholarship, with a stipend of $650, will be awarded to the mem- 
ber of the incoming freshman class who shows the greatest promise for a suc- 
cessful career in medicine. All accepted students are eligible whether resident 
or non-resident. Formal application is not necessary in that all admitted stu- 
dents are automatically considered. At the end of each academic year, the re- 
cipient's record will be reviewed by the Committee on Scholarships and Loans 
and the scholarship extended for another year if the record warrants. Any 
recipient who does not stand at least in the upper third of the class may not be 
considered eligible for renewal. If an applicant is awarded an Avalon Scholar- 
ship, it is understood that during its tenure he will accept no outside remunera- 
tive employment during the school year without approval of the Office of the 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. 

WARFIELD FRESHMAN MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 

Five scholarships, each with a stipend of $650, are available to members of 
the first year class who are residents of Maryland and who have demonstrated 
outstanding potentiality for the study of medicine. Selection will be based on the 
applicant's college record, Medical College Admission Test scores, and any other 
criteria available to the Committee on Admissions, including its impression of 
the applicant at the time he was interviewed. Formal application should be made 
directly to the Committee on Admissions. The Committee reserves the right to 
withhold scholarship awards if, in its opinion, there are no qualified applicants 
in any particular year. These scholarships are available to first year students 
only, and therefore are not renewable. Recipients may apply in later years for 
Medical School Scholarships open to upperclassmen. 

For Upperclassmen Only 

university scholarships 

Over 40 University Scholarships are available to members of the three upper- 
classes with stipends ranging from $250 to $1000 a year, with an average of 
about $500. More than half of these scholarships are derived from the kind 
bequest of the estate of Dr. Michael Vinceguerra. All scholarships are awarded 
for one academic year and will be renewed only on application. Awards are made 



Loans and Fellowships • 23 

on a competitive basis with both academic proficiency and need as major con- 
siderations. Students who do not qualify for scholarships may apply for student 
loans. 



Loans 

FEDERAL HEALLH PROFESSIONS' STUDENL LOAN PROGRAM 

Significant financial assistance is available to all students in need from the 
Federal Health Professions Student Loan Program. Loans up to $2500 per year 
are repayable over a 10-year period, beginning three years after graduation. No 
interest is charged on the loans until the beginning of the repayment period, 
when interest will be charged at the current federal rate which is at present 4.6%. 

UNIVERSITY LOANS 

Loans from a number of funds under direct Medical School control are avail- 
able to medical students who are in financial need. Application may be made 
at any time, although most applications are made and considered shortly before 
the beginning of the second semester. Except in unusual circumstances, loans 
from Medical School funds are limited to $400 a year. Such loans are awarded 
on the basis of need. Most loans are to be repaid in five equal installments with 
the first payment on the loan being due at the end of the fifth year following 
graduation. At that time simple interest of 3% begins to accrue. 

AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION LOANS 

The American Medical Association will guarantee loans up to $750 per year 
to medical students with interest at 1% above the Chicago prime rate. Repay- 
ment must begin on the first day of the fifth month after completing training 
including Internship and Residency. Thereafter, there will be an additional 1% 
interest charged on the unpaid balance. 

STUDENT COUNCIL EMERGENCY LOAN FUND 

The Student Council of the Medical School has established an Emergency 
Loan Fund for all medical students. When funds are available, loans are without 
interest, are limited to $400, and must be repaid within 120 days. 

Fellowships 

STUDENT RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS 

Over 100 Student Summer Research Fellowships are available annually upon 
application to the Committee on Scholarships and Loans or to the individual 
departments of the School of Medicine. A very limited number of student research 
fellowships are awarded for work during the academic year by selected departments. 

THE DR. JOHN B. WEAVER FELLOWSHIPS 

The Will of Dr. John B. Weaver, who died in 1929, authorized the Trustees 
of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland to establish fellowships 
in his name. Two such fellowships, each in the amount of $1500, will be awarded 
annually to applicants who as physicians are full time fellows in research or 
teaching in the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 



24 • General Information 

Student Employment 

Students engaging in outside work during the academic year must report such 
activities to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at the beginning of the School 
year or at anytime during the school year that such work is undertaken. This 
regulation pertains to all students entering the School of Medicine in September, 
1965, and thereafter. Students of any class designated by an appropriate Advance- 
ment Committee to be in academic difficulty will not engage in part time em- 
ployment without the approval of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. Stu- 
dents considering outside employment in a clinical setting are encouraged to 
review carefully the opinion of the Law Department of the American Medical 
Association entitled "Employment of Medical Students as Externs." 






General Information 

Organizations 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

This Committee serves to coordinate and integrate the activities of all student 
groups and to act as liaison between the student body, the administration, and 
the faculty. Members are: President of the Student Council, Class Presidents, 
Chairman of the Honor Council, President of the Student American Medical 
Association, President of the Interfraternity Council, President of Alpha Omega 
Alpha, President of the Women's Auxiliary to Student American Medical 
Association, Editor of the Yearbook, Editor of the SAMA Newspaper, President 
of Christian Medical Society, and the Athletic Director of the Medical Student 
Council, Assistant Deans and those faculty members appointed by Faculty Board. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

Each year the student body elects the Student Council which formulates and 
directs policies and activities of the student body and makes appropriate recom- 
mendations to the proper authorities. It is also responsible for disbursement of 
the Student Activities Fund, arranges the social program for the year, maintains 
liaison with the Student Union Board, and organizes the Medical Historical 
Society. 

HONOR COUNCIL 

The Honor Council, elected by the Student Body, is responsible for the inter- 
pretation and execution of the Honor Code. Acceptance of the provisions and 
obligations of this Code is required of all students entering the Medical School. 

BALTIMORE STUDENT UNION BOARD 

The Board is a representative body of those students who live in the Student 
Union. The Medical Student Council maintains liaison with the Board. 



General Information • 25 



STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 



All medical students are eligible to join the chapter of Student American 
Medical Association at Maryland. This organization is designed to prepare the 
future physician for full participation in organized medicine. Furthermore, the 
active chapter is responsible for student liaison with high school and college 
groups, for publication of the bi-monthly SAMA Newspaper, and for the or- 
ganization of an annual Regional Research Seminar involving the SAMA chap- 
ters in the Middle Atlantic area. The SAMA Newspaper covers Medical School 
news including the latest developments in areas of concern to medical students 
and faculty. 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Women's Auxiliary helps wives of medical students prepare themselves 
for their future responsibilities as wives of physicians. It has promoted closer 
association among the student wives, both with each other and with wives of 
faculty members and practicing physicians. The Auxiliary actively participates in 
many functions for the betterment of the Medical School. 

STUDENT COUNCIL INTRAMURAL ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

Each year the Student Council sponsors an intramural athletic program which 
consists of competition, generally interclass, in touch football, basketball, Softball, 
and tennis. Furthermore, a faculty-student softball game is a feature of the an- 
nual Medical Student Council Spring Picnic. 

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The purpose of the Council is to further the interests and improve the co- 
ordination and cooperation of the member groups. Each fraternity is represented 
by its President and Social Chairman. One of these representatives is chosen Presi- 
dent for the school year on a rotating basis. 

The Interfraternity Council organizes the Freshmen Orientation Program, 
operates a used Book and Microscope Store, and sponsors a yearly lectureship. 

THE YEARBOOK 

The Yearbook, Terra Mariae Medians, which covers all the facets of student 
activities, is compiled by the students. Originating as Bones, Molars, and Briefs, 
the Yearbook has provided a continuous record of graduating classes as far 
back as 1896. It is the outstanding record of student life. The cost of the Yearbook 
is included in the Student Activities Fee; hence, all medical students are en- 
titled to receive a copy annually without further charge. 

Medical Historical Society 

The Society is open to all interested medical students, house staff, and faculty. 
Meetings are held during the year at which members or guest lecturers present 
papers in selected areas of medical history. 

Alpha Omega Alpha: National Honorary Medical Society 

The Beta chapter of Maryland was established at the University o\~ Maryland 
in 1949. Medical students possessing outstanding qualities of moral integrity, 
scholarship, and leadership are elected to membership in their third or fourth 






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General Information • 27 

years. The Society sponsors an annual lectureship, a forum for the presenta- 
tion of medical student research, and chapter meetings on topics of social, educa- 
tional, and philosophical interest to medical students and faculty. 



Student Health Service 

James R. Karns, m.d Director, Student Health Service 

The Medical School has made provision for the systemic care of undergradu- 
ate medical students according to the following plan: 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 

All new students will be examined during the first week of the semester. Notice 
of the date, time, and place of the examination will be announced to the classes 
and posted on the bulletin board. The passing of this physical examination is 
necessary before final acceptance of any student. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

Students in need of medical attention will be seen by the Director, Dr. James 
R. Karns, in his office on the second floor. Outpatient Department at 12 p.m. 
daily, except Saturday and Sunday. In case of necessity, students will be seen 
at their homes. 

HOSPITALIZATION 

All students are required to have Blue Cross hospitalization insurance, or its 
equivalent. 

PHYSICAL DEFECTS 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects corrected 
before entering school in order to prevent loss of time which later correction 
might incur. 

LIMITATIONS 

It is not the function of this service to treat chronic conditions contracted by 
the students before admission, nor to extend treatment of acute conditions aris- 
ing in the period between academic years, unless the school physician recom- 
mends this service. 



Housing 

The Baltimore Union Building for students of the Professional Schools is lo- 
cated adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Ac- 
commodations for 195 men are provided in a five-story, semi-air conditioned 
building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry 
facilities, game room, bookstore, tobacco shop, and barber shop; there are lounges 
on each floor. Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made for 
rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for 
accommodations covers the academic year. The rates are: 



$160.00 per semester per double room. 

80.00 per eight weeks summer session per double room. 



28 • General Information 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: Room fur- 
nishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, bookshelves, desk, 
medicine cabinet, desk chair, and desk lamp. Maid service will include cleaning 
of room twice per week and replacement of change of linen once each week. 
Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone 
Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. Information 
can be obtained from the Director's Office. Mail service is also provided. Towels 
and linens must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 
Residents may either provide their own pillow and blankets or rent them from 
the linen service. A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of any- 
thing other than luggage will not be available. 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union Building 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

There are no University housing facilities in Baltimore available for women. 

Diplomas 

Members of the Senior Class must fill out an "Application for Diploma Form." 

Commencement 

All graduating seniors are required to attend the Pre-commencement and 
Commencement ceremonies unless excused in writing by the Dean. 






Buildings and Facilities 



Davidge Hall 

This hall, at 522 West Lombard Street, is named after the first dean. Dr. John 
Beale Davidge, and was the first building of the medical school to be erected. 
It was completed in 1812 and is a replica of the Pantheon in Rome. It is the 
oldest structure in this country from which the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
has been granted annually since its erection. It is located at the N.E. corner of 
Lombard and Greene Streets and houses the offices of the Dean, and his staff, 
the Committee on Admissions, the Postgraduate Committee, Medical Alumni 
Office, in addition to Chemical and Anatomical Halls. 

A dministration Building 

520 West Lombard Street contains facilities of the Department of Physical 
Therapy. 

Bressler Research Laboratory 

The Frank C. Bressler Research Laboratory at 29 S. Greene Street, a memorial 
to a generous alumnus, was completed in 1940. 

It houses the Department of Anatomy in addition to the research facilities 
of the departments of Medicine and Surgery, animal quarters, the Bressler Memorial 
Room, and the Baltimore Offices of the Board of Regents and the President of 
the University. 

Gray Laboratory 

This building houses research laboratories of the various Clinical Departments 
and offices of the Department of Physical Therapy. 

Howard Hall 

660 West Redwood Street houses the Departments of Biochemistry, Biophysics, 
Cell Biology and Pharmacology, Microbiology, Pathology, and Physiology in 
addition to the Health Sciences Computer Center and the Central Animal 
Quarters of the School of Medicine. In this building also are located the Balti- 
more Office of the Registrar and Cashier, the Office of Admissions, and various 
other administrative offices of the Schools on the Baltimore Campus. 

Medical Technology Building 

31 South Greene Street houses some of the offices and laboratories of the 
Department of Pathology, offices of the Department of Preventive Medicine. 
and research laboratories of the Department of Pediatrics. 

29 





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University Hospital • 33 

University Hospital 

University Hospital is part of the University of Maryland. It is one of the oldest 
institutions for the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary and at that time 
consisted of only four wards, one of which was reserved for patients with diseases 
of the eye. 

In 1933-1934 the present University Hospital was erected with a capacity of 
435 beds and 65 bassinets. In 1952-1953 a modern Psychiatric Institute Building 
was erected and a junctional wing was added to the general hospital. New additions 
have increased the hospital bed capacity to 667 beds and 70 bassinets devoted to 
general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and the various medi- 
cal and surgical specialties. All hospital accommodations, whether private, semi- 
private, ward, or specialized, are available to the teaching programs. 

The hospital buildings are situated opposite the Medical School buildings. 
The students, therefore, are in close proximity to the clinical facilities of the 
University Hospital. The hospital as planned, makes a particularly attractive 
teaching unit and is the major clinical teaching facility of the Medical School. 

EMERGENCY SERVICE 

The Emergency Service of the hospital receives and treats a large number of 
emergency cases because of its proximity to the largest manufacturing and shipping 
districts of the city. During the past fiscal year a total of 42,325 patients were 
treated in the Emergency Room. 

OUT PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

The Out Patient Department is in the old University Hospital. It has been 
remodeled to provide space and facilities for more than fifty clinics, the de- 
partments of X-ray, a pharmacy, laboratory, and other ancillary services. Ad- 
mission policies are predicated upon the teaching requirements of the School of 
Medicine and the ward services of the University Hospital. 

Visits to the various clinics of the Out Patient Department during the last 
fiscal year totaled 153,187. 

Health Sciences Library 

The Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, and Social Work are 
served by the Health Sciences Library in a modern, four-story library building 
completed in 1960. The oldest part of the library collection dates back to 1813 
when the University of Maryland purchased the books of Dr. John Crawford 
to form a medical library. The present library contains more than 110,000 bound 
volumes and regularly receives over 2,500 scientific periodicals. 

The library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and the Welch 
Medical Library are open to students of the School of Medicine without charge. 
Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody Library and the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Howard Rovelstad, Director of Libraries and Professor of Library Science; 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 1940. 
*Ida Marian Robinson, Librarian Emeritus; A.B., Cornell University, 1924; 

B.S.L.S., Columbia University School of Library Service, 1944. 



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36 • Library Staff 

*Hilda E. Moore, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science; A.B., 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; A.B.L.S., Emory University Library 

School, 1937. 
*Edith M. Coyle, Assistant Librarian for Technical Services; A.B., University of 

North Carolina, 1937; A.B.L.S., University of North Carolina School of Library 

Science, 1939; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 
*Eleanor M. Mitten, Assistant Librarian for Readers' Services; B.S., Cornell 

University, 1942; B.S.L.S., Syracuse University School of Library Science, 1949. 
Marlayne Ances, Assistant Reference Librarian; B.A., Connecticut College for 

Women, 1953; A.M.L.S., University of Michigan, 1965. 
Sarah L. Atkins, Cataloging Assistant. 
Sharon I. Blackman, Circulation Assistant. 
Melayn Dorfler, Assistant Serials Librarian; B.S., Denison University, 1963; 

A.M.L.S., University of Michigan, 1965. 
Margaret S. C. Feng, Assistant Cataloger; B.A., National Taiwan University, 

1960; B.L.S., University of Ottawa Library School, 1963. 
* Elizabeth A. Forney, Head, Reference Department; A.B., Oberlin College, 1940; 

M.S.L.S., Drexel Institute School of Library Science, 1962. 
Charles W. Fosler III, Serials Assistant. 
Willard T. Frampton, Library Clerk. 
Norma E. Handy, Cataloging Assistant. 
Ruth E. Hanna, Assistant Acquisitions Librarian; A.B., Hanover College, 1939; 

M.S.L.S., Catholic University of America, 1961. 
Mary B. Haskell, Assistant Cataloger; A.B., Vassar College, 1963; M.S.L.S., 

Catholic University of America, 1965. 
Lorraine S. Hlavin, Serials Assistant. 
*Simone C. Hurst, Head, Circulation Department. 
Margaret M. Jones, Cataloger; A.B., Shaw University, 1947; M.S.L.S., Atlanta 

University School of Library Service, 1951. 
Cecilia J. Kyler, Serials Assistant. 

Denyse B. Levin, Circulation Assistant, B.A., University of Maryland, 1966. 
Hans-Guenther R. Listfeldt, Serials Reference Librarian; B.S., Loyola College, 

1956; M.S.L.S., Catholic University of America, 1961. 
Luz V. Osores, Acquisitions Assistant. 
Elizabeth Palmer, Secretary to the Librarian. 
Sydnae M. Rouse, Assistant Reference Librarian; B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 

1964; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 
Elwood Sterling, Library Assistant. 

""Certified Medical Librarian. 



Affiliated Institutions 



Mercy Hospital 

Mercy Hospital traces its history to the foundation of the Washington School 
of Medicine in 1824. In 1872 some of the members of this institution founded 
a new school, which was the beginning of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Baltimore. 

Washington School of Medicine opened a dispensary and a small hospital 
at the corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets and named it the Baltimore City 
Hospital. This building served both as a hospital and a medical school. In 1874 
the Sisters of Mercy, upon the invitation of Washington School of Medicine, 
assumed responsibility for the Nursing Services of the hospital. In 1876, Wash- 
ington University merged with the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

In 1888 the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, began construction of a new hospital adjacent to 
the earlier buildings. In 1909, the name of the institution was changed to "Mercy 
Hospital." 

Many additions have been made to the physical plant over the years. The 
present twenty-one story, modern hospital building opened in 1963. A new 
gastroenterological research laboratory was completed in 1965. A center for 
gastrointestinal endoscopy has also been established. 

The hospital is very active in the teaching program of the medical school. Faculty 
members serve as fulltime heads of medicine, surgery, and pediatrics. Medical 
students rotate through the Mercy Hospital clinical services during the second, 
third, and fourth years. 

During the year ending December 31, 1965, there were 12,635 general ad- 
missions, 26,985 dispensary visits, 2,209 obstetrical deliveries, and 20,129 emer- 
gency visits in the Accident Department. 

The bed capacity is 333 plus 48 bassinets. All hospital beds are available for 
teaching purposes, 71 of them specifically as service beds. A School of Nursing, a 
School of Medical Technology, and a School of X-Ray Technology are con- 
ducted in conjunction with the hospital. 

The James Lawrence Kernan Hospital and Industrial School of 
Maryland for Crippled Children 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Dickeyville. The site is 
within the northwestern city limits and of easy access to the city proper. 

Its facilities are used to teach pediatric orthopedics to medical students and 
house officers. 

A hospital unit, complete in every respect, offers all modern facilities for the 
care of an orthopedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 114 beds— endowed, and city and state supported. 
The orthopedic dispensary at the University Hospital is maintained in closest 
affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from the Kernan Hospital. The 
Physical Therapy Department is very well equipped with modern apparatus and 
trained personnel. Occupational therapy has been fully established and developed 
under trained technicians. 

37 




Mercy Hospital 



Affiliated Institutions • 39 

Baltimore City Hospitals 

This is the only municipal hospital and has a bed capacity of 2,063. The de- 
partments of the hospital are: Anesthesiology, Chronic and Community Medicine. 
Dentistry, Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology. Pathology, Pediatrics, Physical 
Medicine and Rehabilitation, Psychiatry, Radiology, Surgery, and Tuberculosis. 

The acute hospital has 425 beds and is devoted to the usual medical activities. 
The chronic hospitals, where physical rehabilitation is emphasized on all patients, 
are devoted to chronic and degenerative diseases, as well as tuberculosis. 

There is a strong affiliation between the School of Medicine and the Depart- 
ments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Anesthesiology, Radiology, and Medicine. 
The heads of these departments as well as the clinical instructors are members of 
the University of Maryland School of Medicine faculty. They participate not 
only in teaching medical students, but are active in the planned programs for 
house staff education. The practical teaching of Obstetrics is carried out in this 
institution, while partial instruction in several areas of Medicine and Anesthesiology 
are under the directorship of the respective clinical department heads. 



Maryland General Hospital 

The Maryland General Hospital began humbly about 1883 at a location on 
Linden Avenue, north of Madison Street, with a capacity of 50 beds. Five years 
later, a college building (The Baltimore Medical College), was erected on Madison 
Street and a maternity service known as The Maryland-Lying-in Hospital opened 
on Linden Avenue contiguous to the main building. Three years later the Dental 
Building followed. 

Early in 1911 came a radical change. The Baltimore Medical College, including 
its College of Dentistry, was consolidated with the University of Maryland. This 
left portions of two buildings tenantless and functionless. Then came three 
Methodist groups, federating their purses and courage in purchasing and oper- 
ating a hospital. 

Two campaigns for funds, two years apart, met a heartening response from 
people of all faiths. Debts were extinguished and mortgage bonds retired. 
Property improvements began on a large scale. Both buildings were soundly 
converted to hospital uses. 

In 1921 a successful campaign was completed to construct a modern nurses' 
home. 

In July, 1954, a contract was entered into for the creation of a seven story 
building— the first phase of the building program— and was dedicated in Decem- 
ber, 1956. The new building made possible the demolition of the old buildings. 
The second phase of the program was completed in November, 1962. 

The present bed complement is 385 plus 40 bassinets. In addition to increasing 
the bed capacity, construction of modern laboratories, recovery room, surgery, 
and x-ray departments, the new departments of an intensive care unit, a radio- 
isotope laboratory, and cardio-pulmonary function laboratories were incorporated 
into this facility. 

For the year 1965-1966, there were 13.422 admissions. 8,225 surgical pro- 
cedures, and 1,931 obstetrical deliveries. 

The Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital has been merged with Maryland 
General and architectural drawings are complete for construction of a seven- 
story facility for the Eye, Ear and Throat Division, to include a modern out- 



40 • Historical Sketch 

patient department capable of handling 35,000 visits annually. Completion is 
anticipated by February, 1968. 

Eye Research Foundation of Bethesda 

The Eye Research Foundation is affiliated with the Department of Ophthal- 
mology, and is located at 8710 Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda. Research and 
clinical facilities are used for research and training programs. 



Historical Sketch 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland, the fifth medical school 
to be founded in the United States, filled a great need for such an institution in 
the Baltimore area. On December 18. 1807, the General Assembly of the State 
of Maryland passed "An Act for Founding a Medical College in the City or 
Precincts of Baltimore for the Instruction of Students in the Different Branches of 
Medicine." The philosophy of the founding fathers and the principles upon 
which the school was established have not changed. This is aptly expressed in 
the opening paragraphs of the Founding Act: "WHEREAS ... it appears to the 
General Assembly that many benefits would accrue, not only to the State of 
Maryland but to many other parts of the United States, from the establishment of 
a seminary for the promotion of medical knowledge in the City of Baltimore, 
therefore. Be It Enacted . . . That a College ... by the name of The College of 
Medicine of Maryland, be established . . . upon the following fundamental 
principles. . . . The said College shall be founded and maintained forever upon 
a most liberal plan, for the benefit of students of every country and every re- 
ligious denomination, who shall be freely admitted to equal privileges and ad- 
vantages of education, and to all the honors of the College, according to their 
merit, without requiring or enforcing any religious or civil tests." 

The direction of the College of Medicine was vested in a Board known as 
"The Regents of the College" comprising the Board of Medical Examiners, the 
President, and Professors of the College. 

Dr. John Beale Davidge was selected as the first dean of the school. Under 
his farsighted leadership the original faculty formulated a new concept of medical 
education: "The science of medicine could not be successfully taught under the 
usual organization of medical schools; that without the aids of physiology and 
pathology, either associated with anatomy or as a separate chair of institutes, the 
philosophy of the body in sickness or in health could not be understood." 

The first session of the College was not complete and lectures were delivered 
in the homes of Dr. Davidge, other members of the faculty, and at the Almshouse. 
From the beginning the School was fortunate in having patients at the Almshouse 
for use in bedside teaching. 



Historical Sketch • 41 

The first recorded public graduation was in 1810 with five graduates listed, 
three from Maryland and two from Virginia. 

At the end of 1807 there was, in Baltimore, a medical college with officers 
and faculty but no buildings or money. A lottery was authorized in the amount 
of $10,000, which was subsequently increased to $40,000. The faculty contributed 
what it could and interested citizens helped to raise funds with which to begin 
the school and provide for its maintenance. 

The location selected for the College of Medicine was the northeast corner 
of Lombard and Greene Streets on property owned by Col. John Eager Howard 
of Revolutionary War fame. Mr. R. Cary Long, an eminent architect, drew 
plans for the beautiful replica of the Pantheon which stands today and houses 
the two old amphitheatres, the offices of the Dean, the Alumni Association, 
Postgraduate Committee, and other administrative offices. This building was first 
occupied late in the year of 1812. It is the oldest building in this country from 
which the degree of Doctor of Medicine has been granted annually since its 
erection. In this building one of the first medical school libraries in the United 
States was founded. 

The Faculty and Regents endeavored constantly to improve the curriculum 
and teaching facilities. New faculty members were secured and new methods were 
introduced in the school. Dr. John Crawford, one of the new faculty members, 
vaccinated Baltimoreans against smallpox during 1800, while Dr. Waterhouse 
was doing the same for citizens of Boston. As early as 1810 he presented evidence 
that tuberculosis was contagious. His personal library became the nucleus of 
the present Medical School Library. 

In 1812 the General Assembly authorized founding of the additional Schools 
of Law, Divinity, and Arts and Sciences. The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine was unique in the history of education, since the medical school 
preceded the undergraduate and other professional schools. 

The Baltimore Infirmary, the forerunner of the University Hospital, was built in 
1823. The School was one of the first to have its own hospital for clinical instruc- 
tion, and it was here that intramural residency for senior students was first 
established. 

There were many "firsts" through the years. The study of human anatomy 
was recognized as basic for the acquisition of medical knowledge, but dissection 
was limited by the difficulty in obtaining bodies. The trustees recommended 
compulsory dissection as early as 1833, but the faculty did not enforce the 
recommendation until 1848, the first medical school in the country with such a 
requirement. Finally, enactment of the Anatomy Law provided unclaimed bodies to 
the medical schools for dissection (1882). At the College of Medicine of Maryland 
instruction was given in Dentistry (1837) and in the techniques of ausculation 
and percussion (1841) for the first time in America. In 1844 Dr. David Stewart, 
the first professor of pharmacy in the United States, initiated his lectures at 
the School, and compulsory courses in Experimental Physiology and Microscopy 
were introduced in 1854. The first independent chairs for teaching Diseases of 
Women and Children (1867) and Diseases of the Eye and Ear (1873) were es- 
tablished. Systematic clinical instruction in Nervous Diseases was instituted in 1869. 

The Faculty and Regents recognized the need for medical education to include 
areas other than the sciences. In 1891 a rule was adopted which required each 
student to complete successfully a preliminary examination in English before 
being admitted. 

At the time of the charter the course of instruction was only four months. In 



42 • Historical Sketch 

1848 it was increased to four and a half months and attendance at two sessions 
was required. In 1891 the period of instruction was increased to three years and 
in 1896 all Doctor of Medicine candidates were required to complete a four year 
course of instruction. 

Graduate programs were offered as early as 1860 and a special ten weeks 
summer course was given in 1870. These were the initial Postgraduate courses 
which have continued to the current era. 

Honorary degrees have been conferred upon outstanding persons on rare 
occasions. The honorary M.D. degree conferred upon Dr. Ephraim McDowell 
by the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1825 was his only degree. 
The Marquis de Lafayette was awarded the honorary degree of LL.D. during his 
visit to America in 1824. 

The University of Maryland School of Medicine enjoys a rich heritage be- 
queathed by two other medical schools and their affiliated hospitals. Mergers 
with the Baltimore Medical College in 1913 and the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1915 provided the University of Maryland School of Medicine with 
greatly expanded faculty and clinical facilities. 

The state University was established in 1920 when the professional schools in 
Baltimore merged with the Maryland State College of Agriculture at College 
Park, Maryland. The state of Maryland assumed the financial obligation of all of 
the schools. 

Throughout the many years since the Medical School's founding the prime 
emphasis has been placed on fitting men and women for the practice of medicine. 
Significant research contributions were made by many graduates although systematic 
programs of experimentation received greater emphasis in the later years, es- 
pecially since the erection of the Bressler Research Laboratory in 1939-1940. 

Women first entered the Medical School in 1921. There were six women in the 
1922 class, two of whom completed the four year course of study. The School 
was integrated racially almost from the beginning and students of most races 
have completed the course of study and graduated. 



Administration 



BOARD OF REGENTS AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 



Chairman 

Vice -Chairman 
Secretary 

Treasurer 
Assistant Secretary 
Assistant Treasurer 

Members 



Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 

21202 

Edward F. Holter 

Route No. 5, Frederick 21701 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 

21201 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 21629 

Louis L. Kaplan 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 21215 

Richard W. Case 

1 Charles Center, Baltimore 21201 

Mrs. Gerald D. Morgan 

RFD No. 3, Gaithersburg 20760 

William B. Long 

Medical Center, Salisbury 21801 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 21501 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

6505 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville 20782 

43 



44 • Officers of Administration 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

WILSON H. ELKINS, B.A., M.A., LITT.B., D.PHIL. 

President 

ALBIN O. KUHN, B.S., M.S., PH.D. 

Vice President, Baltimore Campuses 

WILLIAM S. STONE, M.S., M.D., D.SC. 

Director, Medical Education and Research, and Dean 

EUGENE JOSEPH LINBERG, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Dean of Curriculum and Instruction 

MITCHELL J. ROSENHOLTZ, B.A., M.D. 

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs 

KARL H. WEAVER, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Dean for Admissions 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, M.S. 

Director of Admission and Registrations 



Faculty Board 



ACADEMIC SESSION 1967-1968 

Dr. William S. Stone, Chairman 
Dr. Eugene J. Linberg, Vice Chairman and Secretary 

DEPARTMENTAL HEADS 

anatomy Dr. Frank H. J. Figge 

anesthesiology Dr. Martin Helrich 

biological chemistry Dr. Elijah Adams 

biophysics Dr. Lorin J. Mullins 

cell biology and pharmacology . . Dr. H. Vasken Aposhian 
continuing education committee . . Dr. Ephraim Lisansky 

international medicine Dr. Christian R. Klimt 

medicine Dr. Theodore E. Woodward 

microbiology Dr. Charles L. Wisseman, Jr. 

neurology Dr. Erland Nelson 

obstetrics-gynecology Dr. Arthur L. Haskins 

ophthalmology Dr. Richard D. Richards 

pathology Dr. Harlan I. Firminger 

pediatrics Dr. Karl H. Weaver (Acting) 

physiology Dr. William D. Blake 

preventive medicine Dr. George Entwisle 

psychiatry Dr. Eugene B. Brody 

radiology Dr. John M. Dennis 

surgery Dr. Robert W. Buxton 

ELECTED MEMBERS AND ALTERNATES 



Department 
Anatomy 



Members 



DR. VERNON KRAHL 
DR. JOSEPH WELLS 



A Iter nates 



DR. C. G. CRISPENS, JR. 
DR. T. E. LEVEQUE 



Term 
Expires 



1967 
1969 



A nesthesiology 

DR. MARTIN I. GOLD 



DR. JOHN M. ATWOOD 



1968 



45 



46 • Faculty Board 



Department Members 

Biological Chemistry 

DR. SEYMOUR POMERANTZ 

Biophysics 

DR. RAYMOND A. SJODIN 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology 

DR. RAYMOND BURGISON 



Term 
A Iternates Expires 



DR. A. J. EMERY, JR. 1968 



DR. ALBERT HYBL 1969 



DR. EDWARD B. TRUITT, JR. 1968 



Medicine 



DR. JAMES KARNS 
DR. JOHN WISWELL 
DR. HOWARD F. RASKIN 



DR. LEONARD SCHERLIS 1967 

DR. EDWARD COTTER 1968 

DR. CHARLES SHAW 1969 



Microbiology 

DR. EDWARD ROSENZWEIG 



DR. OLLIE R. EYLAR 



1967 



Neurology 

DR. JEROME MERLIS 



DR. ALBERT HECK 



1968 



Obstetrics-Gyneeology 

DR. U. VILLASANTA 
DR. JAMES P. DURKAN 



DR. E. MOSZKOWSKI 
DR. BOBBY A. RIMER 



1968 

1969 



Ophthalmology 

DR. SAMUEL L. FOX 



DR. STANLEY S. SCHOCKET 1967 



Pathology 



DR. ROBERT SCHULTZ 



DR. WILLIAM TOLL 



1969 



Pediatrics 



DR. KARL H. WEAVER 
DR. MILTON GROSSMAN 
DR. GEORGE LENTZ 



DR. RICHARD L. LONDON 
DR. RAYMOND CLEMMENS 
DR. SAMUEL P. BESSMAN 



1967 

1968 
1969 



Physiology 

DR. LEO M. KARPELES 



DR. PAUL D. COLEMAN 



1967 



Preventive Medicine 

DR. MAUREEN HENDERSON 



DR. HARLE V. BARRETT 



1969 



Psychiatry 

DR. VIRGINIA HUFFER 
DR. GERALD D. KLEE 
DR. FRANK RAFFERTY 



DR. BENJAMIN POPE 
DR. LINDBERGH S. SATA 
DR. WALTER WEINTRAUB 



1967 

1968 
1969 



Radiology 



DR. DONALD A. WOLFEL 



DR. JAMES A. LYON 



1968 



Faculty Board • 47 
Surgery 

DR. C. THOMAS FLOTTE DR. ARLIE MANSBERGER 1967 

DR. CYRUS L. BLANC HARD DR. EARL GALLEHER 1968 

DR. GEORGE AUSTIN DR. EVERARD COX 1969 



DIVISIONAL HEADS 



Medicine 

dr. carroll spurling Clinical Pathology 

dr. Leonard a. scherlis .... Cardiology 

Radiology 

dr. john m. dennis Diagnosis 

dr. fernando bloedorn .... Therapy 

Surgery 

dr. james G. Arnold, jr Neurological Surgery 

dr. r. adams cowley Thoracic Surgery 

Preventive Medicine 

dr. paul f. richardson .... Physical Medicine & 

Rehabilitation 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Term 
Members: Expires: 

DR. C. PARKE SCARBOROUGH 1968 

DR. HOWARD B. MAYS 1968 



HOSPITAL MEDICAL BOARD 



Term 
Members: Expires: 

dr. harry c. bowie, President 1967 

dr. francis J. borges, Secretary 1967 



DEAN'S OFFICE 



dr. william s. stone Dean 

dr. george yeager Associate Dean and 

Hospital Director 
dr. eugene J. linberg Assistant Dean of 

Curriculum 
dr. Mitchell J. rosenholtz .... Assistant Dean of 

Student Affairs 
dr. karl h. weaver Assistant Dean of 

Admissions 



Medical School Representatives 
to the University Senate 

DR. ELIJAH ADAMS 1967 

DR. SAMUEL P. BESSMAN 1967 

DR. FRANCIS J. BORGES 1967 

DR. LEONARD SCHERLIS 1967 

DR. MERRILL J. SNYDER 1967 

DR. RICHARD D. RICHARDS 1968 

DR. ERLAND NELSON 1968 

DR. WILLIAM J. ADELMAN 1968 

DR. WILLIAM D. BLAKE 1968 

DR. ARLIE R. MANSBERGER 1968 

DR. HARLAN I. FIRMINGER 1969 

DR. ROBERT W. BUXTON 1969 

DR. CYRUS L. BLANC HARD 1969 

DR. GEORGE N. AUSTIN 1969 

DR. OLLIE R. EYLAR 1969 

Executive Committee of the Faculty 

dr. william s. stone Dean— Chairman 

DR. ELIJAH ADAMS 

DR. YASKEN APOSHIAN 

DR. WILLIAM D. BLAKE 

DR. EUGENE B. BRODY 

DR. ROBERT W. BUXTON 

DR. JOHN M. DENNIS 

DR. FRANK H. J. FIGGE 

DR. HARLAN I. FIRMINGER 

DR. ARTHUR L. HASKINS 

DR. MARTIN HELRICH 

DR. EPHRAIM LISANSKY 

DR. FRED R. MC CRUMB 

DR. LORIN J. MULLENS 

DR. ERLAND NELSON 

DR. RICHARD D. RICHARDS 

DR. CHARLES WISSEMAN. JR. 

DR. THEODORE E. WOODWARD 

DR. GEORGE H. YEAGER 

dr. eugene J. linberg Assistant Dean 

dr. mitceeell j. rosenholtz Assistant Dean 

dr. karl h. weaver Assistant Dean 

ELECTED MEMBERS 
DR. GEORGE N. AUSTIN 
DR. VERNON E. KRAHL 

DR. ROBERT B. SC HULTZ 
DR. JOHN G. WISWELL 

48 



Faculty 1967-1968-1969 



Emeriti 

Margaret B. ballard, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emeritus 

j. edmund Bradley, m.d.. Professor of Pediatrics, Emeritus 

frank w. hachtel, m.d.. Professor of Bacteriology, Emeritus 

F. L. Jennings, m.d., Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus 

john c. krantz, jr., PH.D., Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus 

william s. love, m.d., Professor of Clinical Medicine, Emeritus 

ruth d. musser, M.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus 

john morris reese, m.d., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emeritus 

Dietrich c. smith, PH.D., Professor of Physiology, Emeritus 

HUGH R. spencer, m.d., Professor of Pathology, Emeritus 

w. Houston toulson, m.d., Professor of Urology, Emeritus 

allen fisk voshell, m.d.. Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus 

Walter d. wise, m.d.. Professor of Surgery, Emeritus 

waitman F. zinn, M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology, Emeritus 

A ctive 

Anatomy 

Frank H. J. Figge, Professor and Head of the Department; B.A., Colorado College, 1927; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 
Harry C. Bowie, Associate in Clinical Anatomy; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1933; M.D., 

1936. 
Otto C. Brantigan, Professor of Clinical Anatomy; B.S., Northwestern University. 1931; 

M.D., 1934. 
Melvin H. Bulmash. Instructor; B.A.. Johns Hopkins University, 1946; D.D.S.. University 

of Maryland School of Dentistry. 1950. 
Charles G. Crispens. Jr.. Associate Professor; B.S., Pennsylvania State University. 1953; 

M.S.. Ohio State University, 1955; Ph.D., Washington State University, 1959. 
Edward J. Donate Instructor; B.A., King's College, 1951; Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1964. 
Vernon E. Krahl, Professor; B.S.. University of Pittsburgh. 1939; M.S.. 1940: Ph.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1946. 
Theodore F. Leveque, Professor; B.A.. University oi' Denver, 1949; M.S.. 1950; Ph.D.. 

University of Colorado, 1954. 
E. G. Linhardt, Instructor; M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine. 1937. 
Jason M. Masters. Instructor; B.A., High Point College, 1951; M.S., Sul Ross State College. 

1956, Ph.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1965. 
Robert B. McFadden, Instructor; B.S., Loyola College, Baltimore. 1940; M.D.. University 

of Maryland, 1943. 
Karl Frederick Mech, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Maryland. 1932; M.D.. 

1935. 

49 



50 • Faculty 

Neil Novin, Instructor; B.A.. New York University, Washington Square College of Arts 
and Sciences. 1951; M.D., State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Col- 
lege of Medicine, 1955. 

Edward H. Polley, Assistant Professor; A.B., DePauw University, 1947; M.S., St. Louis 
University, 1949; Ph.D., St. Louis University, 1951. 

Frederick J. Ramsay, Assistant Professor; B.S., Washington and Lee University. 1958; 
M.S., University of Illinois, Chicago Professional Colleges, 1960; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, Chicago Professional Colleges, 1962. 

Marshall L. Rennels, Assistant Professor; B.S., Eastern Illinois University, 1961; M.A., 
University of Texas, Medical Branch, 1964; Ph.D., University of Texas, Medical Branch, 
1966. 

William Booth Settle, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy; B.A., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1930; M.D., 1933. 

Gladys E. Wadsworth, Assistant Professor; B.S., State Teachers College, 1936; M.A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., University of Maryland School of 
Medicine, 1955. 

William Wallace Walker, Associate Professor of Clinical Anatomy; B.S., West Virginia 
University, 1921; M.D., University of Maryland, 1923. 

Jobeph Wells, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1956; Ph.D., Duke 
University, 1959. 



Research Assistant 
Thomas A. Burns 

Graduate Student Assistants 
G. Kenneth Adams 
Edward W. Lampton, Jr. 
C. Boyd Pfeiffer 
Joel M. Snyder 
Robert L. Strautz 



Charles P. Barrett 
Daniel A. Donaghue 
Joseph Jenci 
Edward W. Lampton, 
Margaret L. Olivier 
John P. Petrali 
C. Boyd Pfeiffer 
Joel Myron Snyder 
Robert L. Strautz 



Jr. 



Graduate Students Majoring in Anatomy 
G. Kenneth Adams 



Fellows 

G. Kenneth Adams 



Anesthesiology 

Martin Helrich, Professor and Head of the Department; B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 
John M. Atwood, Assistant Professor; A.B., Washington and Lee, 1942; M.D., Washington 

University, 1945. 
Louis R. Baker, Assistant Professor; A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1953; M.D., Jefferson 

Medical College, 1957. 
Anthony R. Boccuti, Instructor (part time); M.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 
Peter Chodoff, Assistant Professor (part time); M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1951. 
Gina Glick, Instructor; M.D., Loyola University, Stritch School of Medicine, 1956. 
Martin I. Gold, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1950; M.D., State 

University of New York, College of Medicine, Brooklyn, 1954. 
John A. Jenicek, Col. (MC), USA, Associate Professor (part-time); M.D., University of 

Illinois, 1946. 
Y. Victor Kent, Instructor (part time); M.D., University of Istanbul, 1951. 
Renee Landesmann, Instructor (part time); M.D., Tulane University, 1961. 
T. Crawford McAslan, Instructor; M.B., Ch.B., University of Glasgow, 1945; D.A., 

Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 196 1 . 
Alfred T. Nelson, Clinical Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 
John W. Pearson, Instructor; M.D., Oxford University School of Medicine, 1953. 
Joseph S. Redding, Associate Professor; A.B., University of North Carolina, 1943; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1948. 



Faculty 



51 



Anthony Ruvolo. Instructor; M.D.. University of Messina, Italy, 1949 
Calbert T. Seebert, Assistant Professor; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1951. 
Beatrice L. Selvin, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Michigan. 1942; M.D., New 
York Medical College, 1945. 



Biological Chemistry 

Elijah Adams, Professor and Head of the Department; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 

1938; M.D., University of Rochester, 1942. 
Samuel P. Bessman, Professor (part time); M.D.. Washington University, 1944. 
Vernon C. Bode, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Missouri, 1955; Ph.D.. University 

of Illinois (Urbana), 1961. 
Ann Virginia Brown, Instructor; A.B.. Goucher College, 1940. 
Arthur J. Emery, Jr., Associate Professor; B.S., Bucknell University, 1946; Ph.D.. University 

of Rochester, 1954. 
Rosa M. Gryder. Instructor; B.S., Bucknell University, 1947; M.S.. Yale University, 1949; 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 
Mary E. Kirtley, Assistant Professor; B.A. University of Chicago, 1957; M.A.. Smith 

College, 1958; Ph.D.. Western Reserve, 1964. 
Ennis C. Layne, Assistant Professor (part time); B.S., George Washington University, 1950; 

M.S.. 1953; Ph.D.. 1955. 
Seymour Pomerantz, Associate Professor; B.A.. Rice Institute. 1948; Ph.D.. University of 

Texas, 1952. 



Research Associate 
Yung-Feng Chang, 



M.S., Ph.D. 



Research Assistants 
Sandra J. Antoine, B.S. 
Gloria R. Rosso, M.S. 
Kikuko Takashima, M.S. 



Fellows 

Sister Denise Eby. 



M.S. 



Thomas H. Finlay. B.S. 
Aida Goldstein, M.S. 
Dennis P. Harrison. B.S. 
Dennis Hinton, B.S. 
Lilly Li. B.S. 
Patricia E. Low. M.S. 
Vadiraja V. Murthy, B.S. 
Nancy Sternberger. B.S. 



Biophysics 

Lorin J. Mullins, Professor and Chairman of the Department; B.S.. University of California. 

1937; Ph.D.. 1940. 
Raymond A. Sjodin. Professor; B.S.. California Institute of Technology. 1951; Ph.D.. 

University of California, 1955. 
Albert Hybl. Assistant Professor; B.A., Cog College, 1954; Ph.D.. California Institute of 

Technology. 1961. 
Antonio S. Frumento, Visiting Professor of Biophysics; M.D.. Universitv of Buenos Aires. 

1955. 



Fellows 

Ann L. Abeles. Fellow 

Kenneth R. Bard all, Fellow 

Luis A. Beauge. Postdoctoral Fellow 

Paul J. De Weer. Postdoctoral Fellow 

Marshall G. Doane, Fellow 

Douglas L. Dorset, Fellow 

Carl Jelenko III, Special Fellow 



Neil F. Johnson. Fellow 
Hiroshi Kitasaio. Postdoctoral Fellow 
Simir Mary Blanche. Fellow 
Walter A. Pangborn, Fellow 
Lawrence S. Rosen. Fellow 

James M. Wideman. Postdoctoral Fellow 



52 • Faculty 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology 

H. Vasken Aposhian, Professor and Head of the Department; B.S. Brown University, 1948; 
M.S. University of Rochester, 1950; Ph.D., 1953. 

Frederick Keller Bell, Research Associate; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1916; Ph.D., 1920. 

Raymond Merritt Burgison, Professor; B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., University of 
Maryland. 1948; Ph.D.. 1950. 

C. Jelleff Carr, Adjunct Professor; B.S., University of Maryland. 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 
1937. 

Helmut Freimund Cascorbi, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Munich, 1955; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1962. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Professor, Emeritus; B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S. 1924; 
Ph.D. 1928; Emeritus, 1965. 

Ruth D. Musser, Assistant Professor, Emeritus; B.A. Goucher College, 1917; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1931; Emeritus, 1965. 

John Joseph O'Neill, Associate Professor; B.S., St. Francis College, 1942; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

Frieda G. Rudo, Assistant Professor; A.B. Goucher College, 1944; M.S., University of 
Maryland; Ph.D., 1963. 

Edward Byrd Truitt, Jr., Professor; B.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1943; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950 (on leave of absence— 1967). 

Fellows, Research Assistants, 
and A ssociates 

James P. Burns, Fellow Sylvia L. Pollack, Associate 

Irwin A. Hayman, Fellow Tetsuhiko Sakamoto, M.D., Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow 

Francis J. Meyer, Fellow Theodore S. Wang, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow 

International Medicine 

Christian R. Klimt. Professor and Head of the Department; Director, Division of Epidemi- 
ology and Biostatistics; M.D., University of Vienna, 1944; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins, 1952; 

Dr.P.H., Johns Hopkins, 1959. 
Ronald L. Anthony, Research Associate; B.A., Susquehanna University, 1961; Ph.D., 

University of Kansas, 1965. 
Mohammed A. Aziz, Assistant Professor; M.B.B.S., Dacca University, 1954; Ph.D., University 

of Minnesota, 1963. 
Richard H. Baker, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Illinois, 1959; M.S., University 

of Illinois, 1962; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1965. 
Herbert C. Barnett, Professor and Director, Division of Medical Entomology and Ecology; 

B.S., Cornell University, 1939; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1946; M.P.H., University 

of Pittsburgh, 1953; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1954. 
Fatima Begum, Research Associate; B.S., University of Karachi, 1958; M.S., University of 

London, 1960; Ph.D., University of London, 1963. 
Henry N. Buscher, Research Associate; B.S., Kansas State College, 1961; M.S., University 

of Oklahoma, 1963; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 1965. 
Paul L. Canner, Research Associate; B.A., University of Minnesota, 1960; M.S., University 

of Minnesota, 1962; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1965. 
David F. Clyde, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Kansas, 1946; M.D., McGill 

University, 1948; D.T.M.H., London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 1952; 

Ph.D., University of London, 1963. 
Michael J. Donnelly, Jr., Research Programmer of International Medicine; B.S., Mt. St. 

Marys College, 1964. 
John E. George, Assistant Professor; B.S., West Texas State University, 1957; M.S., 

Texas Technological College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1964. 
A. James Haley, Professor; B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S., University of 

New Hampshire, 1950; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 



Faculty • 53 

Gordon G. Heiner, Research Associate; A.B., Harvard University, 1948; M.A., School of 

Advanced International Studies, 1949; M.D., Temple University, 1965. 
Elizabeth Catherine Heinz, Instructor; B.A., Goucher College, 1951. 
Irwin I-Po Ho, Research Associate; B.A., National Taiwan University, 1953; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1962. 
Genell L. Knatterud, Assistant Professor; B.A., Macalester College, 1952; M.S., University 

of Minnesota, 1959; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1963. 
Witold E. Kucharski, Assistant Professor; M.D., University Central de Venezuela, 1956. 
Vincent C. McCarthy, Research Associate; B.A., University of Toronto, 1953; M.S., 

University of Maryland, 1961. 
Fred R. McCrumb, Jr., Professor and Director, Pakistan Medical Research Center; M.D., 

University of Maryland. 1948. 
Curtis L. Meinert, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1956; M.S., University 

of Minnesota, 1959; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1964. 
Gardner Middlebrook, Professor and Director, Division of Experimental Pathology; A.B.. 

Harvard University, 1938; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1944. 
Mohamed Mujeeb, Research Associate; B.S., Osmania University, 1954; M.B.B.S., Osmania 

Medical College, 1960. 
Lt. Col. Nur Ahmad, A.M.C., Professor; M.B.B.S., Punjab University, 1953; M.C., 

Path. (London), 1964. 
Suresh C. Rastogi, Research Associate; B.S., Lucknow University, 1955; M.S., Lucknow 

University, 1960; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1966. 
Richard G. Robertson, Research Associate; B.S., Brigham Young University, 1959; M.S., 

Brigham Young University, 1962. 
Akira Sasaki, Research Fellow; M.D., Osaka University, 1955. 
Syed A. S. Shah, Research Associate; B.S., University of Karachi, 1956; D.C.H., London, 

1962; E.C.F.M.G., 1962. 
Col. Ross F. Swall, Research Associate; B.S., Oregon State College, 1945; M.A., Baylor 

University, 1958 
O. Charles Tack, Jr., Research Programmer of International Medicine; B.S., United States 

Naval Academy, 1957. 
David B. Thomas, Research Associate; B.S., University of Washington, 1959; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Washington, 1963. 
Marilyn A. Wilson, Research Assistant; R.N., Bethesda Hospital School of Nursing, 1954. 
You-yen Yang, Research Associate; B.S., National Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., Kansas 

State University, 1965. 
Prospero Zevallos, Research Fellow; M.D., San Marcos University, 1957. 



Medicine 

Theodore E. Woodward, Professor of Medicine and Head of the Department; B.S.. Franklin 

and Marshall College, 1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938; D.Sc, (Hon.), Western 

Maryland College, 1950; D.Sc, (Hon.), Franklin and Marshall College, 1954. 
Conrad B. Acton, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Haverford College, 1925; M.D., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1929. 
George N. Agapitos, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Athens (Greece), 1948. 
Andres W. Anderson, Assistant; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1921; M.D., 1929. 
Reubin Andres, Associate Professor of Medicine; M.D., Southwestern Medical College, 

1944. 
Albert M. Antlitz, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Georgetown University, 1951; M.D., 1955. 
Leon Ashman, Associate in Medicine; B.S., College of the City of New York, 1927; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1932. 
Monzer Attar, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., American University of Beirut, 1957; M.D., 

1961. 
David Bacharach, Instructor in Dermatology and Syphilology; B.A., St. John's College, 

1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 



54 • Faculty 

Edmund George Beacham, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1936; M.D., 1940. 
Eugene S. Bereston, Associate Professor of Dermatology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 

1933; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1945; D.Sc., 1955. 
Emidio A. Bianco, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1950; M.D., Georgetown 

University, 1954. 
Charles J. Blazer, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Columbia University, 1942; M.D., 1945. 
Richard M. Blide, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., University of Rochester, 1951; 

M.D., Albany Medical College, 1955. 
Louis V. Blum, Associate in Medicine; B.A., University of Delaware, 1930; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1934. 
Francis J. Borges, Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief of Medicine, Montebello 

State Hospital; B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.D., 1950. 
Stuart H. Brager, Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; M.D., 1958. 
William R. Bundick, Associate in Dermatology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 
Bernard Burgin, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1936; M.D., 1939. 
Joseph W. Burnett, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Yale University, 1954; M.D., 

Harvard Medical School, 1958. 
M. Paul Byerly, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
Gordon Cader, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1948. 
Douglas G. Carrol, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Yale University, 1937; M.D., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1942. 
Patricia Charache, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., Hunter College, 1952; M.D., 

New York University School of Medicine, 1957. 
Gerard Church, Instructor in Medicine; Ch.B., University of Glasgow, 1951; F.R.F.P.S. 

(G), 1956. 
B. Stanley Cohen, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 
Jonas H. Cohen, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D., 1940. 
Thomas B. Connor, Associate Professor of Medicine, Head of the Division of Endocrinology 

and Metabolism, and Director of the Clinical Study Center; B.A., Loyola College, 1943; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 
Elmer Ellsworth Cook, Jr., Assistant in Medicine; B.A., University of Maryland, 1940; 

M.D., 1943. 
Edward F. Cotter, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate in Neurology; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1935. 
Ernest Cross, Jr., Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1937; M.D., 

1941. 
John R. Davis, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., West Virginia University, 1938; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1942. 
Marvin H. Davis, Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1940; M.D., 1943. 
Donald H. Dembo, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1955. 
Alberto Diaz, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Santo Domingo, Dominican 

Republic, 1956. 
Winston C. Dudley, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Oberlin College, 1943; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1951. 
Robert G. Duvall, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 
J. Sheldon Eastland, Associate Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1921; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
William Carl Ebeling III, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Gas- 
troenterology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1944. 
George F. Ellinger, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of Minnesota, 1931 

M.D., 1935. 
Frances A. Ellis, Professor of Clinical Dermatology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1921 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
George Entwisle, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1944 

M.D., Boston University, 1948. 



Faculty • 55 

William C. Esmond, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1940; M.D., 1951. 
Robert L. Evans, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., George Washington University, 

1948; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1952. 
Maurice Feldman, Jr., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1941; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1944. 
Anacleto C. Fernandez, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Institute of Havana, Cuba, 1929; M.D., 

1940. 
Vincent Fiocco, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Columbia University, 1954; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1957. 
Lorraine G. Fiset, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1948; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Cambridge (England), 1956. 
Philip D. Flynn, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Georgetown University, 1929; M.D., 1933. 
Wetherbee Fort, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1919. 
Irving Freeman, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1932; M.D., 

1935. 
Marion Friedman, Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., 1942. 
Audrey Funk, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Goucher College, 1940. 
Joseph C. Furnari, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1938; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1942. 
William A. Gakenheimer, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 
Marvin Goldstein, Associate in Medicine; A.B.. Johns Hopkins University, 1941; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1944. 
Caridad E. Gonzalez, Assistant in Medicine; B.S., Havana Cuba College, 1940; A.B., 

1944; M.D., University of Havana School of Medicine, 1944. 
Luis E. Gonzalez, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 
Sheldon E. Greisman, Associate Professor of Medicine; M.D., New York University, 1949. 
William H. Grenzer, Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1931; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1935. 
Lewis P. Gundry, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1924; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 
Riaz Haider, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.B., B.S., K. E. Medical College, Lahore; 

M.R.C.P. (E), 1963; M.D., Thesis accepted, 1966. 
Samuel Jay Hankin, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 
Ernest G. Hanowell, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., George Washington University. 

1946; M.D., 1948. 
Louis E. Harmon, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Lincoln University, 1928; M.D., Howard 

University, 1934. 
Jean E. Hawkins, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Georgia State College for Women, 

1951; M.A., Duke University, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 
Elizabeth C. Heinz, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Goucher College, 1951. 
William G. Helfrich, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1931; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1935. 
W. Grafton Hersperger, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 

M.D., 1933. 
Leon H. Hetherington, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., Washington and Jefferson 

College, 1923; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1930. 
Mark B. Hollander, Assistant Professor of Dermatology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
Henry W. D. Holljes, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Western Maryland College, 1941; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1944. 
Z. Vance Hooper, Associate in Gastroenterology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 
Richard B. Hornick, Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Infectious 

Diseases; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., 1955. 
Elizabeth B. Jackson, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B.. Brvn Mawr College, 1933; 

Law, 1965. 
Meyer W. Jacobson, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B.. Johns Hopkins University, 1928; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 



56 • Faculty 

Rouben Jul. Assistant Professor in Medicine; M.D., Royal College of Medicine, Baghdad, 

Iraq. 1950. 
Edward S. Kallins. Instructor in Medicine; Ph.G., University of Maryland. 1930; B.S.. 

1932; M.D., 1934. 
William H. Kammer. Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; M.D.. University 

of Maryland, 1939. 
Arthur Karfgin, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Washington College, 1929; M.D., University 

of Maryland. 1932. 
Walter E. Karfgin, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Washington College, 1932; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1936. 
James R. Karns, Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Student Health Service; B.S.. 

University of Maryland, 1939; M.D., 1940. 
Frank Thomas Kasik, Jr., Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1940; M.D., 

1950. 
Leon E. Kassel, Assistant in Medicine; M.D., University of Virginia, 1949. 
Irvin B. Kemick, Instructor in Medicine; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1933; B.S., 1935; 

M.D.. 1937. 
Laurislon L. Keown, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., St. John's College. 1929; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1933. 
H. David Kerr, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Maryville College, 1951; M.D., 

TempleiJniversity, 1956./ 
Joseph D. B. King, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Princeton University, 1941; M.D., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1944. 
Crawford N. Kirkpatrick, Jr., Instructor in Pediatrics; A.B., Harvard University, 1940; 

M.D., Columbia University, 1943. 
Leon A. Kochman, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 
Louis A. M. Krause, Professor of Clinical Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland. 1917. 
Julius R. Krevans, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., New York University. 1944; MrD., 

1946. 
Frank G. Kuehn, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 19507 
Robert G. Lancaster, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Gonzaga University, 1952; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1955. 
Ennis C. Layne, Assistant Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Head, Biochemistry Labora- 
tory; Ph.D., George Washington University, 1955. 
C. Edward Leach, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., Duke University, 1935. 
Yu-Chen Lee, Assistant Professor in Medicine; B.S., Taikoku Imperial University, 1945; 

M.D., National Taiwan University, Formosa, 1949. 
Samuel E. Legum, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1928; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 
Lee R. Lerman, Assistant in Dermatology; B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1930; M.D., 

Hahnemann Medical College, 1935. 
Philip Franklin Lerner, Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
Franklin E. Leslie, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 
Manuel Levin, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1930; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1934. 
David A. Levy, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of Maryland, 1952; M.D., 

1954. 
Kurt Levy, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Cologne, 1923. 
Anthony A. Lewandowski, Instructor in Medicine and Assistant Director of the Division 

of Renal Diseases and Hypertension; B.S., Loyola College, 1951; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1955. 
C. Milton Linthicum, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 

1945. 
Ephraim T. Lisansky, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 

1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937." 



Faculty • 57 

Leonard Lister, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Sze-Jui Liu, Associate in Medicine; M.D., National Central University Medical College, 

China, 1947. 
Vincent Lopez-Majano, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Madrid Medical 

School, Spain, 1945; Ph.D., 1950. 
William Samuel Love, Professor of Clinical Medicine, Emeritus. 
Harris Lovice, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Heidelberg College (Ohio), 1951; M.D., 

Upstate Medical Center, New York, 1955. 
Robert J. Lydej^, Assistant in Medicine; M.D., St. Louis University, 1952. 
David N. Marine, Assistant Professor in Medicine; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1947. 
Jason M. Masters, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., High Point College, 1951; M.A., Sul 

Ross State College, 1956. 
Fred R. McCrumb, Jr., Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 
George McLean, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1916. 
Joseph Mead, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Loyola College, 1954; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1958. 
George G. Merrill, Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., Princeton University, 1932; 

M.D., Harvard University, 1937. 
Stanley Miller, Associate in Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1939; M.D., 

Jefferson Medical College, 1943. 
Donald W. Mintzer, Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1944. 
Zachariah R. Morgan, Assistant Professor of Gastroenterology; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1918. 
Samuel Morrison, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Professor of Gastro- 
enterology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1925; M.D., 1929. 
Theodore H. Morrison, Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology; M.D., College of Physicians 

and Surgeons, 1915. 
S. Edwin Muller, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
Joseph E. Muse, Jr., Associate in Medicine; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 1933; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1937. 
John A. Myers, Instructor in Medicine; B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.E.E., 

1933; M.D., 1938. 
Joseph C. Myers, Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Western Maryland College, 1939; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1943. 
James J. Nolan, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1937; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1941. 
Lezek Ochota, Associate in Medicine; B.Sc, University of Fribourg, Switzerland, 1944; 

M.D., University of Zurich, Switzerland, 1948; D.Sc, University of Zurich, 1950. 
Samuel irO'MXNSKY,j Assistant in Medicine; B.A., Duke University, 1952; M.D., 1957. 
David— A. Ourslik. Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1952; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1956. 
Chris Papadopoulos, Instructor in Medicine; M.B.B.Ch., University of Alexandria (Egypt), 

1956. 
Robert T. Parker, Associate Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1941; 

M.D., 1944. 
Walter J. Pijanowski, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of North Carolina, 1937; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1939. 
Abraham A. Polachek, Associate in Medicine; B.S., City College of New York, 1935; M.D.. 

University of Texas, 1942. 
J. Emmett Queen, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Loyola College, 1939; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1943. 
M. Kevin Quinn, Assistant in Medicine; M.JB., University College, Dublin, Ireland, 1945. 
Abdul N. Rahman, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University 1952; 

M.D., 1956. 
George M. Ramapuram, Instructor in Medicine; M.B., B.S., University of Madras. 1950. 



58 • Faculty 

Jose Ramirez-Rivera, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B.. Johns Hopkins University, 

1949; M.D.. Yale University, 1953. 
Raymond Randall. Associate Professor of Clinical Investigation in Medicine; D.V.M., 

U. S. College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1917 (retired). 
Howard F. Raskin, Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Gastroenterology; 

B.A.. Johns Hopkins University. 1945; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1949. 
Joan Raskin, Assistant Professor of Medicine in Dermatology; B.A.. Goueher College. 

1951: M.D.. University of Maryland. 1955. 
Julian Reed, Instructor in Medicine; B.S.. University of Maryland; M.D.. 1952. 
Robert A. Reiter, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 1928; 

M.D.. 1932. 
John R. S. Remsberg, Associate in Medicine; B.A.. B.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.D.. 

1955. 
Samuel T. R. Revell. Jr.. Professor of Medicine and Head, Medical Outpatient Department; 

B.S.. University of Georgia. 1933; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1937. 
Harry M. Robinson. Jr., Professor of Dermatology and Head, Division of Dermatology; 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1931; M.D.. 1935. 
Raymond C. Vail Robinson. Associate Professor of Dermatology and Assistant Chief of 

Dermatology Clinic; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1936; M.D.. 1940; M.S., University of 

Pennsylvania. 1950. 
Donald J. Roop, Assistant in Medicine; B.A.. Western Maryland College. 1936; M.D.. 

University of Maryland. 1940; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1950. 
Benjamin Rothfeld. Assistant in Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsylvania. 1941; M.S.. 

1942; M.D.. Bowman Gray Sehool of Medicine. 1945. 
Seymour Rubin. Assistant in Medicine; A.B.. Johns Hopkins University, 1946; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1950. 
Edward Rusche, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Leyden (The 

Netherlands), 1954. 
Jerry Salan, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., St. Johns College, 1954; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1960. 
Elijah Saunders, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Morgan State College, 1956; M.D., University 

of Maryland. 1960. 
Leonard Scherlis, Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Cardiology; 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1942; M.D., 1945. 
Sidney Scherlis. Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsylvania. 1934; 

M.D.. University of Maryland. 1938." 
Adalbert F. Schubart, Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Arthritis; 

M.D.. University of Heidelberg, 1947. 
Marvin M. Schuster, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., University of Chicago, 1950; B.S., 

1951; M.D., 1955. 
Harry B. Scott, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., University of Virginia. 1943; M.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1947. 
Samuel Segall. Assistant in Medicine; M.D., University of Jena, Germany, 1929. 
Arthur Serpick, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.D.. 1959. 
Lawrence M. Serra, Assistant Professor of Medicine; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 

1925; M.D., 1929. 
Albert Shapiro, Assistant Professor of Dermatology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; 

M.D., 1937. 
Charles E. Shaw, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1944. 
William H. Shea, Assistant in Dermatology; B.S., Loyola College, 1947; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1951. 
Joseph Shear, Assistant in Medicine; B.S.. University of Maryland. 1943; M.D., 1947. 
Jerome Sherman, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Western Ontario, 1941. 
Margaret L. Sherrard. Assistant in Medicine; B.A.. Seton Hill College, 1945; M.D., 

University of Maryland. 1949. 
Edward L. Sherrer. Jr.. Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Bowling Green State University 

(Ohio), 1952; M.Sc. Ohio State University, 1953; M.D., 1958. 



Faculty • 59 

Elizabeth Brown SHERRILL, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; 

M.D., 1941. 
Bernard R. Shockett, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., 

1941. 
Abraham A. Silver, Assistant in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 
Emanuel H. Silverstein, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland. 1957; M.D., 

1960. 
David G. Simpson, Associate Professor of Medicine; M.B., B.Ch., Queen's University 

(Belfast); M.D., 1950. 
Bahram Sina, Instructor in Medicine; University of Tehran, 1948; University of Paris 

(France), 1952. 
Nicholas P. Sinaly, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Fordham University, 1948; M.D., New 

York University, 1952. 
Robert T. Singleton, Assistant Professor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; 

M.D., 1953. 
Solomon Smith, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
Vernon M. Smith, Professor of Medicine; M.D., Temple University, 1949. 
Ronald T. Smoot, Associate in Medicine; B.S. Howard University, 1948; M.D., 1952. 
John N. Snyder, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 
Merrill J. Snyder, Associate Professor of Medicine in Clinical Microbiology; B.S., University 

of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D., 1953. 
Neil Solomon, Associate Professor in Medicine; A.B., Western Reserve University, 1954; 

M.D., Western Reserve University, 1961; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 
William C. Speed III, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Trinity College, 1940; M.D., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1943. 
William S. Spicer, Jr., Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Pulmonary 

Diseases; M.D., University of Kansas 1949. 
Carroll L. Spurling, Associate Professor of Medicine and Acting Head, Division of 

Clinical Pathology; M.D., Bowman-Gray School of Medicine, 1947. 
John C. Stauffer, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Princeton University, 1949; M.D., Harvard 

University, 1953. 
Stanley Ray Steinbach, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1942; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 
John E. Strahan, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 
Stuart D. Sunday, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1932; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1936. 
Kyle Y. Swisher, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 
William D. Tigertt, Associate Professor of Medicine; M.D., Baylor University, 1937; A.B., 

1938. 
Yasushi Togo, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Tokyo Kotogakke (Japan). 1941; 

M.D., University of Tokyo, 1945. 
Wilfred H. Townshend, Jr., Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1940. 
M. Eugene Tudino, Instructor in Dermatology; B.S., Providence College, 1953; M.D., 

University of Bologna, 1960. 
Ralph H. Twining, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Dartmouth College, 1942; M.A.. 1944; 

M.D., New York University College of Medicine, 1948. 
Stephen J. Van Lill, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Duke University, 1938; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1943. 
FREDERICK J. Vollmer, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College. 1934; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1938. 
Gerald Wagger, Assistant Professor in Medicine; A.B., University of North Carolina. 

1953; M.D., 1957. 
Julius Waghelstein, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland. M.D., 1935. 
Lester A. Wall, Jr., Associate in Medicine; B.A., St. John's College, 1937; University of 

Maryland, 1941. 



60 • Faculty 

Ralph Weber. Associate in Medicine: B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1949: M.D.. 

Temple University. 1954. 
Daniel Wilfson. Associate in Medicine; B.A.. Western Maryland College. 1937; M.D., 

University of Maryland. 1942. 
Charles Herman Williams, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1937; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
Charles L. Wisseman. Jr.. Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A.. Southern Methodist 

University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State College, 1943; M.D.. Southwestern Medical School, 

1946. 
John G. Wlswell. Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Dalhousie University, 1938; B.S., 

1940: M.O.C.M.. 1943. 
Celeste L. Woodward, Assistant in Medicine; B.A., University Aix-Marseilles (France), 

1932: M.D.. University of Maryland, 1938. 
Joseph B. Workman. Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 

1943; M.D.. University of Maryland, 1946. 
Thomas L. Worsley. Jr.. Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of North Carolina. 1937; 

M.D.. University of Maryland. 1939. 
Stanley N. Yaffe. Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland. 1941; M.D., 

1944. 
Philip D. Zieve, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B.. Franklin and Marshall College, 1954; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Fellows 

Nijole Brazauskas, Fellow in Medicine in Infectious Diseases 

John W. Clark. Fellow in Medicine in Endocrinology 

Rex Crago. Fellow in Medicine in Endocrinology 

Jamsh d Hamed. Fellow in Medicine in Arthritis 

Jutta Heiner, Fellow in Medicine in Infectious Diseases 

Michael Hunsacker, Fellow in Medicine in Cardiology 

Mohammad Inayatullah. Fellow in Medicine in Gastroenterology 

Fred Kunkel. Fellow in Medicine in Pulmonary Diseases 

Annie Lee, Fellow in Medicine in Dermatology 

John Messina, Fellow in Medicine in Cardiology 

David Morse, Fellow in Medicine in Cardiology 

Phyllis Pullen. Fellow in Medicine in Arthritis 

Stuart Remley, Fellow in Medicine in Endocrinology 

David Shearer. Fellow in Medicine in Endocrinology 

Ralph Updike. Fellow in Medicine in Gastroenterology 

McCrae Williams. Fellow in Medicine in Radioisotopes 



Microbiology 

Charles Louis Wisseman. Jr.. Professor and Head of the Department; B.A.. Southern 

Methodist University, 1941: M.S.. Kansas State College. 1943: M.D.. Southwestern 

Medical School. 1946. 
Roberl Tralb. Research Professor; B.S., College of the Citv of New York. 1938: M.S., 

Cornell University, 1939: Ph.D.. 1947. 
Ollie Roddy Eylar. Associate Professor; B.A.. University of Minnesota. 1952; M.S., 1955; 

Ph.D.. 1959. 
Paul Fiset, Associate Professor; B.A.. Laval University. Quebec. Canada. 1944: M.D.. 

Laval University Medical School. 1949; Ph.D., University of Cambridge. England, 1956. 
Frank W. Hachfel. M.D.. Professor of Bacteriology, Emeritus. 

Hyman Edmund Levin, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland. 1922; M.D.. 1926. 
Fred R. McCrumb, Assistant Professor; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1948. 
William Frederic Myers. Assistant Professor; B.A.. University of Kansas. 1949; M.A., 

1957; Ph.D.. 1958. 



Faculty • 61 



Edward Charles Rosenzweig, Assistant Professor; A.B., Centre College, 1951; M.S. 
University of Maryland. 1956: Ph.D.. 1959. 

Merrill J. Snyder, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Pittsburgh. 1940: M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D.", 1953. 

Ruth Graeser Wittler, Adjunct Instructor; M.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1944; Ph.D. 
Western Reserve University, 1947. 



Pre- Doctoral Fellows 
Angelo P. Andrese, M.S. 
Joseph V. Osterman, B.A. 
Akira Shirai, M.S. 
Ronald Silberman, M.S. 
William T. Walsh, M.S. 
Larry E. Warfel. B.S. 

Post-Doctoral Fellows 
Allen B. Cohen. M.D. 
Irene B. Fabrikant. Ph.D. 

ZULEMA REGGIARDO, Ph.D. 

Special Fellow 

Robert M. Ollodart. M.D. 



Research Associates 
Hideo Aoki, M.D. 
Fatima Begum, Ph.D. 
Gerald A. Cole, Ph.D. 
John N. Hatgi, M.S. 
Tohko Y. Kaufmann, Ph.D. 
Richard G. Robertson, M.S. 

Assistants 

Velma Bryan (PT). A.B. 
Roy Kronmeyer 
Ruth Perry (PT), A.B. 
Helle Starcke 
Ruth Wells 



Neurology 

Erland Nelson, Professor of Neurology and Head of the Department of Neurology; A.B., 

Carthage College. 1947; M.D., Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 

1951: Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 1961. 
Jerome K. Merlis, Professor of Neurology and Professor of Clinical Neurophysiology; B.S., 

University of Louisville. 1933; M.D.. 1937; M.S.. 1938. 
Albert F. Heck, Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 1954: 

M.D.. University of Maryland. 1958. 
Barbara Hllfish. Instructor in Neurology; A.B., American University. 1944; M.D.. Uni- 
versity of Rochester, 1952. 
Morton D. Kramer. Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., University of Maryland School 

of Pharmacy; M.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 
Richard F. Mayer. Associate Professor of Neurology; B.S.. St. Bonaventure College. 1950; 

M.D., University of Buffalo School of Medicine, 1954. 
Robert S. Mosser, Assistant Professor in Pediatrics and Assistant Professor of Neurology; 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.D.. 1951. 
Anatol H. Oleynick, Instructor in Neurology; A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1952; M.D., 

University of Chicago School of Medicine, 1956. 
Helen J. Ramsey, Associate Professor of Neurology; B.S. Purdue University, 1937: M.S.. 

1938; Ph.D.. Duke University, 1941. 
Granger G. Sutton, Instructor in Neurology; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

1952: M.D.. University of Maryland. 1958.' 
Harry Allen Teitelbaum. Associate Professor of Neurology; B.S.. University of Marvland. 

1929; M.D.. 1935: Ph.D.. 1936. 
Charles Van Buskirk, Professor of Neurology; A.B.. Westminster College. 1939; M.S. 

(Microanatomy). St. Louis University, 1941: Ph.D.. University of Minnesota, 1943: M.D., 

Albany Medical College. 1947; M.S. (Neurology). University of Minnesota, l e >53. 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Arthur L. Haskins. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Head of the Department. 

B.A.. University of Rochester, 1938: M.D.. 1943. 
Isadore G. Ances, Instructor; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1956: M.D.. 1959. 



62 • Faculty 

Joseph S. Ardinger, Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.D., 1944. 

Manuel Baca, Instructor; B.S., Centre Universitari Mexico, 1948; M.D., National University 
of Mexico, 1955. 

J. Tyler Baker, Associate; B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1930; M.D., Temple Uni- 
versity, 1936. 

Margaret B. Ballard, Associate Emeritus; M.D., University of Maryland, 1926. 

Robert M. Barnett, Assistant; B.S., College of Charleston, 1951; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1959. 

Harry Mc Brine Beck, Assistant; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1939. 

Joseph P. C. Boggio, Assistant; B.S., Loyola, 1943; M.D., Georgetown University, 1955. 

Leo Brady. Assistant Clinical Professor; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1913; M.D., 1917. 

Osborne D. Christensen, Associate; M.D., George Washington University, 1935. 

Harry Cohen, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.D., 1943. 

Robert S. Coplan, Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1948; M.D., Harvard Medi- 
cal School, 1953. 

Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., Associate Clinical Professor; B.A., St. John's College, 1931; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

George Howey Davis, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., Washington College, 1932; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1936. 

Ronald L. Diener, Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.D., 1958. 

Everett S. Diggs, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 
1937. 

D. McClelland Dixon, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1932; 
M.D., 1936. 

William A. Dodd, Associate; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

John C. Dumler, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1928; M.D., 
1932. 

James Paul Durkan, Assistant Professor; A.B., Loyola College, 1955; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1959. 

Daniel Ehrlich, Associate; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1939; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1943. 

Vincent DePaul Fitzpatrick, Jr., Assistant; B.A., Loyola College, 1942; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1945. 

James Patrick Gallaher, Assistant; A.B., West Virginia University, 1947; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

Rafael Garcia. Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Zaragoza, Spain, 1952. 

Louis C. Gareis, Associate; B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1938. 

William Martin Hall, Assistant; A.B.. Lincoln University; M.D., Meharry Medical College, 
1953. 

Erwin Hecker, Assistant; B.S., Tulane University. 1944; M.D., 1947. 

Claude D. Hill, Assistant; B.S., Morgan State College, 1947; M.D., Meharry Medical 
College, 1952. 

Walter E. James. Assistant; B.S.. University of Maryland. 1935; M.D., 1955. 

D. Frank Kaltreider, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; B.A.. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland. 1937. 

Theodore Kardash, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., 
1942. 

William Kormak, Assistant; B.S., McGill University, 1942: M.D., University of Toronto, 1953. 

Norman Levin, Associate; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Charles B. Marek, Associate; B.S., University of Maryland. 1931; M.D., 1946. 

Clarence W. Martin, Assistant Clinical Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1940. 

George A. Maxwell, Associate; B.A., University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1944. 

Hugh B. McNally, Associate Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1930; M.D., 
1934. 

Edmund B. Middleton, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 

Harold R. Misenhimer, Assistant Professor; M.D., George Washington University, 1956. 



Faculty • 63 

Frank K. Morris, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.A., Loyola College, 1923; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1927. 
John Huff Morrison, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 

1934; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1940. 
Erica F. Moszkowski, Assistant Professor; B.S., Liceo Nacional De Senoritas N 1, 1946: 

M.D., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1954. 
L. Louis Mould, Clinical Instructor, M.C., M.D., Queen's University, Ontario, 1952. 
Richard Savage Munford, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Rochester, 1951; M.D., 

Yale University, 1951. 
Herbert H. Nasdor, Assistant; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Artemis P. Panayis, Instructor; M.D., University of Athens, Greece, 1958. 
Louis Leroy Randall, Assistant; B.S., Morgan State College, 1953; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1957. 
John Morris Reese, Clinical Professor Emeritus; M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 
Bobby A. Rimer, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of North Carolina, 1953; M.D., 

1957. 
J. King B. E. Seegar. Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor; B.A., Columbia University, 1933; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
James H. Shell, Jr., Assistant; B.S., Furman University, 1942; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1945. 
Isadore A. Siegel, Clinical Professor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1919; M.D., 1923. 
Stedman W. Smith, Associate; B.A., Brown University, 1936; M.D.. McGill University, 1940. 
F. X. Paul Tinker, A ssistant; B.S.. Loyola College, 1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 
James E. Toher, Associate; B.S., Providence College, 1930; M.D., Georgetown University, 

1954. 
Zsigmund J. Toth, Assistant; B.S., Louisiana State University, 1939; M.D., 1943. 
Jose G. Valderas, Assistant; B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1946; M.D., University of 

Maryland. 1947. 
Umberto VillaSanta, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Padua, Italy, 1950. 
George E. Wells, Jr., Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1947; M.D., 1934. 
Lennox S. Westney, Instructor; B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1953; M.A., Columbia 

University, 1954; M.D., Howard University, 1961. 
William S. Womack, Assistant; B.S.. Lynchburg College, 1946; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1948. 
Frederick M. Zerzavy, Assistant; M.C., Masaryk University, Brno., 1939; M.D.. University 

of Zagreb, Yugoslavia, 1942. 

Ophthalmology 

Richard D. Richards, Professor and Head of the Department; A.B., University of Michigan, 
1948; M.D., 1951; M.Sc, State University of Iowa, 1957. 

Howard N. Bernstein, Assistant Professor; B.A., Bucknell University, 1953; M.D., State 
University of New York Downstate Medical Center, 1957. 

Thenton D. Boaz, Clinical Assistant Professor; M.D., George Washington University, 1929. 

David A. Braver, Instructor; B.S.. Ohio State University, 1957; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1963. 

Carl R. Cavonius, Research Assistant Professor; B.A., Wesleyan University, 1953; M.S.. 
Brown University, 1961; Ph.D., 1962. 

John J. Creamer, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., New York Medical 
College, 1960. 

Gilbert N. Feinberg, Instructor; Johns Hopkins University, 1955; M.D., University of Mary- 
Land, 1959. 

Samuel L. Fox, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Maryland. 1936; M.D., 1938. 

Julian R. Goldberg, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 1951; M.D.. Universit) 
of Maryland. 1955. 

William M. Hart. Clinical Professor; A.B., Missouri State College. 1937; M.S.. State Uni- 
versity of Iowa. 1939; Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1941; M.D.. Temple University. 1948. 



64 • Faculty 

Leonard L. Kogan. Instructor; A.B., Dartmouth College, 1953; M.D.. University of Mary- 
land. 1957. 

Alfred A. Meisels, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Vienna, 1958. 

Moritz Michaelis, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Wurzburg, 1934. 

Rodney L. Ortel, Instructor; B.A.. University of Pennsylvania. 1957; M.D., University of 
Maryland. 1961. 

Jerome Ross, Instructor; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1957: M.D., University of Maryland, 
1960. 

Stanley S. Schocket, Assistant Professor; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1955; M.D., 1959. 

Pathology 

Harlan I. Firminger, Professor of Pathology and Head of the Department; A.B., Washington 

University, 1939; M.D., 1943. 
John E. Adams. Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1954; M.D., 1956. 
Thomas J. Burkart. Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S., Loyola College, 1949; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1953. 
Robert E. Cranley, Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1956; 

M.D., 1958. 
Russell S. Fisher, Professor of Forensic Pathology and Head, Division of Forensic Pathology; 

B.S., Georgia School of Technology, 1937; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1942. 
Henry C. Freimuth, Associate Professor of Forensic Pathology; B.S., College of the City 

of New York, 1932; M.S., New York University, 1933; Ph.D.', 1938. 
Paul F. Guerin, Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; A.B., Wittenburg College, 1942; 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1945. 
Ali Z. Hameli, Instructor in Neuropathology; Alborz College, Tehran. Iran, 1951; M.D., 

Tehran University, 1957. 
Wilson A. Heefner, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Gettysburg College, 1956; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1960. 
Genovefa Hendrickson, Instructor in Pathology; University of Tubingen, West Germany, 

1952; M.D., University of Munster, 1958. 
William J. Hicken, Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.A., Loyola College, 1954; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1958. 
Howard C. Hopps, Professor of Pathology; B.S., The University of Oklahoma, 1935; M.D., 1937. 
Robert Y. Katase, Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S.. Otterbein College, 1946; M.D.. 

Hahnemann Medical College, 1952. 
Lester Kiefer. Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 

University of Pennsylvania, 1953. 
P. Watson Kime, Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.Sc, University of Wales, 1950; M.B., 

BCH. Welsh National School of Medicine, 1953. 
Howard Levin, Assistant Professor of Pathology; A.B., Bowdoin College. 1954; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1958. 
Richard Lindenberg. Associate Professor of Forensic Pathology; M.D.. University of 

Berlin, 1944. 
Walter C. Merkel, Associate Professor of Pathology; A.B., Dickinson College, 1922; M.D., 

University of Maryland. 1926. 
Justin Parr. Assistant Professor of Neuropathology; B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1954: 

M.D., 1958. 
Selvin Passen, Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.D., 

1960. 
Charles S. Petty, Associate Professor of Foreign Pathology; B.S.. University of Washington, 

1941; M.S., 1946; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1950.' 
Seana W. Quinton, Assistant Professor of Pathology; A.B., Hunter College, 1954; M.D., 

Woman's Medical College, 1962. 
Peter Rasmussen, Associate Professor of Pathology; M.D., Temple University School of 

Medicine, 1952. 



Faculty • 65 

Dexter L. Reimann, Associate Professor of Pathology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1D35; 

M.D., 1939. 
Melvin D. Reuber, Assistant Professor of Pathology; A.B., University of Kansas. 1952; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 
Mitchell Rosenholtz. Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.A., Harvard University, 1952; 

M.D., University of Minnesota Medical School, 1956. 
Robert B. Schultz, Associate Professor of Pathology; A.B.. Whitman College, 1946; M.A., 

Stanford University, 1948; M.D., Yale University, 1952. 
Paul Schweda, Instructor in Forensic Pathology, University of Vienna, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology, Emeritus. 
Werner Spitz, Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; Geneva University, 1950; M.D., 

Jerusalem University-Hadassah Medical School, 1953. 
Charles S. Springate, Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; B.A., State University of 

Iowa, 1957; M.D., Washington University, 1951. 
M. Wilson Toll, Associate Professor of Pathology and Head, Division of Cytopathology; 

M.Sc, McGill University, 1935; M.D., 1940. 
John A. Wagner. Professor of Neuropathology and Head, Division of Neuropathology; 

B.S., Washington College, 1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 
Tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor of Pathology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1930; 

M.D., 1933. 
Howard M. Wisotzkey, Instructor in Neuropathology; B.A., Dartmouth College, 1956; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1961. 
Colin Wood, Associate Professor of Pathology; M.B., Ch.B., Birmingham University, 1946: 

M.D., 1957. 
Robert B. Wright, Associate Professor of Pathology; B.S., Centre College, 1920; M.D., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1924. 

Fellows and Research Assistants and Associates 
Hans Bergmann, Research Assistant in Pathology. 
Mario Descalzi, Fellow in Pathology. 

Pediatrics 

Karl H. Weaver, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Acting Head of the Department, As- 
sistant Dean; A.B., West Virginia University. 1950: M.D.. University of Maryland. 1953. 

Virginia Lee Ault, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; R.N., Union Memorial, 
1945; M.D., University of Vermont, 1959. 

Ruth W. Baldwin, Associate Professor and Director of the Pediatric Seizure Clinic; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1941; M.D.. 1943. 

George M. Bauernschrub, Jr., Assistant; B.S., Loyola College, 1950; M.D., University o\ 
Maryland, 1954. 

Samuel P. Bessman, Research Professor of Pediatrics; M.D., Washington University. 1944. 

Edwin H. Besson. Instructor; B.S., Washington College. 1950; M.D.. University of Mary- 
land. 1954. 

J. Edmund Bradley. Emeritus Professor; B.S., Loyola College, 1928; M.D., Georgetown 
University, 1932. 

Arnold Brenner, Instructor; M.D., University of Maryland. 1960. 

Lester Harold Caplan, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D.. University 
of Maryland, 1940. 

Raymond L. Clemmens, Associate Professor and Director of the Central Evaluation Clinic; 
B.S., Loyola College, 1947; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1951. 

Joseph M. Cordi. Instructor; A.B.. Johns Hopkins University. 1931: M.S.. 1933: M.D.. 1936. 

Robert M. N. Crosby. Instructor; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1943. 

Garrett E. Deane, Instructor; B.S.. Westminster College. 1943: M.D., Washington Uni- 
versity. 1946. 

Jerome Fineman. Assistant Professor; B.S.. University of Maryland. 1930; M.D.. 1933. 

Abraham Harry Finkelstein, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics; M.D.. University of Mankind. 
1927. 



66 • Faculty 

Jacob Frankel, Instructor, Medical Psychology- in Pediatrics; A.B., Boston University, 1954; 

M.A., Boston University, 1959. 
Kurt Glaser, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Lausanne, 1939; M.Sc., University 

of Illinois. 1948. 
Samuel S. Glick, Associate Professor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1920; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1925. 
Howard Goodman. Instructor; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930; B.S., 1932; M.D., 

1934. 
Martin K. Gorten, Associate Professor; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1943; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1949. 
Gary Goshorn, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1955. 
Milton S. Grossman, Associate Professor in Pediatrics; A.B., Harvard, 1947; M.A., Boston 

University, 1948; Ph.D., New York University; M.D., Washington University, St. Louis, 

1957. 
Mary L. Hayleck, Instructor, A.B., Goucher College, 1934; M.D., University of Mary- 
land. 1938. 
W. Alvin Hecker, Assistant; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1955. 
Frederick Joseph Heldrich, Jr., Assistant Professor; B.A., Gettysburg College, 1945; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 
Ray Hepner, Professor of Pediatrics; B.S., University of Chicago, 1941; M.D., 1944. 
Clewell Howell, Associate; B.S., Davidson College, 1919; M.D., University of Maryland, 

1924. 
Robert C. Irwin, Instructor in Pediatrics; A.B., Georgetown University, 1953; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1959. 
Philip J. Jensen, Assistant Professor and Assistant Director Pediatric O.P.D. Clinic; A.B., 

University of Virginia, 1947; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1952; M.Sc., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1960. 
Murray Kappelman, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics; B.S.. University of Maryland, 

1953; M.D.. 1955. 
Thomas J. Kenny, Instructor; A.B., Washington and Lee, 1954; M.A., Peabody College, 

1959. 
Donald F. Klein, Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1949; M.D., Yale University, 

1954. 
Zsolt H. B. Koppanyi, Instructor; Bachiller, Colegio Nacional, Argentina, 1952; M.D., 

Facultad de Medicina, Argentina, 1959; Doctor en Medicina, 1961. 
Richard C. Lang, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1955; M.D., 1959. 
Arnold F. Lavenstein, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1939. 
George A. Lentz, Jr., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Instructor in Physical Medicine; 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Eli M. Lippman, Instructor in Pediatrics and Consultant to the Central Evaluation Clinic; 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D., Long Island College of Medicine, 1940. 
Dora Due Logue, Instructor; A.B., Incarnate Word College, 1953; M.D., University of 

Texas School of Medicine, 1957. 
Richard L. London, Assistant Professor; A.B., University of Cincinnati, 1945; M.D., 

University of Tennessee, 1949. 
James A. Lyon, Jr., Assistant Professor; A. A., Princeton University, 1944; M.D., Long Island 

College of Medicine, 1947. 
John W. Machen, Assistant; A.B., Dartmouth College, 1927; M.D., Georgetown University, 

1933. 
Edward E. Maher, Instructor; B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1954; M.D., Georgetown 

University, 1958. 
G. Bowers Mansdorfer, Associate; B.S., Gettysburg College, 1925; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1930. 
Mary E. Matthews, Assistant; B.S., North Carolina State College, 1936; M.S., University of 

North Carolina, 1945; M.D., 1949. 



Faculty • 67 

Fred R. McCrumb, Associate; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

Norman L. Miller, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.D., 1953. 

Robert S. Mosser, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.D., 1951. 

Paul A. Mullan, Associate; B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952; M.D., University 'of Mary- 
land, 1957. 

Prasanna Nair, Instructor; M.B.B.S., University of Delhi, 1956. 

William A. Niermann, Assistant; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1948. 

Boris O'Mansky, Assistant; M.D., Duke University, 1957. 

William S. Parker, Assistant; B.S., University of Chattanooga, 1947; M.D., University of 
Tennessee, 1951. 

Charles Lee Randol, Instructor; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

Inge Renner. Instructor, M.B.B.S., University of Hong Kong, 1953. 

Antonio M. Rivera, Instructor; B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1947; M.D., State Uni- 
versity of New York, Upstate Medical Center, 1955. 

Hildegard Rothmund, Instructor; M.D., Heidelberg, 1945; Ph.D.,. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

Oakley H. Saunders, Instructor; M.D., Meharry Medical College, 1957; B.S., O.D., 
Northern Illinois College of Optometry. 

Leonard Scherlis, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1942; M.D., 1945. 

Sidney Scherlis, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1934; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1938. 

Gilbert Schiffman, Associate in Pediatrics and Instructor in Physical Medicine; A.B., 
George Washington University, 1947; B.S., O.D., Northern Illinois College of Optometry, 
1949; Ed.M., Temple University, 1955. 

William M. Seabold, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1928; M.D., 1931. 

Bernice Sigman, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

William A. Semton, Jr., Instructor; B.S., William and Mary, 1952; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1956. 

Fred B. Smith, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

Melchijah Spragins, Associate; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1941; M.D.. 1944. 

Alvin A. Stambler, Associate; B.S., M.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Willard E. Standiford. Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1956; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1960. 

Oscar C. Stine, Associate Professor; B.A., Oberlin College. 1950; M.D., George Washington 
University, 1954; Dr.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1960. 

Arnold Tramer, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1949. 

Arnold Vance, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1953. 

Christa D. Ventling, Instructor in Pediatric Research; Matura, Tochlerschule Zurich. 
Switzerland, 1950; M.Sc, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. 1954; Ph.D. (Biochemistry), 
University of Oxford, Great Britain, 1957. 

Stuart H. Walker, Associate Professor; A.B., Middlebury College, 1942; M.D., New York 
University, 1945. 

George H. Wall, Assistant; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1954. 

Raul A. Wapnir, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Research; Bacheler, National College of 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1947; Licensee in Chemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina, 1953; Doctor in Chemistry, University of Buenos Aires, School of Chemistry, 1954. 

William Earl Weeks, Assistant; B.S., Wake Forest College, 1937; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1940. 

Gibson Jackson Wells, Associate Professor; B.S., Johns Hopkins University. 1932; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1936. 

Eric L. White. Assistant; B.S., Howard University, 1949; M.D., 1953. 

J. Carlton Wich, Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., 1943. 

Charles E. Wright, Instructor; A.B., Centre College of Kentucky. 1951; M.D.. Johns 
Hopkins School of Medicine. 1955. 

Robert E. Yim. Instructor; B.S., University of Nevada, 1950; M.D., University of Marvland. 
1954. 

Gino L. F. Zarbin, Assistant; M.D., Universita degli Studi-Milano. 1948. 



68 • Faculty 

Consultants, Pediatric Central Evaluation Department 

Virginia Lee Ault, Instructor. 

George Austin, Orthopedic Consultant. 

Ruth W. Baldwin, Seizure Consultant. 

Rheda Becker. Speech Pathologist. 

Regina Cicci. Speech and Reading Consultant. 

Raymond L. Clemmens, Pediatrician. 

Samuel Fox, Ophthalmologist. 

Kurt Glaser. Psychiatrist. 

John Grant, Pediatrician. 

Arthur Green, Psychologist. 

Karl Green, Pediatrician. 

Milton S. Grossman, Endocrinologist. 

Lyn Hicks, Speech Pathologist. 

Thelma Hilger, Audiologist. 

Barbara Hudson, Pediatrician. 

Eleanor M. Jantz, Clinical Psychologist. 

George A. Lentz, Jr., Pediatrician, Physiatrist. 

Eli M. Lippman, Orthopedist. 

Richard L. London, Allergist. 

Norman L. Miller, Neurologist. 

Prasanna Nair, Pediatrician. 

Douglas Sanders, Pedodontist. 

Robert Singleton, Cardiologist. 

John Strahan, Dermatologist. 

John Young, Urologist. 

Physiology 

William Dewey Blake, Professor and Head of the Department; A.B., Dartmouth College, 

1940; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1943. 
William J. Adelman, Jr., Professor; B.S., Fordham University, 1950; M.S., University of 

Vermont, 1952; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1955. 
Charles A. Barraclough, Professor; B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1949; M.S., Rutgers Uni- 
versity, 1952; Ph.D.. 1953. 
Paul D. Coleman, Associate Professor; A.B., Tufts University, 1948; Ph.D., University of 

Rochester, 1953. 
Abram B. Fajer, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Sao Paulo, 1951. 
Edmund M. Glaser, Associate Professor; B.E.E., the Cooper Union, 1949; M.S.E., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1954; D.Eng., 1960. 
Sheldon E. Greisman, Assistant Professor; M.D., New York University, 1949. 
Amin N. Jurf, Instructor; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1959; Ph.D., University of 

Maryland, 1966. 
Leo M. Karpeles, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of North Carolina, 1941; M.D., 

University of Washington, 1955. 
Jerome K. Merlis, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Louisville, 1933; M.D., 1937; M.S., 

1938. 
Gabriel G. Pinter, Associate Professor; M.D., University Medical School, Budapest, 1951. 
Nathan W. Shock, Professor; B.S., Purdue, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 

1930; D.Sc. (hon.), Purdue, 1954. 
Dietrich Conrad Smith, Professor of Physiology Emeritus. 
Neil Solomon, Associate Professor; A.B., Western Reserve University, 1954; M.D., Western 

Reserve University School of Medicine, 1961. 

Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation 

George Entwtstle, Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation and Head of the 
Department; B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1945; M.D., Boston University, 1948. 



Faculty • 69 

Frederick J. Balsam, Associate in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S.. College of 
the City of New York, 1931: M.D., University of Lausanne, Switzerland. 1938. 

Harle V. Barrett, Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S.. 
Oklahoma State University, 1940; M.S., Kansas State College, 1942; M.D., University of 
Kansas, 1946; M.P.H., Harvard University. 1950. 

C. Gottfried Baumann, Instructor in Preventive Medicine; B.S., Valparaiso University, 
1955; B.S.. University of North Dakota. 1957; M.S., 1959; B.A. (Med.), 1960; M.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1962: M.P.H.. Johns Hopkins University, 1964. 

Alexander S. Dowling, Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine; B.A., DePauw Uni- 
versity, 1925; M.D., Harvard University, 1930. 

Dennis J. Dunn, Instructor in Rehabilitation; B.A., University of Buffalo. 1961: M.S.. 
State University of New York at Buffalo, 1963. 

Eugene V. Farrell, Instructor in Biostatistics; B.S.. King's College. Wilkes-Barre, Pa.. 
1957; M.Sc. in Hygiene, University of Pittsburgh, 1960. 

Judith H. Fine. Instructor in Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.A., University of 
Maryland. 1960; M.S.W.. 1965. 

John E. Gessner, Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., Loyola 
College, 1950; M.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

J. Richard Hebel, Assistant Professor in Biostatistics; B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, 1962; Ph.D.. 1965. 

Maureen M. Henderson, Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
M.B.B.S., Durham University, England, 1949; D.P.H., 1956. 

Marjorie H. Hendry, Assistant in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S.. University of 
Minnesota, 1941; M.D., Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1953. 

Lewis H. Kuller, Instructor in Preventive Medicine; B.A.. Hamilton College, 1955; M.D.. 
George Washington University. 1959; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1964; Dr.P.H.. 
1966. 

George A. Lentz. Jr.. Instructor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.A.. Johns 
Hopkins University, 1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

Florence I. Mahoney. Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S.. 
University of Wisconsin, 1927; M.S., 1930; M.D., Women's Medical College of Pennsvivania. 
1937. 

Theresa M. Novak, Instructor in Preventive Medicine; R.N., Georgetown University School 
of Nursing, 1947; B.S.N. E., University of Maryland. 1958. 

Otto D. Payton, Instructor in Rehabilitation; B.S. (Physical Therapy), Kansas University. 
1958; M.S. in Ed.. Indiana University, 1964. 

Kurt Raab, Associate in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; M.D.. Medical School of 
University of Vienna, Austria, 1955. 

Julian W. Reed, Assistant Professor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1948; M.D., 1952. 

Aubrey D. Richardson, Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
B.S., University of North Carolina, 1944; M.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 

Paul F. Richardson, Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Head, 
Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; M.D., University of Maryland. 1950. 

Jacob Schonfield. Assistant Professor of Psychology in Rehabilitation; B.A., Yeshiva Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 1960. 

Mathew Tayback, Professor of Biostatistics; B.A.. Harvard College, 1939; M.A.. Columbia 
University. 1950; Sc.D.. Johns Hopkins University, 1953. 

Psychiatry 

Eugene B. Brody. Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Department; Director, The Psy- 
chiatric Institute; A.B., M.A., University of Missouri, 1941 ; M.D., Harvard University. 1944. 

Virginia Abushanab, Research Associate; B.S., University of Wisconsin. 1965. 

Saim B. Akin, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; M.D., University of Istanbul. 1954. 

Mary J. Albright, Assistant Professor in Medical Psychology; B.A., St. Mary of the Springs 
College, 1954; M.A., Fordham University. 1956. 



70 • Faculty 

A. Russell Anderson. Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A.. University of Wis- 
consin. 1929: M.D., University of Chicago. 1933. 
Harriett Aronson. Research Associate Professor of Psychology; B.A.. Douglass College, 

1951; M.S.. Purdue University. 1953: Ph.D., 1957. 
Eduard Ascher, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Washington University, 1942. 
Hugo Badel, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D.. University of Cartagena, 1957. 
George Balis, Research Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; M.D., National University of 

Athens, 1954. 
Leo H. Bartemeier, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Catholic University of America, 

1914; M.A., 1916: M.D.. Georgetown Medical School, 1920. 
Norman H. Bradford, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology; B.A., University of 

Minnesota. 1956; Ph.D.. 1964. 
Monique C. Braude, Research Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; Pharmacv Diploma, Uni- 
versity of Paris. 1948: M.S.. Ohio State University, 1954; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1963. 
George P. Brown, Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S.. Howard University 

1940; M.D., 1944. 
Roberl Brown, Medical Psychologist; B.A., Princeton University, 1947; M.A., 1950. 
James E. Carson, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Clemson University, 1947; M.D., 

Medical College of South Carolina. 1952.' 
Raymond L. Clemmens, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry, Associate Professor 

of Pediatrics; B.S. Loyola College, 1947; M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 
Jess Victor Cohn. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1931; 

M.B., 1933; M.D.. 1934. 
Roberto A. Q. Correa, Research Assistant in Psychiatry; Ciencias e Letras, Colegio Pedro, 

Brazil, 1955; M.D., National Medical School of University of Brazil, 1963. 
Joseph R. Cowen, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Chicago and Johns 

Hopkins: M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 
Carol Creelman, Psychiatric Social Worker II; A.B.. Radcliffe College, 1955; M.A.T., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1963; M.S.W.. University of Maryland. 1966. 
Jurema A. Cunha. Research Associate; B.A., Faculdade de Filosofia da Universidade do 

Rio Grande do Sul, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., Instituto de Psicologia da Pontificia University 

(Atclica do Rio Grande do Sul, 1956). 
Nathan M. Davis, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.A., University of Chicago, 1950; 

M.D., University of Chicago, 1957. 
Robert L. Derbyshire. Associate Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry; B.S., University of 

Maryland. 1954; M.A.. 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 
Kay Donahoe, Psychiatric Social Worker; M.S.W.. Catholic University of America. 1960. 
Myron Eichler, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Tulane University, 1950; 

M.D., New York Medical College, 1954. 
Elmar Einberg, Research Associate in Psychiatry; E.E., Netzlers Institute of Technology, 

Gothenburg. Sweden. 1950; B.Sc in England; Degree in Mechanical Engineering, Johns 

Hopkins University, 1962. 
L. Whiting Farinholt, Jr., Professor of Law in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1934; LL.B., University of Maryland, 1940; LL.M., Harvard Law School, 1947. 
Deane Fassett. Director of Psychiatric Nursing; B.S.N., University of Maryland. 1961: 

M.S.. 1966. 
Kurt Rudi Fiedler. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.A., University of Berlin, 1949; 

M.D., 1953. 
Jack D. Findley, Research Associate Professor of Psychology in Department of Psychiatry; 

B.A.. Baylor University. 1950; Ph.D., Columbia University.' 1954. 
Rolfe B. Finn. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D.. Ch.B., University of Otago, N. Z., 

1950; D.P.M., Conjoint Examining Board of England. 1957. 
William N. Fitzpatrick, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S.. Mercer University, 1941; 

M.D., Emory University, 1944. 
Dorothy Forrester. Occupational Therapist; B.S.. Richmond Professional Institute, 1961. 
iRvrNG A. Forster, Jr., Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Loras College, 1954; 

M.S.W., Loyola University of Chicago, 1956. 



Faculty • 71 

Jacob Frankel. Instructor in Medical Psychology; B.A., Boston University, 1954; M.A., 1959. 
Robert Friedenberg, Research Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., Park 

College, 1953; M.S., University of Mississippi, 1956; Ph.D.. University of Connecticut, 1963. 
Kurt Glaser, Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; M.S., University of Illinois, 1949; 

M.D., University of Lausanne. 1939. 
Israel Goldiamond. Research Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A.. Brooklyn 

College, 1942; Ph.D.. University of Chicago, 1955. 
Harry Goldmann, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1916. 
Bernard S. Gordon, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., University of Michigan. 1937; 

M.D.. University of Louisville. 1942. 
Kurt Gorwitz, Assistant Professor of Biometrics in Psychiatry; B.S.A.. City College of 

New York, 1950; M.S. Columbia University, 1955; M.P.A., Syracuse University, 1955. 
Robert G. Grenell, Professor of Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B.S., College of the City of 

New York, 1935; M.S.. New York University, 1936; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1943. 
Alfred Gross, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology; B.S.S.. Citv College of New 

York, 1949: M.S.. 1953; Ph.D.. Adelphi University, 1962. 
Gertrude M. Gross. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D.. Basel University, 1935. 
Herbert Gross, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yeshiva College. 1956; M.D., Albert 

Einstein College of Medicine, 1960. 
Martin Gross, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; M.D., University of Hamburg, 1924. 
George A. Gutches. Jr.. Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work; B.S., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1959; M.S.W., University of Maryland. 1964. 
Kamalavathy Harris, Research Associate in Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B.A., M.A., 

University of Madras, India, 1944. 
William M. Harris. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B.. University of West Virginia. 

1941; M.D.. University of Maryland, 1943. 
Joyce Hartl, Instructor in Activity Therapy in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Puget Sound. 

1956. 
Jerome Hartz, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yale University. 1933: M.D.. 

Johns Hopkins University, 1937. 
Hidebumi Hazama, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B.M.. Kvushu Uni- 
versity, 1955: D.M., 1961. 
Myra Herbert. Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work; A.B.. Douglass College. Rutgers 

University, 1955; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1965. 
Irene L. Hitchman. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S.. Maedchen Realgymnasium. 

1927; M.D.. University of Innsbruck, 1933. 
William Holden, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., Marquette University, 1948; M.D., 

1952. 
William L. Holder. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B.. Emory University. 1949; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1953. 
Virginia Huffer, Associate Professor of Psychiatry; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1940; 

M.D.. 1950. 
Barbara Hulfish, Clinical Instructor in Neurology in Psychiatry; B.A.. American University, 

1944; M.D.. University of Rochester. 1952. 
Wayne Jacobson, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S.. Willamette University, 

1945; M.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. 1949. 
Eleanor Jantz, Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1953; M.A., 1957; Ph.D.. 1959. 
Daniel F. Johnston. Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B.. Princeton University, 1952: 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 
Gerald D. Klee, Associate Professor of Psychiatry; M.D.. Harvard University, 1952. 
Werner A. Kohlmeyer, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; M.D., University of Goettingen. 

1942; Pipl. in Psychiatry. McGill University, 1953. 
Morton Kramer, Lecturer in Epidemiology in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1934; Sc.D.. 1939. 
Morton D. Kramer, Research Associate in Psychiatry; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1950; 

M.D.. 1955. 



72 • Faculty 

Lawrence S. Kubie, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B.. Harvard, 1916; M.D., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1921. 
Albert Kurland, Lecturer in Psychiatric Research; B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 

1940. 
Ephraim T. Lisansky, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
Leon A. Levin, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1952; M D 

1956. 
Harvey A. Lewis, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Manhattan College, 1952; M.D., 

Georgetown University, 1956. 
James B. Mackie, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., University of 

Utah, 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 
William W. Magruder, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Mississippi State 

College, 1942; M.D., Duke University, 1944. 
Selma Markowitz, Director of Community Relations; B.S., Syracuse University, 1941. 
Anabel Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., University of 

Maryland, 1933; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania, 1938. 
Cecelia McCue, Assistant Professor in Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., West Virginia Uni- 
versity, 1929; M.A., University of Chicago, 1950. 
Evelyn McElroy, Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, Division of Community Psychiatry; B.S., 

University of Colorado, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 
John D. McQueen, Research Consultant in Neurosurgery, Neurobiology Laboratory; M.D., 

University of Toronto, 1946; M.A., 1950. 
Russell R. Monroe, Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Yale University, 1942; M.D., 1944. 
Thurman Mott, Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.D., 1952. 
Mineko Nakazawa, Research Associate in Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B. A., Goucher College, 

1965. 
Joseph Noshpitz, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., University of Louisville, 

1943; M.D., 1945. 
Jean C. O'Connor, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; 

M.D., 1954. 
Anatol H. Oleynick, Clinical Instructor in Neurology in Psychiatry; B.A., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1952; M.D., University of Chicago School of Medicine, 1956. 
Ruth Oppenheimer, Clinical Instructor in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., Birk- 

beck College, University of London, 1953. 
Mark Ozer, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology in Child Psychiatry; A.B., Harvard, 

1953; M.D., Boston University School of Medicine," 1957. 
Frederick E. Phillips, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.S., Eveleth Junior College, 

1941; M.D., Wayne University, 1946. 
Addison Pope, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Howard University, 1948; M.D., 

Meharry Medical College, 1957. 
Benjamin Pope, Professor of Medical Psychology; B.S., University of Manitoba, 1955; 

B.Ed., 1941; Ph.D., University of California, 1950. 
Leonard Press, Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1952; M.S.S.A., Western Reserve University, 1957. 
Roland Queene, Teacher III; B.S., Maryland State Teacher's College, 1951; M.Ed., Loyola 

College, 1962. 
Naomi Rae-Grant, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; M.B., B.S., University of 

London, 1952; D.P.M., 1958. 
Francis T. Rafferty, Jr., Professor of Psychiatry, Director, Child Psychiatry; B.S., St. 

Mary's College; M.D., St. Louis University, 1948; M.S., University of Colorado, 1953. 
Jack Raher, Research Associate Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1943; 

M.S., University of Cincinnati, 1948; M.D., University of Geneva, Switzerland, 1953. 
Robin Ramsey, Rehabilitation Therapist. 
Jonas Rappeport, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1950; M.D., 1952. 






Faculty • 73 

Julian W. Reed, Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1948; 

M.D.. 1952. 
Kent E. Robinson, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., University of Cincin- 
nati, 1943; M.D., 1947. 
Eduardo Romero, Research Associate in Neurobiology in Psychiatry; A.B., Instituto D.F. 

Sarmiento, 1955; M.D., National University of Cordoba, Argentina, 1963. 
Morris Roseman, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.S., University 

of Maryland, 1942; M.A., 1943; Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 
Lawrence Sack, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., Harvard, 1956; M.D.. 1960. 
Constantine J. Sakles, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., University of Rochester, 

1955; M.D., Yale University School of Medicine, 1959. 
Irene Sard ana, Psychiatric Social Worker I; B.S., Ohio Northern University, 1959; M.S.W., 

Howard University, 1961. 
Lindbergh S. Sata, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Director, Division of Community 

Psychiatry; B.S.. University of Utah, 1951; M.D., University of Utah College of Medicine, 

1958; M.S., 1964. 
Charles Savage, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yale University, 1939; 

M.S., University of Chicago, 1943; M.D., 1945. 
Carl B. Schleifer, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University of Florida. 

1950; M.D., Emory University, 1955. 
Henry Schmuff, Occupational Therapist; B.S.A., Maryland Institute of Art, 1963. 
Nathan Schnaper, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Washington College, 

1940; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 
Miriam Schneider, Consultant in Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Hunter College, 1939; 

M.S.W., Columbia University, 1946. 
Jacob Schonfield, Assistant Clinical Professor in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., 

Yeshiva University, 1950; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; Ph.D., University of 

Chicago, 1960. 
Clarence Schulz, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D., Washington University, 1945. 
John Shaffer, Research Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.S., Pennsylvania 

State University, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957." 
Bernard Shochet, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry; B.S.. University 

of Maryland, 1952; M.D., 1954. 
Aaron W. Siegman, Research Associate Professor of Medical Psychology; B.A., City College 

of New York, 1952; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1954; Ph.D., Columbia University, 

1957. 
Jerome Styrt, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S.. University of Chicago, 1940; M.D., 

1945. 
Carl Thistel, Instructor in Social Work, Division of Community Psychiatry; B.A., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1960; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1965. 
Robert E. Trattner, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; D.D.S., Western Reserve University. 

1945; A.B., 1947: M.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 
Isadore Tuerk, Associate Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S.. Johns Hopkins University. 

1930: M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 
Ulku Ulgur, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; M.D., University of Istanbul, 1959. 
Kersley Vauls, Rehabilitation Therapist; B.S., Morgan State College. 1958. 
Robert M. Vidaver, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., Columbia University 

1953; M.D., State University of New York, 1956. 
Lutz H. von Muehlen, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry: B.S., University of Frankfurt. 

1954; M.D.. University of Munich, 1958. 
Frances J. Warthen, Research Assistant Professor of Biometrics in Psychiatry; B.S., 

Southern Methodist University, 1959; M.S.N.. Catholic University of America. 1961: 

Ph.D.. 1964. 
Walter Weintraub, Associate Professor of Psychiatry; B.A.. New York University, 1948: 

M.D., University of Geneva. 1951. 
Maxwell N. Weisman, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.A.. College of Cit) of New York, 

1930; M.A., Columbia University, 1931; M.D., University of Amsterdam, 1958. 



74 • Faculty 

Otto A. Will. Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B.. Stanford University. 1933; M.D.. 1940. 
Karl Wilson, Teacher III, Child Psychiatry Service; B.S.. Morgan State College, 1954; 

M.Ed.. Loyola College. 1965. 
Kathleen Wise. Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., Wheaton College, 1963; M.S.W.. 

Florida State University. 1965. 
SAMUEL P. Wise, Research Associate in Psychiatry; A.B.. Emory University. 1941: M.D.. 

Tulane University, 1946. 
Imogene Young, Associate Professor of Psychiatric Social Work; B.A.. Sophie Newcomb 

College. 1933; M.S.W., Tulane University'. 1935. 

Radiology 

John Murray Dennis. Professor of Radiology and Head of the Department; B.S., University 

of Maryland. 1943; M.D.. 1945." 
Leslie Larry Allen. Instructor; M.D., University of Glasgow, Great Britain, 1943. 
Fernando Germano Bloedorn. Professor of Radiology and Head, Division of Radiation 

Therapy; M.D., University del Litoral. Rosario. Argentina. 1936. 
Charles Nuckols Davidson, Professor of Clinical Radiology; M.D., University of Virginia, 

1938. 
John Berkley Hearn. Associate Professor; M.B., B.S.. Middlesex Hospital. London, 1947; 

D.M.R.D.. 1952; F.F.R., 1955. 
Nathan Bernard Hyman, Instructor; M.D.. University of Maryland. 1946. 
Gaylord Shearer Knox. Associate Professor; M.D., Tulane University, 1951. 
James Alfred Lyon, Jr., Associate Professor; A. A.. Princeton University, 1944; M.D., 

Long Island College of Medicine, 1947. 
Efrain Navarro, Instructor; B.M., Universidad Autonamade Mexico, 1953. 
Mark David Reiss, Assistant Professor; A.B., Syracuse University. 1955; M.D.. Albert 

Einstein College of Medicine. 1959. 
James Eugene Robinson, Associate Professor of Radiology and Head, Section of Physics 

and Radiobiology; B.S.. Utah State Agricultural College, 1947: M.A., Washington University, 

1949: Ph.D., 1955. 
Gunter Horst Seydel. Assistant Professor; M.D.. University of Frankfurt, Germany. 1955; 

M.S.. Wayne State University College of Medicine. 1961. 
William Nathanil Thomas, Instructor, M.D., University of Virginia. 1942. 
Barbara Anne Threatt. Instructor; B.A., Winthrop College, 1957; M.D.. Medical College 

of South Carolina. 1961. 
William H. Wallop, Instructor; A. A., Princeton University, 1949: M.D.. Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1949. 
Morris Joseph Wizenberg, Assistant Professor; M.D.. University of Toronto, 1953. 
Donald Anthony Wolfel, Associate Professor; B.S.. University of Maryland, 1949; M.D., 

1952. 

Surgery 

Robert William Buxton, Professor of Surgery and Head of the Department; A.B., Kansas 

University, 1931; M.D., 1936; M.S., University of Michigan, 1943. 
George A. Abeshouse. Instructor in Urology; A.B.. Yale University, 1952; M.D., University 

of Maryland. 1956. 
Robert Calvin Abrams, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B.. Johns Hopkins University, 

1935; M.D., 1939. 
Thurston R. Adams, Associate Professor of Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 
George Carl Alderman, Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1952. 
James Givens Arnold, Jr., Professor of Neurological Surgery and Head Division of 

Neurological Surgery; B.A., University of North Carolina, 1925; M.D., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1929. 
Safuh Attar, Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery; B.A., Makassed College, 1943; 

M.D., American University, Beirut, Lebanon. 1947. 



Faculty • 75 

George N. Austin, Professor and Head Division of Orthopedic Surgery, B.A. University 

of Oklahoma, 1940; M.D. University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, 1950. 
Arthur Baitch, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1954. 
Henry V. Belcher, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., University of Virginia, 1948; M.D., Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, 1952. 
Robert Z. Berry, Associate in Otolaryngology; B.A., University of West Virginia, 1941; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1943. 
Harold Paul Biehl, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Western Maryland College, 1936; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1940. 
Cyrus L. Blanchard, Professor of Otolaryngology and Head, Division of Otolaryngology; 

B.A., Clark University, 1943; M.D., George Washington University, 1946. 
Harry Clay Bowie, Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1932; M.D., 

1936. 
Otto Charles Brantigan, Professor of Surgery; B.S., Northwestern University, 1931; 

M.D., 1934. 
Henry Alison Briele, Associate in Postgraduate Surgery; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 

1931; M.D., 1939. 
Harold Bubert Burns, Associate in Surgery; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1938; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1936. 
Edward W. Campbell, Jr., Instructor in Urology; A.B., Amherst College, 1954; M.D., 

Hahnemann Medical College, 1958. 
Michele T. Cerino, Instructor in Thoracic Surgery; M.D., University of Pisa Medical School, 

1955; M.S., McGill Universitv. 1963. 
Regina L. Cicci, Instructor in Speech Pathology; B.S., Kent State University, 1960; M.A., 

Northwestern University, 1961. 
Francis Alden Clark, Jr., Instructor in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 
R. Adams Cowley, Professor of Thoracic Surgery and Head, Division of Thoracic Surgery; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 
Everard F. Cox, Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of Utah, 1951; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1955. 
Robert M. N. Crosby, Associate in Neurological Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 

1943. 
Richard J. Cross, Associate in Otolaryngology; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 1943; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1946. 
Raymond M. Cunningham, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; University 

of Maryland, 1939. 
Michael L. DeVincentis, Instructor in Surgery; B.S., Loyola College, 1937; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1941. 
Liebe Sokol Diamond, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Smith College, 1951; M.D., 

University of Pennsylvania, 1955. 
Konstantinos G. Dritsas, Research Instructor; M.D., Aristotelion University of Salonica, 

Greece, School of Medicine. 
William Charles Dunnigan, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1931; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1935. 
Carol Richman Dwin, Speech Therapist; B.A., University of Maryland, 1963; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1965. 
Frank Philip Dwyer, Jr., Assistant in Otolaryngology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 
Milton L. Engnoth, Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 

M.D., 1957. 
William C. Esmond, Assistant Professor in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland. 1940 

M.D., 1951. 
Margaret M. Fletcher, Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of Michigan, 1957 

M.D., University of Michigan, 1961. 
C. Thomas Flotte, Associate Professor of Surgery; B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 

1943; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1946. 



76 • Faculty 

Earl Potter Galleher, Assistant Professor of Urology; A.B., Princeton University, 1949; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1953. 

William Lynnewood Garlick, Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery; A.B., Emory Uni- 
versity, 1933; M.D., George Washington University, 1937. 

Jason H. Gaskel, Associate in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1930; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

James J. Gerlach, Assistant in Otolaryngology; A.B., Colorado College, 1943; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1946. 

Robert Bruce Goldstein, Instructor in Urology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

George Govatos, Assistant Professor of Surgery; A.B., Boston College, 1926; M.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1930. 

George Herbert Greenstein, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

John S. Haines, Assistant Professor of Urology; A.B., Washington and Lee University, 
1934; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

Leonard Gerard Hamberry, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1940; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950. 

Donald B. Hebb, Assistant in Surgery; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, Associate in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1927; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1931. 

Charles Morgan Henderson, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1955; M.D., 1957. 

Thelma Hilger, Instructor in Audiology; B.A., University of Iowa, 1950; M.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1952. 

William Addison Holbrook, Assistant in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 
1945. 

T. Brannon Hubbard, Jr., Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.A., Princeton University, 
1938; M.D., Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1952. 

Harry Clay Hull, Professor of Clinical Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 

Benjamin Herbert Isaacs, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 

Everett D. Jones, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., Western Maryland College, 1938; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Clyde F. Karns, Instructor in Surgery; B.S., St. John's College, 1922; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1927. 

Leila Rae Kirkley, Instructor in Audiology; B.S., Ball State University, 1963; M.A., 
Northwestern University, 1964. 

Edward Andrew Kjtlowski, Clinical Professor of Plastic Surgery; B.S., Bucknell University, 
1917; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 

Howard Calvin Kramer, Instructor in Urology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Henry E. Langenfelder, Assistant in Surgery; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1947; M.D., 
Hahnemann Medical College, 1951. 

John Douglas LeBouvier, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., London University, 
1952; M.B., 1952. 

Eugene Joseph Linberg, Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery; A.B., Duke University, 
1944; M.D., 1948. 

F. Ford Loker, Associate in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; M.D., 1940. 

William B. Long, Associate in Postgraduate Surgery; B.S., Princeton University, 1940; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

William Dawson Lynn, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., University of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 
1937. 

Arlie R. Mansberger, Jr., Associate Professor of Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

Howard Brooks Mays, Assistant Professor of Urology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

Howard B. McElwain, Assistant in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1919. 



Faculty • 77 

Joseph S. McLaughlin, Assistant Professor in Thoracic Surgery; B.S., Loyola College, 

1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 
Karl Frederick Mech, Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1932: 

M.D., 1935. 
John E. Miller, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1938; M.D., Jeffer- 
son Medical College, 1942. 
Joseph M. Miller, Associate in Surgery; A.B., Columbia University, 1931; M.D., University 

of Minnesota, 1939. 
Kirk Moore, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Princeton University, 1941; M.D., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1944. 
Thomas H. Morgan, Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, M.B., Cambridge University, 

1943; M.D., University College Hospital, Medical School, London, 1945. 
William H. Mosberg, Jr., Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery; B.S., University of 

Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1944. 
Ralph D. Natale, Instructor in Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1955; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 
James Wharton Nelson, Professor of Clinical Surgery; A.B., St. John's College, 1918; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1925. 
Neil Novin, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., New York University, 1951; M.D., State Uni- 
versity of New York, 1955. 
Thomas R. O'Rourk, Professor of Otolaryngology; M.D., University of Maryland, 1921. 
Frank Joseph Otenasek, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1933; 

M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1937. 
Daniel James Pessagno, Professor of Clinical Surgery; B.A., Rock Hill College, 1916; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1920. 
Patrick Carey Phelan, Jr., Associate in Surgery; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1942. 
Ross Z. Pierpont, Assistant in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.D., 1940. 
Harry Primrose Porter, Assistant in Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1939; M.D., 1943. 
James Richard Powder, Instructor in Urology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University. 1949; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 
William Benjamin Rever, Jr., Associate in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 
John David Rosin, Associate in Surgery; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1938; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1942; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952. 
C. Parke Scarborough, Clinical Associate Professor of Plastic Surgery; B.S., Pennsylvania 

State College, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
Irving Scherlis, Assistant in Urology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1940; M.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1943. 
Theodore Allison Schwartz, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology; Ph.G., University of 

Maryland, 1930; B.S., 1932; M.D., 1934. 
William Booth Settle, Associate in Surgery; A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1930; M.D., 

1933. 
John Oliver Sharrett, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 

1952. 
Arthur George Siwinski, Assistant Professor of Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
Edwin Harvey Stewart, Jr., Associate in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland. 1943. 
Frederck Louis Stichel, Jr., Assistant in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1934; M.D., 1944. 
William Joseph Supik, Associate in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1940; M.D., 1940. 
John J. Tansey, Associate in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Brown University, 1942; M.D.. 

University of Maryland, 1945. 
Norman Tarr, Instructor in Surgery; B.S., Washington College, 1944; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1948. 



78 • Faculty 

Raymond K. Thompson, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1937; M.D., 1941. 

W. Houston Toulson, M.D., Professor of Urology, Emeritus. 

Allen Fiske Voshell, Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1915; M.D., 1919. 

William Wallace Walker, Associate Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of West Vir- 
ginia, 1921; M.D., University of Maryland, 1923. 

Israel Howard Weiner, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1949; M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Harold R. Weiss, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; 
M.D., 1954. 

Edward F. Wenzlaff, Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Columbia College, 1948; M.D., 
University of Buffalo, 1954. 

John P. White III, Instructor in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Alfred K. Wiedman, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; M.D., University of Heidelberg, 1956. 

Hans R. Wilhelmsen, Instructor in Plastic Surgery; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1955; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 

David Redd Will, Instructor in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Surgery, Emeritus. 

George Herschel Yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery; B.S., University of West Virginia, 
1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1929. 

John David Young, Jr., Professor of Urology and Head, Division of Uro logical Surgery; 
B.A., Bridgewater College, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology, Emeritus. 

Consultants, Fellows, Research Fellows, and Research Assistants 

Ilse H. Hawthorne, Research Assistant in Thoracic Surgery. 

Amir H. Khazei, Research Instructor in Thoracic Surgery. 

William H. Kirby, Jr., Research Associate in Thoracic Surgery. 

David N. Kramer, Research Associate in Surgery. 

El wood La Brosse, Research Associate Professor in Thoracic Surgery. 

Ceslovas Masaitis, Research Associate in Thoracic Surgery. 

Paulo P. Mendonca, Research Associate in Urology. 

Robert M. Ollodart, Research Associate in Surgery. 

Dorcas H. Padget, Research Associate in Neurosurgery. 

Zouheir Shama, Research Fellow in Thoracic Surgery. 

Chawalit Suddhimondala, Research Fellow in Thoracic Surgery. 

Henry B. Tingey, Consultant-Biostatistician in Thoracic Surgery. 

Lecturers 
James L. Beeby 
Harlan W. Nietfeld 
John P. O'Reilly 



Organization of the Curriculum 
and Courses of Instruction 



Anatomy 81 

Anesthesiology 83 

Art as Applied to Medicine .... 84 

Biological Chemistry 84 

Biophysics 85 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology . 86 

International Medicine 87 

Medicine 88 

Arthritis 90 

Cardiology 90 

Clinical Pathology 91 

Dermatology 91 

Endocrinology and 

Metabolism 92 

Gastroenterology 92 

Hypertension and Renal 

Disease 92 

Infectious Diseases 93 

Physical Diagnosis 93 

Pulmonary Diseases 93 

Microbiology 94 



Neurology 95 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 96 

Ophthalmology 96 

Pathology 97 

Neuropathology 98 

Forensic Pathology 98 

Pediatrics 99 

Physiology 99 

Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 102 

Physical Medicine 102 

Psychiatry 103 

Radiology 104 

Surgery 105 

General Surgery 105 

Neurosurgery 106 

Orthopedic 106 

Otolaryngology 106 

Thoracic 107 

Urologic 107 



79 






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Anatomy • 81 

ANATOMY 

Professors: figge (head of department), brantigan, krahl, and leveque. 

Associate Professors: crispens, mech, and walker. 

Assistant Professors: polley, rams ay, rennels, settle, wadsworth. and wells. 

Lecturer: hearn. 

Instructors: bulmash, donati, linhardt, masters, mcfadden, and novin. 

Associate: bow ie. 

Anat. 101. Gross Anatomy. (187) 

First year, second semester. The course gives the student an opportunity to develop 
a basic concept of the morphology of the human body. The dissecting experience for 
each student will be limited to the back, central nervous system, the thorax, abdomen 
and pelvis. The dissection of the head and extremities will be done simultaneously and 
involve cross-demonstrations of structures. Some lectures will be devoted to roentgen 
anatomy and some to practical clinical aspects of anatomy. 

Anat. 102. Microanatomy. ( 187) 

First year, first semester. The course presents an integrated study of the histology and 
embryology of the human body. Near the end of the semester, the human infant will 
be dissected as a continuation of the course in embryology. Insofar as possible, the 
course will be correlated with the neurosciences course and with biochemistry and 
physiology. 

Anat. 103. Neurological Sciences. ( 132) 

First year, first and second semesters. This course combines all of the neurological 
subjects taught in all years of the medical curriculum. In the first year it consists pri- 
marily of the integrated course of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with additional 
contributions from neurology, neuropathology, neurosurgery and electroencephalography. 
The structure and function of the central nervous system will be presented simul- 
taneously. The course will involve dissections of the human brain, examination of 
stained microscopic sections of various levels of the brain stem and laboratory ex- 
perience involving the study of functional aspects of the nervous system. 

Anat. 105. Genetics. (17) 

First year, first semester. This course consists of a series of one-hour lectures which 
include a consideration of the principles of genetics, population genetics, biochemical 
genetics, radiation genetics, immunogenetics, and microbial genetics. Special emphasis 
is placed on the importance, understanding, and application of genetics to health and 
disease. 

Anat. 106. Correlative Anatomy. (17) Elective 

Each week during the first year, patients will be demonstrated and the anatomical features 
of the case will be stressed to give the student a concept of the relationship of the 
anatomy to clinical subjects. While there are no examinations in this course the ex- 
aminations in the other courses in anatomy will involve questions on the material 
presented. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are the Master of 
Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

Anat. 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body. (9) 

Same course as Anat. 101, but on a more advanced level. It can be taken b) graduate 
as well as postgraduate students. Laboratory fee, $25.00. (F'gge\ staff) 



Anesthesiology • 83 

Anat. 202. Microanatomy. (6) 

Same course as Anat. 102, but on a more advanced level. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 

(Figge, Leveque, Crispens) 

Anat. 203. Neurological Sciences. (4) 

Same course as Anat. 103, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. 

Anat. 205. Genetics. (2) 

Same course as Anat. 105, but on a more advanced level. (Crispens) 

Anat. 206. Correlative Anatomy. (1) 

Same course as Anat. 106, but examinations will be given. (Figge, staff) 

Anat. 207. Fetal and Infant Anatomy. (2) 

First semester, fifteen periods of three hours each, to be arranged. This course is open 
to graduate students and postgraduates interested in pediatrics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Krahl) 

Anat. 208. Studies on Normal and Atypical Growth. (2) 

Lectures in problems of growth. Two hours per week, time to be arranged. Sixteen weeks. 

(Figge) 

Anat. 209. Morphological Microtechniques. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. The 
aim of this course is to study the theoretical and practical applications of a variety of 
microanatomical techniques and their utilization in research. Time to be arranged. 

(Leveque) 

Anat. 210. Special Problems in Neuroanatomy. (2) 

This course will deal with specific problems in the field of neuroanatomy, depending 
on the interests of the sponsor. It will consist of lectures, seminars, and specific labora- 
tory assignments. (Figge. Staff) 

Anat. 399. Research in Anatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Research work may be taken in any one of the 
branches of anatomy. (Figge, Staff) 

ANESTHESIOLOGY 

Professor: helrich (head of department). 
Associate Professors: gold and staff. 

During the first two years, the Department of Anesthesiology presents several 
lectures in the courses taught by the various preclinical departments. These lec- 
tures are intended to illustrate the application of the basic sciences to the clinical 
practice of anesthesiology. Emphasis is placed upon the physiologic and pharma- 
cologic aspects of preanesthetic medication, choice of anesthesia, and management 
of patients during surgery. 

Anes. 101. Introduction to Anesthesiology. 

Third year. The third year class is given a series of one hour lectures dealing with 
preoperative preparation and inhalation, local and spinal anesthesia. An effort is 
made to correlate the basic sciences with their clinical application. 

Anes. 102. Introduction to Anesthesiology. 

Fourth year. Each senior student spends two weeks in the operating rooms of the 
University Hospital or one of its affiliated hospitals administering anesthesia. Informal 
group meetings are held to emphasize factors affecting the anesthetic management of 



84 • Art as Applied to Medicine; Biological Chemistry 

patients and to discuss pertinent anesthetic problems. The students also attend the 
regularly scheduled staff conferences in Anesthesiology. 

ART AS APPLIED TO MEDICINE 

Thomas M. Stevenson, Jr., Director 

This Department is maintained to supply teaching aids for the School of Medi- 
cine faculty. 

The three primary services are illustration, photography, and offset printing. 

Illustration includes statistical charts, illustrative charts, surgical and clinical 
techniques, and displays. Photography covers surgical and clinical needs, copying, 
photomicrography, and motion pictures. Offset printing is maintained for the 
mass production of copy material. 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professors: adams (head of department) and bessman (part time). 

Associate Professors: emery and pomerantz. 

Assistant Professors: bode, kirtley, and layne (part time). 

Instructors: brown and gryder. 

Associate: chang. 

FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS 

Biochemistry, as an introduction to the later preclinical subjects and to clinical 
studies, is presented within Basic Med. Sci. 102, running throughout the first 
year. During the first semester emphasis is on biophysics, biochemistry, and 
general physiology, whereas mammalian physiology occupies most of the second 
semester. The biochemistry portion of this course is oriented toward mammalian 
metabolism and enzymology, but also stresses general and comparative biochemistry. 
A limited number of formal laboratory exercises are designed to introduce basic 
concepts and techniques in biochemistry. Most of the assigned laboratory time 
will be devoted to tutorial work under a faculty member from one of the par- 
ticipating departments, as described under the first-year program. 

All graduate courses as well as research opportunities are open to properly 
qualified medical students who may enroll either formally or informally. 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The graduate degree offered is Doctor of Philosophy. 

Biochemistry 201. (6) This will include the lectures of the first semester of 
Basic Med. Sci. 102, together with a sequence of approximately 20 lectures given 
in the second semester, representing an interdepartmental (Physiology and 
Biological Chemistry) survey of endocrinology. Formal laboratory exercises are 
those given by Biological Chemistry during the first semester. 

Biochem. 202, 203. Special Topics in Biochemistry (2, 2) A series of faculty 
lectures and/or student seminars on major topics of current biochemical interest. 
Subjects reviewed in 1965-1966 included sugar nucleotides, transaminases, lipid 
metabolism, and enzyme induction and repression. The subject for the first 
semester of 1966-1967 was regulation of enzyme synthesis and activity. 

Prerequisite, Basic Med. Sci. 102, or Biochem. 201 or equivalent. 

Biochem. 204, 205. Seminar (1,1) Reports on current literature or research in 
progress. Prerequisite, same as Biochem. 202, 203. 

Biochem. 399. Research. Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 



BlOPHYSK s • 85 

BIOPHYSICS 

Professors: mullins (chairman of department) and sjodin. 
Assistant Professor: hybl. 

The Department of Biophysies offers graduate courses of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doetor of Philosophy. The study programs 
are flexible and depend on the preparation and interests of the student. Detailed 
requirements are available from the department of Biophysics. 

It is recommended that students studying for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in Biophysics select a minor in either physics, chemistry, or mathematics. 

A number of fellowships are available for beginning students; after the first 
year of graduate study, research assistantships are available. Inquiries should be 
directed to the department; deadline for applications is March 1. 

for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Biophys. 100, 101. Introduction to Biophysics. (3, 3) 

Fall semester, odd years; Spring semester, even years. Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, Math. 18, 19. An introduction to the study of living 
systems applying the methods of physics and chemistry. The cell as a physicochemical 
system and experimental methods for investigation, nerve impulse conduction and 
excitation, the interaction of radiation with living material; the structure and properties 
of muscle tissue, connective tissue, and their proteins. (Staff) 

Biophys. 102. Biophysics of Radiation. (2) 

Fall semester, even years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11. 
An advanced study of the interaction of radiation with living matter and with mole- 
cules of biological interest. Dosimetry problems and some bio-medical applications 
will be considered. (Mullins, Sjodin, Robinson) 

Biophys. 103. Laboratory Techniques in Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, 1967-1968. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Training in the use of radioactive isotopes, 
radioactive counting equipment, and bioelectric measuring instruments applied to the 
study of membranes; viscosity, optical rotation, protein titrations, spectroscopy, con- 
ductivity, as applied to fiber forming proteins. Laboratory fee, $20.00. (Staff) 

Biophys. 104. Seminar in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Seminars on various bio- 
physical topics given by the staff, graduate students, and guest speakers. (Staff) 

for graduates 

Biophys. 200. Advanced and Theoretical Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, odd years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or 
consent of staff. An advanced and critical analysis of experimental findings in terms 
biophysical theory. (Staff) 

Biophys. 201. Membrane Biophysics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, Math. 20, 21. Diffusion 
in and through membranes developed from first principles with special reference 
to problems of ion transport in biological membranes. (Sjodin) 

Biophys. 202. Biophysical Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry, Differential and Integral 
Calculus. The application of physicochemical theory to the methods used to study the 
properties of proteins, nucleic acids, and other macromolecules and their component 



86 • Cell Biology and Pharmacology 

parts, and the properties of the fibers and other biological fabrics derived from these 
macromolecules. The properties of interest will include molecular weight, size, shape 
and charge, intramolecular configuration, and intermolecular interaction. The methods 
of interest will include light scattering, ultracentrifuge, viscosity and other hydrodynamic 
methods, optical rotation and rotary dispersion. (Staff) 

Biophys. 203. X-ray Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures a week. An introduction to molecular structure determination by the 
techniques of x-ray diffraction. Emphasis upon problems arising in structural studies 
of molecules of biological origin. (Hybl) 

Biophys. 205 Colloquium in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, Biophys. 104 or consent of the staff. Colloquia on various biophysical 
topics given by the staff, graduate students and guest speakers. (Staff) 

Biophys. 399. Research in Biophysics. (3-6) 

Required of students planning to take the Master of Science degree or the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in Biophysics. (Staff) 

CELL BIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

Professors: aposhian (head), burgison, krantz (emeritus), and truitt. 

Associate Professor: o'neill. 

Assistant Professors: cascorbi, musser (emeritus), and rudo. 

Pharmacol. 101. Medical Pharmacology. (233) 

Second year. The purpose of this course is to present the interactions of therapeutic 
and other agents with biological systems ranging from isolated enzyme systems 
through more complex systems, including animals and man. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate program in Cell Biology and Pharmacology is designed for students 
seeking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. For students studying for the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, a program is available for continued study and research 
toward a Ph.D. 

Pharmacol. 201. f. s. General Pharmacology. (9) 

Same as 101, for students majoring in pharmacology. Additional instruction and col- 
lateral reading are required. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

Pharmacol. 205. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the amount of work accomplished. 

Pharmacol. 206. Pharmacologic Methods. 

Maximum credits, 4. Credit in accordance with the work accomplished. 

Pharmacol. 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmacodynamics. (2, 2) 

Pharmacol. 209. Biochemical Pharmacology. (2) 

Pharmacol. 210. History of Pharmacology. (2) 



International Medicine • 87 



INTERNATIONAL MEDICINE 



Professors: klimt (head of department), barnett, haley, mc crumb, middle- 
brook, AND NUR AHMAD. 
Associate Professors: Clyde. 
Assistant Professors: baker, george, knatterud, kucharski, and meinert. 

International Centers for Medical Research and Training were created under the 
aegis of the National Institutes of Health in accordance with objectives of the 
International Health Research Act of 1960 (Public Law 86-610, July 12, 1960). 
It was the purpose of this act to advance the status of international health research 
and research training. Congress further expressed the hope that "a program through 
United States universities for the early development of research and research 
training centers with adequate field opportunities for international studies'" would 
be established. This program under the direction of the Office of International 
Research of the National Institutes of Health provided for the establishment of 
a research and research training center at the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine in Baltimore in March of 1961. During the course of the past five 
years, the University of Maryland International Center for Medical Research 
and Training has succeeded in the establishment of domestic and overseas research- 
training programs in Baltimore, Maryland, and Lahore, West Pakistan, with the 
following objectives: 

1. To offer research training in international health problems to American 
physicians and allied professional workers as well as their Pakistani 
counterparts. 

2. To conduct medical and allied research at the domestic and overseas sites; 
the mechanisms for such training. 

3. To create, through scientific endeavors, an atmosphere of mutual under- 
standing and friendship between the host nation and the United States. 

In July of 1963 international health activities of the University of Maryland 
were consolidated under an Institute of International Medicine with depart- 
mental status within the School of Medicine. Under the present administrative 
arrangement, the International Center for Medical Research and Training forms 
the nucleus of the Institute into which other international and domestic pro- 
grams are incorporated. 

The Institute of International Medicine is composed of Divisions of Epidemi- 
ology and Biostatistics, Experimental Pathology, Nutrition, Medical Entomology 
and Ecology, Virology and Rickettsiology, and Clinical Investigation, and derives 
major support in addition from the Departments of Microbiology, Medicine, 
and Pediatrics. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Research Associate program of the International Center provides for 
postdoctoral training in the various disciplines represented within the Institute 
of International Medicine and affiliated Departments of Microbiology, Medi- 
cine, and Pediatrics. In general, the program encompasses three years, two of 
which are spent on a field assignment at the Pakistan Medical Research Center 
in Lahore. 

Upon entry into the program each Research Associate works out in advance 
with his advisor a definitive plan of study and research. Assignment to Divisions 
and appointment to advisors depends upon the candidate's background, interests, 
and needs. The global concept of medicine is emphasized and provision is made 



88 • Medicine 

for more advanced training in specialized aspects of international health. Fol- 
lowing a basic orientation course, each Research Associate proceeds into one or 
another of specialized training areas. During this time he becomes identified with 
one of the Institute's Divisions and begins preceptor type training through the 
mechanism of a research project which also prepares the candidate for field work 
in Pakistan. Postdoctoral candidates with Ph.D., M.D., and D.V.M. degrees enter 
in one of several specialized programs soon after appointment to the program. 
These include infectious diseases-microbiology, nutrition, medical entomology, and 
epidemiology. In many instances overlapping interests will result in combined 
training and joint research projects. In some cases, additional clinical training of 
physician candidates will be considered essential to the success of the overall 
program. 

Applications should be submitted through the Head of the Department. 

MEDICINE 

Professors: woodward (head of department), ellis, krause, t. Morrison 

REVELL, H. ROBINSON, AND V. SMITH 

Associate Professors: bereston, borges, connor, cotter, eastland, ellinger, 

GREISMAN, GUNDRY, HETHERINGTON, HORNICK, KARNS, LISANSKY, W. MORGAN, 
S. MORRISON, PARKER, H. RASKIN, R. ROBINSON, L. SCHERLIS, SCHUBART, 
SIMPSON, M. SNYDER, SOLOMON, SPICER, SPURLING, TIGERTT, WISWELL, AND 
WORKMAN. 

Assistant Professors: beacham, burnett, Carroll, charache, j. cohen, ebeling, 
entwisle, evans, fort, freeman, jacobson, jiji, layne, leach, lee, legum, 
lerner, d. levy, merrill, muller, j. raskin, reiter, s. scherlis, serra, 
shapiro, singleton, s. smith, swisher, wisseman, zieve, and staff. 

Med. 102. Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 

Third year. This course consists of a clinical clerkship on the medical wards of the 
University Hospital or Baltimore City Hospitals for a period of nine weeks. Students 
are responsible, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, laboratory 
examinations, and progress notes of assigned cases. They attend ward rounds and 
conferences in general medicine with the Resident Staff, Attending Physicians, and 
Chiefs of Service. For an additional three weeks students are assigned for work in 
neurology, pulmonary diseases, including tuberculosis and attend special ward rounds 
and teaching conferences in general medicine. 

Med. 103. The Principles of Medicine. 

Third year. A short series of lectures in General Medicine, and Clinical Medicine are 
given to the entire junior class. 

Med. 104. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 

Fourth year. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards of University Hospital, Mercy 
Hospital, and Maryland General Hospital, for four weeks. An additional four-week 
period is spent in the Medical Out-Patient Department where instruction is given 
in General Medicine and the medical specialties. During this tour the senior students 
participate in the workup of chronically ill patients at the Montebello Chronic Disease 
Hospital, and attend consultative rounds in cardiology, infectious diseases, gastro- 
enterology, arthritis, radioisotopes, neurology, hematology, endocrinology, and pul- 
monary diseases on the wards of the University Hospital. 

Selected students who have completed the junior year may take Medicine 104 
during the summer months. Application should be made to the Department Head 
prior to March 1 of the current year. Those students completing the course successfully 
will be assigned elective time during the academic year. This program is designed to 







m c 




90 • Medicine 

foster research for promising students and to provide for more intensive training in 
the fundamentals of clinical medicine. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Students who have completed their junior year are encouraged to seek ad- 
ditional training during the summer months preceding their senior studies. This 
training may be obtained in one of several ways. A limited number of students 
are appointed to Clinical Clerkships on the Medical Wards of the University 
Hospital. In these positions, they are responsible, under supervision, for the history, 
physical examination, laboratory studies, and progress notes of assigned cases. 

In addition, certain of the medical subspecialty divisions provide specialized 
training for students as Summer Fellows during the summer months. The ap- 
plicant is encouraged to apply directly to the Division Head. These fellowships 
enable the student to become acquainted with the various specialized diagnostic 
and research techniques, the clinical problems and therapeutic regimens peculiar 
to each of the medical subspecialties. Summer Fellowships are available in the 
following Divisions: Cardiology, (2 appointments), Dermatology (2 appointments), 
Endocrinology (2 appointments), Gastroenterology (2 appointments), Hematology 
(2 appointments), Renal Hypertension (2 appointments), Infectious Diseases (2 
appointments), Arthritis (1 appointment), Radioisotopes (1 appointment), Pul- 
monary Diseases (2 appointments), and Clinical Physiology (2 appointments). 
Interested applicants should contact the respective Division Head prior to January 
1 of the year in which the fellowship is desired. In many instances a fellowship 
award is made providing remuneration for two or three of the summer months. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

These are available in the various specialties of Medicine. For details see 
specific division. 

The Department of Medicine, for administrative purposes, is divided into ten 
Divisions. Each of these Divisions participates in the major courses taught by 
the Department. In addition, a number of specialized courses and postgraduate 
fellowships are offered by the Divisions. 

Division of A rthhtis 

Doctors: schubart (head of division), kochman, and staff. 

Med. 105. Division Rounds. 

Third year. Elective. 

Med. 105a. Outpatient Clinic. 

Fourth year. Elective. Weekly arthritis outpatient clinics and attendance at weekly 
arthritis seminar and rounds. 

Division of Cardiology 

Doctors: L. scherlis (head of division), antlitz, dembo, Gonzalez, lee, s. 

SCHERLIS, SINGLETON, SWISHER, AND STAFF. 

ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis 

Second year, second semester. The Division of Cardiology participates in presenting 
this course. 

Med. 106. Electrocardiography ( 16) 

Third and fourth years. Elective. This is an introductory course consisting of illustrated 
group lectures and exercises. 






Medicine • 91 

Med. 106a. Outpatient Clinic and Divisions Rounds 

Third and Fourth year. Elective weekly clinic and attendance at rounds. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

These are available to selected postgraduate applicants. The Fellow participates 
in the activities of the Division, including cardiac catheterization, electrocardi- 
ography, phonocardiography, and vectorcardiography. Research Fellowships are 
also available. The fellowship begins July 1st of each year. A financial stipend 
is provided. Application is made through the Head of the Division and must be 
completed by October of the preceding year. 

Division of Clinical Pathology 

Doctors: spurling (acting head of division), jiji, Lancaster, layne, linthicum, 
masters, miller, and sherrer. 

Med. 101. Clinical Pathology. (128) 

Second year. The course is designed to train the student in the performance and 
interpretation of the fundamental laboratory procedures used in clinical diagnosis. 
During the first semester the basic techniques of hematology as well as clinical as- 
pects of blood diseases are taught. Blood group immunology in relation to trans- 
fusion is also covered. In the second semester the performance and interpretation 
of tests used in the diagnosis of renal, hepatic, gastric, pancreatic, and metabolic dis- 
eases are considered. A review, with clinical applications, of acid-base balance and 
electrolyte disturbances is included. Methods of examination of cerebrospinal fluid, 
transudates and exudates are taught. Elements of clinical parasitology complete the 
work in this semester. 

Each student provides his own microscope and blood counting equipment. A com- 
pletely equipped locker is provided for each student. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

Two full-time clinical and research fellowships in hematology are available 
to applicants who have had a minimum of one year internship. A financial 
stipend is provided. Application should be made to the Head of the Division. 

Division of Dermatology 

Professor: h. m. robinson, jr. (head of division). 

Doctors: bacharach, bereston, burnett, ellis, Hollander, j. raskin, r. c. v. 
robinson, shapiro, yaffe, and staff. 

Med. 107. Introduction to Dermatology. 

Third year. Students are given assigned reading on the more common skin eruptions. 
Nine two hour clinical sessions are held for each quarter of the junior class. Individual 
instruction is given by one of the senior staff members emphasizing the pertinent 
aspects of differential diagnosis. 

Med. 108. Practical Exercises in Dermatology. 

Fourth year. Groups of 15 students spend 20 hours in the out-patient department 
where they are given individual instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous 
lesions. Emphasis is laid on the relationship of various eruptions to systemic conditions. 
Instruction is given in mycologic technique. 

Med. 108a. 

Students who take dermatology for the senior elective receive special training in clinical 
dermatology and the basic sciences as applied to dermatology. 



92 • Medicine 

graduate training 

The Division of Dermatology is approved by the American Board of Derma- 
tology for a three year period of training which is required by the Board. This 
consists of instruction in the basic sciences (mycology, bacteriology, histopathology, 
chemistry, and physiology), and instruction in clinical dermatology. Emphasis 
is placed on the relationship of cutaneous lesions to systemic diseases. Residents 
and Fellows spend a part of the training period at the Rosewood School for Re- 
tarded Children, the Baltimore City Hospitals, and in the private offices of the 
members of the staff. Temporary membership in the dermatologic societies is 
provided under the sponsorship of the Division Head. 

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism 

Doctors: connor (head of division), wiswell, workman, and staff. 

Endocrine Clinic— Conference and Rounds. 

Fourth year. Elective. Patients with a variety of endocrine-metabolic diseases are seen 
in the Out-Patient Department every Monday afternoon from 1:30 to 4:00 p.m. This 
is followed by a Conference in which clinical case material is presented for discussion 
with staff members and students actively participating. Every Friday afternoon weekly 
wards rounds are held. Elective periods for concentrated study for 1- to 3-month 
intervals are available for selected students. Summer fellowships for students are 
also offered. 

nuclear medicine 

(dr. workman, head) 

Pharmacology 201. 

Second year. In cooperation with the Department of Pharmacology, a portion of one 
laboratory session is utilized to demonstrate the accuracy of a radioisotope method of 
estimating thyroid function. 

Med. 110. 

Fourth year elective (Conference Nuclear Medicine). 
Postgraduate Fellowships are available to applicants who have completed intern- 
ship and at least one year of residency training. Opportunities for active par- 
ticipation in clinical and research activities are available. Independent research 
investigations are encouraged. A financial stipend is provided. Three full-time 
fellowship positions are available. 

Clinical Pathology 

Second year. In cooperation with the Division of Clinical Pathology two lecture- 
demonstrations are presented emphasizing diagnostic radioisotope procedures useful in 
hematology. 

Division of Gastroenterology 

Doctors: h. raskin (head of division), m. attar, v. smith, wagger, and staff. 

ID. 2. Introduction of Clinical Medicine. 

Second year. The Division of Gastroenterology participates in the presentation of this 
course. 

Division of Hypertension and Renal Disease 

Director: borges; Doctors: lewandowski, young, and staff. 



Medicine • 93 

Med. 110. Conferences on Hypertension. 

Fourth year. Elective. Conferences on pathologic-physiology of hypertensive and renal 
disorders, sites of action of antihypertensive drugs, methods for screening patients with 
hypertension and therapeutic methods in various disease processes. 

Med. 111. Outpatient Clinic and Division Rounds. 

Fourth year. Elective. Weekly clinics and attendance at rounds. 

POSTGRADUATE CLINICAL FELLOWSHIPS 

The Division sponsors two Fellows who receive training in pathologic- 
physiology of hypertensive states, techniques of screening patients and manage- 
ment of hypertensive renal problems. In addition, they participate actively in 
investigative problems. A financial stipend is provided. 

Division of Infectious Diseases 

Doctors: hornick (head of division), l. fiset, m. snyder, togo, and staff. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The Division sponsors four Fellows who receive instruction in laboratory 
techniques and clinical investigation. Fellows participate in all functions of the 
Division, including collaboration in investigative problems. A financial stipend is 
provided. Application is made through the Head of the Division. 

Division of Physical Diagnosis 

Doctor: cotter (head of division) and staff. 

ID. 2. Introduction of Clinical Medicine. 

Second year. The Division participates in presenting this course. 

ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. 

Second year, second semester. This course implements ID. 2. and provides the student 
with bedside instruction in physical diagnosis. Small tutorial groups are formed, each 
under the direction of an instructor. In the first five weeks, experience in physical 
examination of normal individuals is given one afternoon weekly. During the subse- 
quent 12 weeks, students become acquainted with abnormal signs through examination 
of hospitalized patients. For the first five of these 12 weeks the Division of Cardiology 
gives instruction in the physical examination of the heart. Thereafter, sections are 
assigned in rotation to the Division of Neurology and the Department of Pediatrics 
for instruction in these specialties. 

Division of Pulmonary Diseases 

Doctors: SPICER (HEAD OF DIVISION), BLIDE, KERR. MARINE. RAMIREZ-RIVERA, 

rusche, simpson, and staff. 

Med. 113. Clinical Clerkship in Pulmonary Diseases. 

Third year. This 3 week period ol" training is given on the chest ward service and in 
the chest clinic. Students are assigned hospital patients whom the) work up, follow, 
and present at rounds and at conference. Clinic and bedside teaching emphasizes 
development o\^ the technique of the medical examination which is correlated with 
x-ray study. The seminars and conferences emphasize an understanding o( the basic 
processes involved in respiratory health and disease. 

Fourth year. Elective. The chest clinic provides an opportunity for clinical and 
physiologic study o\' patients with chronic bronchopulmonary disease, especiall) chronic 
bronchitis and emphysema. Emphasis during this elective period is placed on develop- 



94 • Microbiology 

ment of understanding of principles and techniques of testing of cardio-pulmonary 
function testing. 

STUDENT FELLOWSHIP 

The service offers three such positions for the support and supervision of 
students throughout their medical school career. These fellowships will provide 
special graded instruction and experience in research methodology, epidemiology, 
physical diagnosis, clinical chest disease, and pulmonary physiology. The individual 
student, during his medical school career, will gradually be introduced to clinical 
medical research so that he may plan and complete a research project during 
this period. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: wisseman (head of department). 

Research Professor: traub. 

Associate Professors: eylar, p. fiset, and m. snyder. 

Assistant Professors: levin, mc crumb, myers, rosenzweig, and staff. 

Microbiol. 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (180) 

Second year, first semester. This course is intended to introduce the student to basic 
concepts of microbial agents and immunologic mechanisms necessary to understand 
infectious diseases, public health, and diseases of immunologic origin. Properties of 
microorganisms are considered in relation to pathogenesis of infections, mechanisms 
of tissue damage and host defense mechanisms. Bacterial, fungal, viral, and rickettsial 
agents are studied in both lecture and laboratory. 

FOR GRADUATES 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
and encourages especially those who wish to enroll in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. 
program. While the degree of Master of Science may be offered in special in- 
stances, priority for research facilities will be given aspirants to the Ph.D. degree. 
These courses are available only by prior arrangement with the Staff. 

Microbiol. 201. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group conferences 
per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course, intended for the serious advanced 
student of medical microbiology, is built upon the framework of Microbiol. 101 
supplemented with advanced readings and laboratory work. 

Microbiol. 203. Microbial Physiology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week supplemented with demonstra- 
tions. By consent of instructor. 

Microbiol. 206, 207. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate students, staff, and guests 
participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of subjects of special interest or 
pertinent to graduate training program. 

Microbiol. 209. Special Topics. 

(Permission and credit arranged individually.) This course provides the opportunity for 
the graduate student to pursue under supervision subjects of special interest not offered 
in other formal courses. 

Microbiol. 210. Advanced Virology and Rickettsiology Lecture. (3) 

This course considers the general properties of viruses and rickettsiae, methods for 



Neurology • 95 

studying them, and finally concentrates on agents of medical importance. Special 
emphasis is placed on the host-parasite relationship, characterization of the various 
viral and rickettsial agents and on biological and ecological factors. Registration 
is by permission of instructor only. The course will be given on the average on alternate 
years in the Spring semester. There are two weekly sessions of 90 minutes each. 
Prerequisite: Microbiol. 201 or equivalent. 

Microbiol. 211. Virology and Rickettsiology Laboratory. (2) 

This course is the laboratory counterpart of Microbiol. 210. It is designed to familiarize 
the student with the major techniques for the study of virus and rickettsial agents, 
and to give him first hand experience with a variety of the more common agents. 
Registration is by permission of instructor only. Because of the limited facilities and 
the nature of the work, it may be necessary to restrict registration in this course ac- 
cording to the following priority: students majoring in medical microbiology, then 
students minoring in microbiology and, finally, others. The laboratory consists of 
two formal sessions per week; however, the nature of the work frequently requires 
additional participation throughout the week. 

Microbiol. 399. Research (for thesis problem). 

Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 

NEUROLOGY 

Professors: NELSON (head of department), merlis, and van buskirk. 
Associate Professors: mayer, ramsey, and teitelbaum. 
Assistant Professors: heck, kramer, and mosser. 
Instructors: hulfish, oleynick, and sutton. 

Neuro. 101. Introduction to Clinical Neurology (16) 

(Second year.) Lecture-demonstrations in neurology are presented, emphasizing cor- 
relation of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the nervous system with clinical 
neurology. 

ID. 3. Neurologic Aspects of Physical Diagnosis. (8) 

(Second year.) The Department participates in the physical diagnosis course with in- 
struction in the performance of the normal neurologic examination as well as ex- 
amination of selected patients with neurologic disorders. 

Neuro. 102. Clinical Clerkship in Neurology. 

Third year. Available for a portion of the third year class. This course consists of a 
clerkship on the neurology ward of the University Hospital for approximately four 
weeks. Under house staff and attending staff supervision, the students are responsible 
for the total care of the patient with neurologic disease. They may assist in the 
performance of some procedures and attend rounds and conferences in neurology. 

Neuro. 103. Practical Clinical Neurology. (10) 

Third year. A series of lecture-demonstrations given to the entire third year class with 
emphasis on diagnosis and treatment of the common neurologic diseases. 

Neuro. 104. 

Fourth year. Elective time of 4 weeks may be spent in the Department of Neurolo^\. 
either on the ward or in one of the research laboratories. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Students who have completed their first, second, or third years and have an 
interest in the neurologic sciences may apply for additional training in clinical 
neurology or in one of the research laboratories of the Department of Neurology. 



96 • Obstetrics and Gynecology; Ophthalmology 
Qualified students may receive remuneration for their summer work. 

POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 

There is a fully approved three year program for specialty training in Neurology 
at the University Hospital. This provides for clinical training as well as a rotation 
through the associated basic science disciplines. Fellowships with a stipend are 
provided and begin July 1 each year. For further information, contact the Head 
of the Department. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Professors: haskins (head of department) and kaltreider. 

Associate Professor: middleton. 

Associate Clinical Professors: cornbrooks and mcnally. 

Assistant Professors: durkan, Garcia, misenhimer, moszkowski, munford, rimer, 

AND VILLASANTA. 

Assistant Clinical Professors: brady, cohen, davis, diggs, dixon, dumler, kardash, 

MARTIN, MORRIS, MORRISON, SEEGER, AND STAFF. 

Instructors: ances, baca, and westney. 

Ob-Gyn. 101. Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Third year. Students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology for a period of six 
weeks. As clinical clerks, they participate in the original diagnostic studies, pelvic 
surgical procedures, and postoperative care of hospitalized patients. 

Daily rounds, seminars, and departmental conferences with the attending staff and 
house officers aid the student in the interpretation and correlation with his observations, 
diagnoses, and the several therapeutic regimens. 

Specific instruction is provided in pathology, basic science, and endocrinology as 
related to obstetrics and gynecology. Obstetrical manikin exercises, prenatal examina- 
tion, and gynecologic outpatient care are accomplished in the Outpatient Department. 

Ob-Gyn. 102. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Fourth year. Students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baltimore City 
Hospital for a period of four weeks. The student rotates through the accident room, 
delivery floor and maternity division. He participates in daily rounds, deliveries, 
postpartum care, and seminars. Specific instruction in cancer, obstetrical complications, 
and pelvimetry is provided. 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Professors: Richards (head of department) and hart. 

Associate Professor: fox and michaelis. 

Assistant Professor: bernstein, boaz. cavonius, meisels, and schocket. 

Instructor: braver, creamer, feinberg, Goldberg, kogan, ortel, and ross. 

Ophthal. 101. Introduction to Ophthalmology. 

Third year. A lecture course for the entire class covers the fundamentals of Ophthal- 
mology. Weekly section work, with emphasis on the use of the ophthalmoscope, in- 
cludes discussion periods, demonstrations, and clinics. 

Ophthal. 102. Clinical Ophthalmology. 

Fourth year. Ward rounds, demonstrations, discussion periods, aid clinics in diseases 
of the eye. 



Pathology • 97 
PATHOLOGY 

Professors: firminger (head of department), fisher, hopps, and wagner. 
Associate Professors: freimuth, lindenberg, merkel, petty, rasmussen, 

REIMANN, SCHULTZ, TOLL, WEINBERG, WOOD, AND WRIGHT. 

Assistant Professors: adams, burkart, cranley, guerin, hicken, katase, kiefer, 

KIME, LEVIN, PARR, PASSEN, QUINTON, REUBER, ROSENHOLTZ, SPITZ, AND 
SPRINGATE. 

Instructors: hameli, hendrickson, schweda, and wisotzkey. 

Path. 101. General, Systemic, and Experimental Pathology. (364) 

Second year. This course starts with the study of the basic principles of pathology and 
progresses with the study of diseases of the various organ systems. Teaching is chiefly 
by the case method using fresh and fixed autopsy cases but also utilizes gross museum 
specimens and a set of prepared, selected histologic slides. Students assist in the 
performance of autopsies in small groups, prepare final protocols, and present the 
findings and interpretation of the cases to others in the class. 

Included in the course is an introduction to experimental pathology by two experi- 
ments illustrative of basic pathologic principles. 

Path. 102. Experimental Pathology. (Hours vary with project chosen.) 
Second year. A limited number of students have the opportunity to participate in 
experimental work. Some carry out a series of 6 experiments selected to illustrate 
the dynamics of disease processes. Others choose some area of the Department such 
as tissue culture, electron microscopy, or cytopathology for seminars and the pursuit 
of an original project under the supervision of a member of the Staff. 

Path. 103. Correlative Medical Pathology. (9) 

Third year. This course is given in collaboration with the Department of Medicine 
and consists of a series of conferences with small groups of students, an internist 
and a pathologist. An illustrative clinical case is used as the base for discussion of a 
few selected diseases with particular emphasis on correlating the anatomical and 
functional changes with the clinical disease. 

Path. 104. Surgical Pathology. (16) 

Fourth year. This course consists of a series of rather informal lectures and discus- 
sions of the pathology of various surgical conditions with small groups of students 
using colored lantern slides, gross museum specimens, a set of prepared microscopic 
slides and current gross surgical specimens. 

Path. 105. Clinical Pathologic Conferences. (36) 

Third and fourth years. These exercises are held in collaboration with various clinical 
departments. Histories from carefully chosen cases are circulated prior to the con- 
ference. Diagnoses are submitted and the differential diagnoses are discussed by 
selected members of the clinical faculty. The pathologic findings are then presented 
and correlated with the clinical disease. 

Path. 106. Elective Pathology. (115) 

Fourth year. Students may spend a month continuously in pathology as an assistant 
to a resident participating in autopsies, examination of surgical specimens, and con- 
tributing to discussions in the various conferences of the Department. 

Path. 107. (56) 

Second year (second semester). A small group of students attend a series of round 
table discussions on the diagnosis of medical diseases by biopsy. The course includes 
microscopic study of the histopathologic findings, their interpretation and significance 
with special emphasis on diseases of the liver and kidney. 



98 • Pathology 

FELLOWSHIPS (AFTER SOPHOMORE YEAR) 

Students may be selected for summer fellowships in pathology or in certain 
instances drop out of the regular curriculum for a year and devote their entire 
time to pathology. They may spend a minor proportion of their time as externs 
in pathology and attending the regular intradepartmental conferences but the 
major part of their time is devoted toward research, with students participating 
in original projects under the supervision of a Staff member. 

Division of Neuropathology 

Doctors: wagner (head of division), parr, and staff. 

Neuropathology is now taught as a part of a newly developed curriculum 
known as the Neurologic Sciences Curriculum. Since 1964, all departments con- 
cerned with the teaching of neurologically related subjects have cooperated in the 
formulation of a single curriculum. All aspects of the neurologic sciences are 
covered in a progressively expanding manner during the 4 years the students 
spend in school. 

Neuropathology is included in the curriculum as follows: 

NEUROLOGIC SCIENCES I: Correlative illustrations are presented as 
their principal anatomic areas are studied. Illustrative material is presented in the 
section on Clinical Anatomical Correlation. 

NEUROLOGIC SCIENCES II: A complete course of basic lectures in 
Neuropathology, demonstrations of typical neuropathologic lesions and clinico- 
pathologic case studies, becomes a continuing integrated aspect of the Neurologic 
Science Curriculum. 

NEUROLOGIC SCIENCES III AND IV: Continued specific correlation and 
periodic reviews of Neuropathology is provided during the clinical years. Formal 
Clinicopathologic Conferences are included. 

Division of Forensic Pathology 

Doctors: fisher (head of division), adams, freimuth, lindenberg, petty, 

SCHWEDA, SPITZ, AND SPRINGATE. 
FOR GRADUATES 

In addition to teaching basic forensic pathology in the second year course this 
division offers a number of other courses including a graduate program in toxi- 
cology leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
Toxicology. 

Leg. Med. 201. Legal Medicine. (1) 

Third year or graduate students. This course consists of one hour of lecture for each 
of 12 weeks and 4 hours of assigned reading. 

Leg. Med. 202. Toxicology. (10) 

Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per week for one year. 

Leg. Med. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to Toxicology. (2) 
Two hours per week for one year. 

Leg. Med. 204. Research in Toxicology Leading to Preparation of a 
Thesis for the M.S. (6) 

Minimum credits, six. 



Pediatrics; Physiology • 99 



FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS 



Normal human physiology is presented in the first year in two different courses: 
Basic Medical Sciences 102, and Neurosciences 101. 

Leg. Med. 205. Research in Toxicology Leading to Preparation of a 
Thesis for the Ph.D. (30) 



PEDIATRICS 

Professors: bessman, bradley (emeritus), finkelstein and hepner. 
Associate Professors: Baldwin, clemmens, glaser, glick, gorten, Grossman, 

S. SCHERLIS, F. SMITH, STINE, WALKER, WEAVER, AND WELLS. 

Assistant Professors: fineman, heldrich, jensen, kappelman, lentz, London, 
mosser, schiffman, seabold, sigman, and wapnir. 

Ped. 101. Inpatient Clerkship. 

Third year. Students are assigned as clinical clerks for a period of six weeks to the 
pediatric wards of the University and Mercy Hospitals. They are responsible for 
patient care and work with house staff and instructors in planning the workup and 
treatment of assigned patients. Ward rounds are attended daily. The students are as- 
signed tutors who meet with their students two times weekly. 

Daily conferences are held covering x-ray diagnosis, cardiology, journal review, 
chart conferences, neonatal mortality, case discussions and metabolic diseases. Dis- 
cussions cover concepts of the premature and neonate, therapeutic management of 
pediatric patients, nutritional aspects and disturbances of the genitourinary tract. 

Ped. 102. Outpatient Department Clerkship. 

Fourth year. Students assigned to pediatrics as clinical clerks for a period of four 
weeks work in the Pediatric Outpatient Department of the University Hospital. All 
patients seen by the students are reviewed by an instructor of the pediatric staff. 
Daily conferences covering a wide range of pertinent pediatric topics are held from 
9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Students are assigned to the Development, Seizure, Pediatric 
Hematology, Cardiology and Child Guidance Clinics. Senior students are responsible 
for physical examinations of all neonates. Field trips to various community agencies 
are offered to selected students. Ward rounds for senior students are held twice 
weekly in the University Hospital. Senior students attend the departmental noon 
conferences. 

Ped. 103. Laboratory Research Problems in Pediatrics. 

Second year. Elective. (Two students per year.) Students will be required to set up 
simple laboratory procedures to be used by them in the study of a clinical problem. 
Problems will be selected of such limited scope that a fairly complete project can be 
done by two students cooperating in their elective time over a period of one year. 
Emphasis will be made on the accuracy and reliability of standard techniques, as 
applied to the detailed analysis of a clinical problem. Interested students should 
apply to Dr. Bessman. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors: blake (head of department), adelman, barraclough, and shock. 
Associate Professors: coleman, fajer, glaser, merlis, pinter. and solomon. 
Assistant Professors: karpeles, and greisman. 
Instructor: jurf. 



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Physiology • 101 

Basic Med. Sci. 102 consists of lectures, laboratory work, and conferences 
running throughout the first year. The lectures cover principles of biochemistry, 
biophysics, physiology, and pharmacology. Laboratory work and the conferences 
thereon include an introductory series of exercises and demonstrations to acquaint 
students with contemporary techniques in these disciplines after which time students 
select an advisor from one of the above departments and continue their labo- 
ratory work on a tutorial basis. 

Neurosci. 101 correlates the study of neuroanatomy with neurophysiology and 
introduces related clinical material in lecture and laboratory work. 

Lectures in abnormal human physiology are presented in the second year in the 
course entitled Introduction to Clinical Medicine. 

Advanced seminars (see below) and/or research in special areas of physiology 
are open to interested students who have completed the first year. 

Combined M.D.-M.S. and M.D.-Ph.D. programs, requiring additional course 
work and original research, are offered for highly qualified students. 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The several graduate programs in Physiology are designed for students oriented 
toward careers in mammalian physiology, biomedical engineering, gerontology, 
or academic medicine. Background in mathematics, physics, and chemistry is 
considered essential and ordinarily only those wishing to complete the require- 
ments for a Ph.D., M.D.-Ph.D.. or M.D.-M.S. degree will be considered. The 
program in gerontology is given in collaboration with the Gerontology Division 
of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the Balti- 
more City Hospitals. The M.D.-Ph.D. and M.D.-M.S. programs are given in 
collaboration with the School of Medicine. Interested students are invited to 
write for additional details. 

Graduate students majoring in physiology will ordinarily be expected to take 
Basic Med. Sci. 202 and Neurosci. 201 and those advanced seminars that are 
pertinent to their areas of interest. Additional course work in anatomy, bio- 
physics, biochemistry, pharmacology, mathematics, and/or physics complete the 
minor requirement. Foreign language examinations are required for Ph.D. 
candidacy and original research and a dissertation for attainment of the degree. 

Advanced courses offered by the Physiology Department include: 

Basic Medical Sciences 202. (6. 8) Similar to Basic Med. Sci. 102 but with addi- 
tional reading and conference work. 

Neurosciences 201. (3, 3) Similar to Neurosci. 101 but with additional reading 
and conference work. 

Physiol. 202. Cardiovascular Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 203. Pulmonary Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2) 

Physiol. 206. Seminar (1 ) 

Physiol. 207. Physiology of the Central Nervous System (2) 

Physiol. 208. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System. (2) 

Plnsiol. 209. General Physiology (3) 

Physiol. 210. Physiological Control Systems. (3) 

Physiol. 211. Sensory Physiology (2) 

Physiol. 212. Physiology of Reproduction. (2) 

Physiol. 213. Seminar in Neuroendocrinology. (2) 

Physiol. 214. Comparative Adrenal Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 399. Research. 



102 • Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION 

Professors: entwisle (head of department) and tayback. 

Associate Professors: Barrett, dowling, Henderson, mahoney, and p. richardson. 

Assistant Professors: gessner, hebel, reed, a. richardson, and schonfield. 

Prev. Med. 101. Biostatistics. (42) 

First year, second semester. Each weekly two and a half hour session is divided into 
a lecture period followed by small group sessions used for review, discussion or 
practical exercises. This series of lectures and small group sessions illustrates the 
basic methods of statistical analysis and demonstrates their use in several areas of 
clinical practice and investigation. The course will cover the following statistical sub- 
jects: Concepts of measurement in medicine, analytical methods for quantitative and 
qualitative data, life table method and application to medicine, age adjustment and 
bio-assay. 

Prev. Med. 102. Epidemiology and Community Medicine. (34) 

Second year, second semester. The basic methods and application of epidemiology are 
reviewed and illustrated by consideration of certain groups of chronic diseases. Pat- 
terns of illness and medical care are discussed, and the role of a variety of health 
agencies is reviewed. 

Prev. Med. 103. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation I. (48) 
During third year the student is assigned a patient with a chronic disease and follows 
this patient and the patient's family, the student serving as a health advisor. During this 
year of practical experience, the student studies in depth the medical care and manage- 
ment of his patient, including the use of community resources, and the community 
distribution and the epidemiology of the specific chronic diseases which his patient 
manifests. This family-based program gives the student an opportunity to understand 
comprehensive medical care. 

In addition, the student participates in small group sessions in the areas of re- 
habilitation, including comprehensive evaluation services, medical care and chronic 
disease. Part of the student's assignment is at Montebello State Hospital. 

Prev. Med. 104. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation II. (18) 
Fourth year. Each student participates in four seminars devoted to broad consideration 
of the application of preventive medicine in general and specialty practice. In 
addition, the student participates in four clinical conferences on rehabilitation prob- 
lems of patients in University Hospital. 



Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Doctors: p. richardson (head of division), dowling, Fleischer, gessner, 

LENTZ, MAHONEY, A. RICHARDSON, AND STAFF. 

The Division participates in Preventive Medicine 103 where the students receive 
lecture demonstrations and participate in small group discussions in the applica- 
tion of physical medicine procedures and rehabilitation techniques in the general 
practice of medicine. Part of this assignment is at Montebello State Hospital. 
The Division also participates in Preventive Medicine 104 with four clinical 
conferences on rehabilitation problems of patients in the University Hospital. 



Psychiatry • 103 
PSYCHIATRY 

Professors: brody (head of department), bartemeier, farinholt, grenell, 

KUBIE, MONROE, B. POPE, RAFFERTY, AND WILL. 

Associate Professors: anderson, Derbyshire, hartz, huffer, jacobson, klee, 

LISANSKY, RAHER, ROSEMAN, SATA, TUERK, WEINTRAUB, AND YOUNG. 

Research Associate Professors: aronson, findley, friedenberg, goldiamond, 

AND SIEGMAN. 

Assistant Professors: akin, Albright, ascher, Bradford, g. brown, clemmens, 

DAVIS, EICHLER, GLASER, GORWITZ, A. GROSS, H. GROSS, M. GROSS, HAZAMA, 
HOLDEN, JANTZ, KOHLMEYER, M. D. KRAMER, LEVIN, MACKIE, MAGRUDER, 
MAXWELL, MC CUE, MOTT, NOSHPITZ, O'CONNOR, OZER, PRESS, RAE-GRANT, 
RAPPEPORT, REED, ROBINSON, SAKLES, SAVAGE, SCHLEIFER, SCHNAPER, SCHON- 
FIELD, SHOCHET, ULGUR, VIDAVER. 

Research Assistant Professors: balis, braude, shaffer, and warthen. 
Instructors: badell, carson, cohn, cowen, fiedler, finn, fitzpatrick, forster, 

GOLDMANN, GORDON, G. GROSS, GUTCHES, W. HARRIS, HARTL, HERBERT, 
HITCHMAN, HOLDER, HULFISH, JOHNSTON, LEWIS, MC ELROY, OLEYNICK, 
OPPENHEIMER, PHILLIPS, A. POPE, SACK, SCHULZ, STYRT, THISTEL, TRATTNER, 
VON MUEHLEN, WEISMAN, AND K. WISE. 

Lecturers: m. kramer and kurland. 

Psy. 101a. Interview Appraisal 

(Thursday afternoons, 1st semester.) Dr. Brody and staff. 

This course is devoted to providing future physicians with a fundamental knowl- 
edge of human relationships. Principals and concepts of role theory, interpersonal 
relations, and psychodynamics provide a frame of reference within which medical 
students examine transactional behavior. Each week a physician-patient interview is 
the medium providing students an opportunity to observe and critically analyze a 
transaction. With the leadership of a staff psychiatrist, students form small groups 
after each interview. These groups focus upon observing the transactional process. 
Lectures prior to each patient interview and assigned readings provide the substantive 
material with which students analyze human interactions. 

Psy. 101 b. Health, Illness, and Human Behavior 

(Thursday afternoons, 2nd semester.) Dr. Derbyshire and staff. 

Behaviors associated with illness and health are incorporated into all social 
systems. Anthropologic, psychologic, and sociologic concepts for examining and under- 
standing the social behavior of health and illness are stressed. Of central concern is 
the life cycle of families. An examination of the family life process through develop- 
mental tasks provides an opportunity for viewing health and illness in relation to its 
social system, role theory, culture, motivation, socialization, values, attitudes, percep- 
tion, reference groups, and institutions. 

Psy. 101c. Life Situations, Emotions, and Illness. 

(Thursday afternoons, 2nd semester.) Dr. Lisansky and staff. 

This course develops a frame of reference for viewing illness of all kinds, emo- 
tional and physical, from the study of adults with a wide variety of medical problems 
Much of the material is developed during the course of classroom interviews with 
patients from the medical and surgical wards. Important issues include: reactions to 
stress, and situational and social factors in disease. Emphasis is placed upon observing, 
understanding, and evaluating the personal and social factors in the disease process, 
in treatment, and in prevention. 



104 • Radiology 

Psy. 102. Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry. Psychopathology and 

Psychotherapy. 

(60). Dr. Monroe and staff. 

This course, Tuesday and Thursday morning during the first semester and Thursday 
morning during the second semester, presents to the sophomore medical students, by 
lectures, films, interviews, and discussions, a foundation in psychopathology. Each of 
the reaction types are discussed with signs and symptoms. There is also a discussion of 
basic defense mechanisms. Psychopathology is also correlated with effects of culture, 
group process, and their relationship to the therapeutic task which will be part of 
the doctor-patient relationship. 

Psy. 103. Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship 

(Third year— 3 weeks). Dr. Weintraub. Dr. Huffer. and staff. 

Students are assigned to two clinical areas. Under the direction of the Liaison 
Division staff psychiatrists, the students work with medical-surgical patients, learning 
the principals and techniques of interviewing, doctor-patient relationship and supportive 
psychotherapy. On the wards of the Inpatient Division, the students are indoctrinated 
into the milieu approach in the treatment of psychiatric patients. In addition, they 
are responsible for the detailed history, examination, and treatment of newly admitted 
psychiatric patients, working closely with the psychiatric assistant residents. The 
importance of family-social influences is stressed. 

Psy. 104. Advanced Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship 
(Fourth year— 4 weeks). Dr. Rafferty, Dr. Klee and staff. 

A clinical clerkship is offered in the outpatient clinics of the Psychiatric Institute 
for one month. The students elect either the adult or children's programs. Emphasis 
is on the clinical management, diagnosis, interviewing technique, and psychotherapy. 
Related theoretical seminars and intensive personal supervision provide support to 
the clinical experience. 

RADIOLOGY 

Professors: DENNIS (head oe department), BLOEDORN, AND DAVIDSON. 
Associate Professors: hearn, knox, lyon. robinson, and wolfel. 
Assistant Professors: reiss. seydel, and wizenberg. 
Instructors: allen, hyman, navarro, thomas. threatt, and wallop. 

Rad. 101. Radiologic Anatomy. (12) 

First year, first semester. A correlated course is given in conjunction with the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy. This course consists of nine lecture-demonstrations devoted to the 
skull, chest, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, the spine, and joints. Not only 
is the normal anatomy shown, but the radiologic aspects of a few pathologic processes 
are also shown for emphasis and correlation. 

Rad. 103. Radiation Therapy Orientation. (5) 

Third year. This series of five lectures is given to the whole third year class to present 
the basis of radiation therapy. In the first lecture, the basic principles of radiotherapy 
and the present and future role of radiotherapy of malignant tumors is presented. The 
second lecture is devoted to the principles of radiobiology, radiophysics and radiation 
protection. The last three lectures deal with groups of tumors that are curable with 
ionizing radiation with a discussion of the principle indications, management and 
results of radiotherapy in each of these groups. 

Rad. 104. Radiologic Orientation I. (33) 

Third year. A series of lecture-demonstrations are given to small groups of students 
at the Baltimore City Hospital, Mercy Hospital, and the University Hospital. An 
attempt is made to cover the roentgen studies of all systems of the body wkh demonstra- 
tions of the more common lesions encountered in each system. At Baltimore City 



Surgery • 105 

Hospital, twelve lecture-demonstrations are given on the chest, the genitourinary 
tract and metabolic bone diseases, while at Mercy Hospital, three hours are devoted 
to the arthritides and bone tumors. At the University Hospital, eighteen additional 
lecture-demonstrations are devoted to the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and skull. 

Rad. 105. Radiologic Orientation II. (60) 

Fourth year. Students in groups of five are assigned full time for a period of two 
weeks to the Diagnostic Division of the Department of Radiology. On alternate 
mornings, a student observes chest and gastrointestinal fluoroscopy, interviews out- 
patients and correlates the clinical and roentgen findings on these patients and attends 
film reading sessions with the staff radiologists. The students are taught the basic principles 
of fluoroscopy and are assigned a few patients with pulmonary and cardiac lesions 
to fluoroscope. Recommended reading assignments are made and the students spend 
the afternoons studying a select group of teaching cases which are correlated with 
these reading assignments. Daily diagnostic conferences are held with the students, 
and at this time the interesting cases of the day are presented. They also attend joint 
conferences held with the department of Pediatrics, and the Division of General and 
Thoracic Surgery. 

SURGERY 

Professors: buxton (head of department), austin, blanchard, cowley, hull, 

YEAGER, AND YOUNG. 

Associate Professors: adams, attar, flotte, linberg, mansberger, mosberg, 

SCARBOROUGH, AND THOMPSON. 

Assistant Professors: bowie, cox, govatos, hubbard, mays, mech, Schwartz, 
siwinski, and staff. 

Surg. 101. Principles of Surgery. (25) 

Third year. These lectures are discussions of fundamental surgical problems and a 
systematic description of general surgical disease. The discussions are designed as 
introductions to and preparation for detailed reading in standard textbooks, current 
periodicals, and monographs in surgery. 

Surg. 101a. Surgical Specialty Lectures. (42) 

Third year. This is a continuation of Surg. 101, wherein the surgical discussions center 
around the problems of Otorhinolaryngology. Thoracic Surgery. Neurosurgery, 
Orthopedic Surgery, and Urologic Surgery. 

Surg. 103. Outpatient Clerkship in Surgery. (286) 

Third year. One-fourth of the third year class is assigned to the Department of Surgery 
each quarter of the school year. Students are assigned to the Outpatient Department 
for the examination and supervised care of patients in the General Surgical, Orthopedic, 
Urologic, and ENT Clinics. One-third of this quarter is spent at Mercy Hospital. 
Students are assigned in rotation as clinical clerks at night in the Emergency Room. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Fellowships are available each summer for a period of ten weeks in the Surgical 
Research Laboratory. Both sophomore and junior students are eligible. In- 
vestigative problems related to these services will be undertaken under the guidance 
of members of the Surgical Staff. 

Division of General Surgery 

Doctors: adams, bowie, buxton, cox, flotte, govatos, hubbard, hull. 

MANSBERGER, OLLODART, SCARBOROUGH, SIWINSKI. STEWART, YEAGER, AND 
STAFF. 



106 



Si'RCii m 



Surg. 103a. 

This is the student's introduction to an office-type surgical practice in that he under- 
takes the supervised care of patients in the Surgical Dispensary. General discussions 
related to problems presented by these patients are given by the Surgical Staff. The 
introduction to specific surgical techniques in examination and treatment of patients 
is undertaken. This course is given at both University and Mercy Hospitals. Audio- 
visual instruction is given. Students are assigned to the Emergency Room during this 
period. 

Surg. 104a. 

Senior students are assigned to patients on the surgical wards in the University Hos- 
pital. They are responsible for the physical examination, history, and certain laboratory 
tests as required by the patient's disease. They participate in the active care and treat- 
ment of patients. 

Division of Neurosurgery 

Doctors: arnold, Thompson, and staff. 

Surg. 104b. 

Senior students assigned to this division act in the capacity of student interns. The 
students are closely integrated with the House Staff and are assigned sufficient patients 
so that comprehensive experience in the diagnosis and treatment of neurosurgical prob- 
lems is obtained. Instruction is through ward rounds and informal discussions. Wednes- 
day mornings are devoted to clinical, x-ray, and neuropathologic conferences. 

Division of Orthopedic Surgery- 
Doctors: AUSTIN (HEAD OF DIVISION), T. MORGAN, TANSEY, WILDER, AND STAFF. 

Surg. 103c. 

Junior students are assigned to this division in the Outpatient Department at Uni- 
versity and Mercy Hospitals. Patients are seen for diagnosis and postoperative care. 
Instruction is given in the application of plaster casts and in the ambulatory manage- 
ment of orthopedic problems. Occasion is given to instruction in the Physical Therapy 
of patients with orthopedic disease. 

Surg. 104c. 

Senior students are assigned patients both on the surgical wards and in the Emergency 
Room. They participate in the care of these patients, and are given instruction in the 
application of traction and plaster casts. Frequent ward rounds are held at the 
Kernan Hospital for Crippled Children. An Amputee Training Program is active. 

Division of Otolaryngology 

Doctors: alderman, blanchard. cross, engnoth, natale, o'rourk, and staff. 

Mercy Hospital: drs. gerlach, Isaacs, and Schwartz. 

Surg. 103e. 

In a series of six periods of four hours, in the Outpatient Otolaryngology Clinic, 
junior students are individually instructed in the techniques of the examination of the 
ears, nose, and throat. One hour of basic audiological technique is presented to each 
group by an audiologist, one hour of introductory speech pathology is presented by a 
speech pathologist. 

Surg. 104e. 

An advanced period of elective study with emphasis on diagnosis and treatment is 
available to approximately 18 senior students each year as an alternate elective 



Surgery • 107 

surgical specialty for one month's duration. In the Outpatient Department, diagnostic 
problems are presented at conferences with the staff department head twice each week 
and thoroughly reviewed in the light of current practice. Two sessions each week are 
available to the student to assist in the operating room and two sessions each week 
are available in the bronchoesophagology clinic. Each student is responsible for evening 
emergency calls on Ear, Nose, and Throat and examination of the patients admitted on 
the service. Daily ward rounds are carried out with the students. 

Division of Thoracic Surgery 

Doctors: attar, linberg, mc laughlin, miller, and staff. 

Surg. 104f. 

Senior students participate in the care of these patients in the operating rooms and on 
the wards of University, Mercy and Mt. Wilson Hospitals. In addition, they receive 
instruction in diagnostic bronchoscopy, esophagoscopy, cardiac catheterization, 
angiocardiography, and pulmonary function studies. 

Division of Urologic Surgery 

Doctors: young (head of division), Campbell, galleher, mays, and staff. 

Surg. 103d. 

Instruction is given to junior students in this division in the diagnosis of urologic 
disease of both men and women. The general aspects of instrumentation are discussed 
and the roentgenologic evidence of urologic disease is emphasized. 

Surg. 104d. 

Students are assigned patients in the University Hospital wards. Further instruction 
is given in diagnosis and instrumentation of these patients and in the x-ray diagnosis 
of urologic disease. 



Continuing Education Courses 



CONTINUING EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

ephraim t. lisansky, m.d.. Chairman and Director 

Gerald m. wagger, m.d., Assistant Director 

mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll, Executive Secretary 



HOWARD F. RASKIN, M.D. 
LEONARD SCHERLIS. M.D. 
WILLIAM S. SPICER, JR., M.D. 
DONALD A. WOLFEL. M.D. 
THEODORE E. WOODWARD, M.D. 



RAYMOND L. CLEMMENS. M.D. 
THOMAS B. CONNOR, M.D. 
VIRGINIA HUFFER, M.D. 
ARLIE R. MANSBERGER. JR., M.D. 
EDMUND B. MIDDLETON. M.D. 
ERLAND NELSON, M.D. 

DEAN WILLIAM S. STONE. M.D.. Ex Officio 

In an effort to assist the practicing physician to keep abreast of the newer 
developments in the science and practice of medicine, the Continuing Education 
Committee continues to offer courses in a variety of subjects. At this writing, it 
is planned to present on our campus, courses as follows: 

COURSE DURATION 

Advances in Medical Science 2 hrs./day, 1 day/week. 12 weeks 

1 day 

3 hrs./day. 2 days/week. 15 weeks 

1 day 

1 day 

1 day 

1 day 

3 days 

1 day 



Basic Electrocardiography 

Clinical Anatomy 

Clinical Cardiology 

Dermatology 

Diabetes 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat 

Family Counseling 

Gynecology 



Hematology 
Infectious Diseases 



1 day 

4 days (In association with 
American College of Physicians) 

5 days (or longer if requested) 

4 days (In association with 
American College of Physicians) 

5 davs 
1 day 
5 days (In association with 

American College of Physicians) 
1 day 
The In-Service program is one in which the various departments, or divisions 
within departments, are open to physicians interested in a particular facet of 



*In-Service 

Neurology for Internists 

Neuropathology for Pathologists 

Obstetrics 

Psychiatry for Internists 

Surgical Physiology 



108 



Matriculants 



109 



clinical medicine. Only a small number of enrollees can be accommodated at 
any one time, and arrangements to stay for more than 5 days may be arranged 
between the Chairman of the Continuing Education Committee and the Head 
of the Department involved. The Departments of Medicine, and its various 
divisions, and the Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Pediatrics lend 
themselves more conveniently to this type of postgraduate education. The De- 
partments of Surgery, Anesthesiology, and Obstetrics and Gynecology are less 
applicable to this program, but some type of In-Service program might be 
arranged after private consultation with the Chairman of the Continuing Educa- 
tion Committee and the Head of the Department involved. 

Inasmuch as this catalog material is being prepared in 1966 and is intended to 
cover activities through 1969, it is possible that new courses may be devised 
and others deleted during the intervening period. Please contact the Continuing 
Education Committee of the University of Maryland School of Medicine for 
further information regarding postgraduate courses. 



Matriculants 



FIRST YEAR 

Class of 1970 



Name 

Allender, Carlton Reay, Jr., B.A. 
Anderson, Arthur Osmund, B.S. 
Anderson, Willie Albert, B.A. 
Ardolino, Harry Anthony, A.B. 
Aronowitz, Jerome David, B.A. 
Austin, George Lynn, B.S. 
Baker, Alva Sayrs, III, B.A. 
Baltins, Aldis, B.S. 

Barney, Robert Lee, A.B. 

Bartek, Francis Andrew, B.S. 
Belaga, Gary A., B.S. 
Berkeley, David Howard, A.B. 
Berman, David Harold, B.A., M.S. 

Bloomfieid, Richard Alan, B.S. 
Bookoff, Charles Neal, B.S. 
Bowser, Michael Aaron, A.B. 
Braun, Martin, III, A.B. 
Briele, Henry Alison, Jr., B.A. 
Buchdahl, Alice Jean, B.A. 

Burkhart, Hanes Aleen, B.A. 
Byrne, Robert Francis, B.S. 
Cahill, Edward, B.S. 



Undergraduate School 


Home State 


Bridgewater College, 1965 


Maryland 


Wagner, 1966 


New York 


University of Virginia, 1966 


Maryland 


Providence, 1966 


Rhode Island 


University of Michigan, 1966 


New York 


Johns Hopkins University, 1966 


Maryland 


Western Maryland, 1966 


Maryland 


Georgetown University and 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1966 




Columbia Union College and 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1964 




Loyola, 1966 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1966 


Maryland 


Cornell University, 1966 


New York 


Grinnell and University of 


Illinois 


Illinois, 1964, 1966 




University of Maryland, 1966 


Maryland 


George Washington University, 1966 


Maryland 


Holy Cross, 1966 


New York 


University of Maryland, 1966 


Maryland 


Colgate University, 1966 


Maryland 


Goucher and University of 


Maryland 


Michigan, 1966 




University of Denver, 1966 


Maryland 


University of Scranton, 1966 


Resident 


University of Maryland, 1966 


Maryland 



110 



Matriculants 



Cameron, Carol Estelle, B.M., M.M. 
Caulfield, John Philip, B.S. 
Cramer, Dwight Evers, B.S. 
Courtney, Leo Albert, III, B.S. 
Craven, Robert Brent, B.S. 
dimming, Robert Gordon, B.S. 
Cunningham, Joseph Harry, Jr., A.B 
Daly, Timothy Paul, B.A. 
Davids, Joseph Zelig 
Davis, Mitchell Elliott, B.S. 
Davitz, Jerald Stuart, A.B. 
Douglas, Donald Dean, B.S. 
Dubansky, Stephen Aaron, B.S. 
Edmonds, Paul, B.S. 
Egbert, Robert Nelson, B.A. 
Epstein, Ralph Benjamin, A.B. 
Evers, Peter Laval, A.B. 
Fisher, Gary Philip, B.S. 
Friend, Joseph Neidig, B.S. 
Fuhrmann, Calvin Folk, A.B. 
Gordon, Julian Allan, B.A. 
Grasso, Michael Anthony, B.A. 
Green, David Philip, B.S. 
Greenberg, Stephen Baruch, B.A. 
Hakkarinen, Wm. David, B.S. 
Halikman, Louis Schaff, B.S. 
Heyman, Meyer Reuben, B.S. 
Higgins, Ivanhoe Bradshaw, Jr., B.A. 
Hirsch, Howard Mark 
Hisloop, Donald Hugh, A.B., M.S. 

Ho, Lin Hsueh, B.S. 

Hoffman, James Michael, A.B. 

Hoffman, Kenneth Michael, B.S. 

Houghton, Whitney, B.S. 

Hurwitz, Dennis Jay, B.S. 

Kahan, Sherman, B.S. 

Kanner, Howard Roy, B.A. 

Katz, Robert Stephen, B.A. 

Kilham, Michael, B.A. 

Klein, Gary Arnold, B.S. 

Kline, Thomas Frederick, A. A., B.S. 

Koeppel, Jerome, A.B. 
Koerber, Walter Albert, Jr., B.S. 

Kopper, James Andrew, B.S. 
Kressler, John Franklin, A.B. 
Lapoint, John Malcolm, B.S. 
Lavenstein, Bennett L., B.S. 
Leass, Donald Leon, A.B. 
Lebherz, Wm. Bennet, III, B.S. 
Levin, Stephen Norman, B.S. 
Levinson, Mark Barry, B.S. 
Levy, Juan Manuel, B.S. 
Lewis, Henry Allen, B.S. 
Lynn, Wm. Louis, III, B.S. 



Peabody Institute, 1955, 1957 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

University of Virginia, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

University of Delaware, 1966 Maryland 

LaSalle- Purdue University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 
George Washington University, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Creighton University, 1966 Illinois 

Union College, 1966 Maryland 

Trinity College, 1966 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1966 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1966 Maryland 
George Washington University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

University of Pittsburgh, 1965 Maryland 

Western Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Yeshiva University, 1966 Maryland 

Seton Hall University, 1966 Maryland 
Geo. Washington University, 1966 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1966 New Jersey 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Rutgers University, 1966 Maryland 

Franklin and Marshall Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

American University, 1966 

Swarthmore, 1966 Maryland 

Franklin and Marshall, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Notre Dame of Maryland, 1965 Virginia 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Lehigh University, 1966 New York 

Columbia University, 1966 Maryland 

Dartmouth College, 1966 New Hampshire 

Loyola College, 1966 Maryland 

A. Comm. College and University Maryland 

of Maryland, 1964, 1966 

Syracuse University, 1949 Maryland 

West Virginia University Maryland 

College of Agriculture, 1965 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 

Western Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Miami, 1966 Maryland 
George Washington University, 1966 Maryland 

Clark University, 1966 New York 

St. Mary's College, 1966 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1964 Maryland 

Albion College, 1966 New York 

Loyola College, 1965 Maryland 

Dickinson College, 1966 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1966 Maryland 



Matriculants 



111 



Mackowiak, Philip Arthur, B.S. 
Mahaffey, Jane Eliz., B.S. 
Marburg, Kenneth Chas. B.A. 
Marek, Chas. Bernard Jr., B.A. 
McCarthy, John Paul, B.S. 
McCready, Daniel Roy, B.S. 
Meehan, Peter Leo, B.S. 
Micgalski, Jos. Potter, A.B. 
Miller, Gary Wayne, A.B. 
Mills, Lasrence, Jr., B.A. 
Monsour, Roy Everett, B.S. 
Murphy, James Stephen, B.S. 
Myerowitz, Paul David, B.S. 
O'Neill, James Patrick, III, A.B. 
Parker, Leslie Karol, B.A. 
Parran, Jay Neil, B.S. 
Perry, David Arnold, B.S., M.A 



Pollard, Richard Byrd, Jr., B.S. 
Posner, David Browne, B.S. 

Prostic, Edward Joel, B.S. 
Queensberry, Wm. Otis, Jr., B.S. 
Rehert, Gerald Martin 
Richards, Rufus Henry, B.S. 
Robinson, Walker Lee, B.S. 
Samaras, George Charles, B.A. 
Sarlin, Robt. Frank, B.S. 
Schneidmuhl, Cecilia, A.B. 
Schreter, Robt. Kolker, B.A. 
Schulten, Herbert John, A.B. 
Schultz, Melvin James, Jr., A.B. 
Schumer, Dennis Robert, B.A. 
Schwarz, Hans Jeurgen, B.S. 
Shpritz, Louis Arthur, B.S. 
Shuman, Martin Jerry, B.S. 
Silverman, David Lee, B.S. 
Silverman, Michael Alan, B.S. 
Sobczak, Gregory T., B.A. 
Steinberg, Alan Zelig, B.S. 
Tapper, David, B.S. 
Taylor, Norman Wayne, B.S. 
Tseng, Sze (Stanley) Chuen, B.A. 
Ugorji, Clement C, B.S. 
Vicini, Henry Thos., B.S. 
Wade, Michael James, B.S., M.S. 
Wagner, Arthur Malcolm, B.A. 
Ward, Roberta Ann, B.S. 
Warren, William Addison, A.B. 
Warwick, Arthur Mark, B.A. 
Weiner, Charles Irving, B.A. 
White, Robert Irving, B.S. 
Wirsing, Charles John Jr., B.S. 
Woolsey, Carl T., Jr., B.S. 
Zaborowski, Stanley Milton, B.S. 
Zeller, Norman Lee, B.A. 



Bucknell University, 1966 
Allegheny College, 1966 
Wesley an University, 1966 
Johns Hopkins University, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
Western Maryland, 1966 
Holy Cross, 1966 
Dartmouth, 1966 
West Virginia University, 1966 
University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
University of Notre Dame, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
Fordham University, 1966 
Goucher College, 1966 
Case Institute of Technology, 1965 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and University of 
Massachusetts, 1960, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1966 
California Institute of Technology, 

1966 
Union, 1966 
Duke University, 1966 
University of Maryland 
Atlantic Christian, 1966 
Morgan State, 1962 
Gettysburg College, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
Temple University, 1965 
University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
Rutgers University, 1966 
Harvard, 1965 
Duke University, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1961 
University of Maryland, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
American University, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
Wayne State University, 1965 
University of Maryland, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1965 
Berea, 1966 
Livingston, 1966 
Georgetown University, 1966 
University of Utah, 1964; 1966 
University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
Pennsylvania State University, 1966 
University of North Carolina, 1965 
Western Reserve, 1966 
Gettysburg College, 1966 
Wesley an University, 1966 
University of Maryland, 1966 
University of Utah, 1965 
St. Peter's, 1966 
La Verne, 1964 



Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 



Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Utah 

Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

Ohio 

Maryland 

Connecticut 

Maryland 

Utah 

New Jersey 

Maryland 



112 



Matriculants 



SECOND YEAR 

Class of 1969 



Name 

Applefeld, Mark Michael, B.S. 
Aston. Edward Ernest. Jr. 
Ballard. James Otis, III, B.A. 
Banfield. William John. B.S. 
Bendit. Emil Abraham, B.S. 
Bercu, Barry Bernard, B.S. 
Berk, Sanders Harris, B.S. 
Blasko. John Chas., B.S. 
Boyer, Constance Lynn. A.B. 
Braitman. Barbara Sue, B.A. 
Brown. George Robert, B.S. 
Brownell. Douglas Allen. A.B., 

Brull. Stanley. B.S. 
Bryan. Donald William, B.A. 
Caplan. Howard Saul. A.B. 
Carter, Edward Allen, A.B. 
Chideckel. Elliott Wolfe, B.S. 
Cohan. Vaughn Dennis, B.S. 
Connors, Paul Joseph, A.B. 
Cooper. John Arthur, B.S. 
Copeland, Jay Stuart, B.S. 
Crawford, George Andrew, B.S. 
Crevey, Barry Joseph, B.S. 
Cutler, Leonard Dean, A.B. 
Davidov, Howard Allen. A.B. 
DeLeo, Dennis M., B.A. 
Doyle, Andrew Martin, B.S. 
Eaddy, John Albert. B.S. 
Eby, Barbara Jo-Anne, A.B. 
Elson, Ronald Lee. B.A. 
Emley. Michael J.. A.B. 
Esterson, Joseph Benson, B.S. 
Evers, Kathryn, A.B. 
Faden. Howard Syd. B.S. 
Faustine, Anthony Frank, B.S. 
Fisher, Richard Ernest, B.S. 
Freedenburg. Daniel J. Jr., A.B. 
Friedman. Barry Howard, A.B. 
Gibbas, Donna Lee, B.S. 
Gilmer, Graham, III, A.B. 
Godshalk, Mirian Fredrica, B.A. 
Goldberg. Samuel David, A.B. 
Goldstone. David Franklin, B.A. 
Goodman, Roy Roddy, B.S. 
Gordon, Marvin Jay 
Green, Phillip Michael 
Grosh, Julieta D., B.S. 
Gurley, Hubert T., Jr., B.S. 
Harper, Jay G., B.S. 
Harshberger, Waldo B., III. A.B. 



Undergraduate School Home State 
Washington and Lee University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland New Jersey 

West Virginia University, 1965 West Virginia 

Holy Cross College, 1963 Maryland 

University of Michigan, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Hood College, 1965 Maryland 

University of Wisconsin, 1964 Maryland 

Loyola, 1964 Maryland 

A. A. San Jose State College and California 
College of San Mateo, 1962, 1965 

Loyola, 1964 Maryland 

University of Utah, 1965 Utah 

Johns Hopkins University, 1965 Maryland 

West Virginia University, 1965 Maryland 

Loyola, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Holy Cross College, 1965 Massachusetts 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1965 Maryland 

Mt. St. Mary's College, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1963 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Tennessee, 1962 Maryland 

Goucher College, 1965 Maryland 

Brandeis University, 1965 Maryland 

Houghton, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Trinity College, 1964 Maryland 

Maryland University, 1965 Maryland 

Purdue University, 1965 Massachusetts 

Antioch College, 1965 Delaware 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Stanford University, 1964 California 

Hood College, 1965 New Jersey 

Franklin and Marshall, 1965 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Wisconsin, 1965 Maryland 

University of Utah, 1964 Utah 

Duke University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Frostburg State College, 1965 Maryland 



Matriculants 



113 



Heisel, Robert Alan, B.S. 
Herskovic, Arnold Manfred, B.S. 
Herskovic, Thomas Michael. A.B. 
Howell, Daniel Meredith, B.S. 
Hull, Kenneth Leo, 
B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E. 
Humphreys, Roberta Marie 
Hussey, Kathryn Evers, A.B. 
Kappelman, Mark David, A.B. 
Karr. Reynold Michael, Jr., B.A. 
Katz, Ronald Alan, B.S. 
Katzel, Lester David, A.B. 
Kaufman, Felix Lee, B.A. 
Kessler, Stanton Coleman, B.S. 
Kolker, Richard Jay. B.S. 
Kosnik, Edward James, B.S. 
Krause, Donald Warren, B.A. 
Leadbetter, Allen Wm, B.A. 
Lee, Audrey Diana, A.B. 
Levinson, Arnold Irving, B.S. 
Lipton, Andrew Bruce, B.A. 
Margolis, Murray Lee 
McCluggage, Chas. Wade, B.S. 
McCormick, John Richards, B.S. 
McCutcheon. Michael Edw., B.A. 
McNeely, Warren David, B.S. 
Meseroll, William Peter, B.S. 
Miles, Thomas Paul, B.A. 
Milholland, Arthur V., B.S. 
Miller, Michael Stephen, B.S. 
Mohler, Edwin Eugene, B.S. 
Moran, Daniel John, Jr., B.S. 
Morgan. Morgan, B.S. 
Mullis, Oscar Lee, Jr., A.B. 
Nadol, Robert, B.S. 
Parks, Ronald R., B.S. 
Parris, Wayne Howard, 
Paul, Malcolm David, B.S. 
Pfeifer, Donald Michael, B.A. 
Phillips, Robert Wayne, B.A. 
Pierce, Leslie Harrell, Jr., A.B. 
Pollard, John Davis, Jr., A.B. 
Potyka. James Smulin, B.A. 
Quinn. Edward Francis, II 
Rabinovich, Harris, B.S.E.; M.S. 

Reinstein, Leon, B.S. 
Rice, Donald Ervin, B.A. 
Richmond, David Russell, 
Roberts, Polly Ann Benbow, A.B. 
Rubin, Allan Ira 
SablofT, Jeffrey Dennis, B.S. 
Saunders, Brian Stanley, A.B. 
Schneider, Ronald Lynn, B.A., M.A 
Schrank, Wm. Winslow, A.B. 
Segal, Alan James, A.B. 



University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 
University of Kansas and University Maryland 

of Illinois, 1961, 1962 

Mt. St. Agnes College, 1965 Maryland 

Trinity College, 1964 Massachusetts 

Western Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 New York 

University of Cincinnati, 1964 Maryland 

Columbia University, 1965 Maryland 

Franklin and Marshall, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Pennsylvania, 1965 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1965 Maryland 
University of New Hampshire, 1963 Connecticut 

Johns Hopkins University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Rochester, 1956 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Lehigh University, 1965 New York 

University of Virginia, 1964 Maryland 

Ohio State University, 1965 Maryland 

Franklin and Marshall, 1965 Maryland 

Bowdoin College, 1965 New Jersey 

Alleghany College, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Virginia, 1965 Maryland 

Boston College, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Mt. St. Mary's College, 1965 Pennsylvania 

University of Scranton, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Elon College, 1962 North Carolina 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Rutgers University, 1965 Maryland 

Cornell University, 1965 Maryland 

Williams College, 1965 Maryland 

Syracuse University, 1964 Maryland 

Lehigh University, 1965 Pennsylvania 

University of Maryland. 1964 Maryland 
Johns Hopkins, 1959 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Alfred University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Goucher College, 1965 Maryland 

University of Pittsburgh. 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland. 1965 New Jersey 
American International College, 1965 Massachusetts 

Brooklyn College, 1957, 1961 Maryland 

Haverford College, 1965 Maryland 

Brown University, 1965 New York 



114 • Matriculants 



Seitz. Barbara JoAnne Eby, A.B. 
Shaffer. John Wade, B.A. 
Shawker, Thomas Harry 
Shobin, David Michael, A.B. 
Skitarelic, Kathryn Francis, A.B. 
Smith, John Arthur 
Smulyan, William Isaac, B.A. 
Snyder, David Howard, B.A. 
Sohr, William Eric, B.S. 
Solomon, David Allan. B.S. 
Spencer, Tracy Neil, III, B.A. 
Stanfield, Ronald Jeffrey, B.S. 
Stueber, Kristin, B.A. 
Stieglitz, Mimi Anne, B.S. 
Stolberg, Acosta, Robert Allan, B.S. 
Sugar, Mark Steven, B.A. 
Turk, Ellis, B.A. 
Turnbaugh, Lois, A.B. 
Ullman, Kenneth Chas., B.S. 

Voelkel, Paul Brown, A.B. 
Wall, Haven Neill, Jr., B.S. 
Wike, David Allen, B.S. 
Wilson, John Wesley, B.S. 

Zeligman, Bernard Elihu, A.B. 



Goucher College, 1965 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Pennsylvania, 1965 Maryland 

University of West Virginia, 1965 Maryland 

Maryland 

Franklin and Marshall, 1965 Maryland 

Western Reserve University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of North Carolina, 1965 West Va. 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

Mt. Holyoke College, 1965 Maryland 

Mercer University, 1965 Maryland 

University of Puerto Rico, 1965 P. R. 

Hobart College, 1965 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1965 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1959 Maryland 

University of Maryland (Pharmacy), Maryland 

1965 

University of Pittsburgh, 1964 Pennsylvania 

Marshall University, 1965 W. Va. 

University of Maryland, 1965 Maryland 

University of Maryland (Pharmacy), Maryland 

1963 

Johns Hopkins University, 1965 Maryland 



THIRD YEAR 



Name 

Allison, Samuel Bertram, A.B. 
Amoss, Willard Pitzer, A.B. 
Baum, Richard Alan, A.B. 
Beamon, Charles Ralph, Jr., A.B. 
Bearman, Sheldon Barry, A.B. 
Benenson, Michael Wm, A.B. 
Berman, Ethel Ann, A.B. 
Blum, Barry Alan, A.B. 
Blumberg, Morton Barry, A.B. 
Bowen, Bruce James, B.S. 
Britton, Robert Mark, B.S. 
Brull, Robert, B.S. 
Buddington, Richard Spencer, A.B. 
Caldwell, John Leo 
Callaghan, Jos. Francis, Jr., B.S. 
Caplan, Ellis Sanford, B.S. 
Cherry, Joel Mayer. B.S. 
Clopper, Todd Dalton, A.B. 
Cohen, Elliot Sanford, B.S. 
Colligan, Franklyn William, B.S. 
Daw, Albert Lee, A.B. 
Deegan, Michael John, B.S. 
Edwards, Charles C, A.B. 
Egloff, Allen Clark, A.B. 
Fausel, Robt. Wilton, Jr. 



Class of 1968 




Undergraduate School 


Home State 


Swarthmore College, 1964 


Delaware 


Western Maryland, 1964 


Maryland 


Brown University, 1964 


Maryland 


Johns Hopkins University, 1963 


Virginia 


University of Pennsylvania, 1964 


Maryland 


Cornell University, 1963 


New York 


Wheat on College, 1964 


New Jersey 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1962 


Maryland 


Trinity College, 1964 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1964 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1961 


Maryland 


Duke University, 1964 


Maryland 


Mt. St. Mary's College 


Maryland 


Boston College, 1964 


Massachusetts 


University of Maryland, 1964 


Maryland 


George Washington University, 1963 


Maryland 


Franklin and Marshall College, 1964 


New Jersey 


University of Maryland, 1964 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1962 


Maryland 


University of Virginia, 1957 


D. C. 


St. Joseph's College, 1964 


New Jersey 


Trinity College, 1964 


Maryland 


Grinnell College, 1964 


D. C. 


University of Maryland, 


Maryland 



Matriculants 



115 



Feldman, Gerald Barry, B.S. 
Fligsten, Kenneth Eugene, B.A. 

Franklin, Frank Anthony, Jr., B.S. 
Friedman, Howard Ronald, A.B. 
Frizzera, John Gordon, B.S. 
Fulton, Edwin Cockey, B.S. 
Gambrill, Raymond, III, B.S. 
Gehlert, Sidney Richard, III, B.S. 
Gelin, John deCourtenay, A.B. 
Glick, Ronald Sheldon 
Goldstein, Wm. Neal, A.B. 
Green, Gerald Ira, B.S. 
Groover, Jack Rochard. B.S. 
Handwerger, Barry Sheldon 
Harris. Roger Clark, A.B. 
Hart, William M., Jr. 
Herman, Melvin Herbert, Jr., B.S. 
Hess, Douglas Boone 
Hooper, Stephen LeRoy, A.B. 
Horowitz, Irvin Robert, B.S. 
Hubka, Ronald Richard, A.B. 
Hyman, George Fredric. B.S. 
Kane, James Gregory, Jr., B.S. 
Keech, Richard Chas., B.S. 
Keegan, Kirk A., Jr., B.S. 
Knefely, Geo. McLanahan, Jr., A.B. 
Knowles, Frederick Edwin, III, A.B. 
Koski, Carol Lee, B.S. 
Kulik, Frank Albert, B.S. 
Lancelotta, Charles Joseph, Jr., A.B. 
Lazarus, Barry Alan, A.B. 
Legum, Ronald Michael, A.B. 
Levenson, Stanley M., B.S. 
Levin, Gordon Leonard, B.S. 
Litt, Abraham Abba, B.S. 
Little, Raymond Roger, B.S. 
Littman, Philip, A.B. 
Long. Wm. Broughton, III, B.S. 
Mahoney, Carroll Davis, B.S. 
Malinow, Stanford Howard, B.S. 
Manekin, Steven Frederick 
McGuire, Terence Aloysius, B.S. 
McNinch, Eugene Robinson, Jr., 

A.B. 
Mech, Karl Frederick, Jr., A.B. 
Mendelsohn, Herbert Eugene, A.B. 
Merlis, Anthony Logan, A.B. 
Mikesell, Kathryn Ann. A.B. 
Miller. Bruce Lawrence. A.B. 
Morgan, Beverly Estelle 
Morton, Bert Frederick. A.B. 
Nordgren, A. Curtis, B.S. 

Norwood, Thomas Hyatt, A.B. 
Pattee, Burton Charles, B.S. 
Potosky, Ronald Stephen. A.B. 



University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of California at D. C. 

Los Angeles, 1960 

Yale University, 1964 New Jersey 

Yeshiva College, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Eastern Michigan University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1964 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 Delaware 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Oberlin College, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Georgia, 1964 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Maryland 

The Citadel, 1964 Maryland 

Gettysburg College Pennsylvania 

University of Pennsylvania, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Union College, 1964 New York 

Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 Maryland 

The Citadel, 1964 Massachusetts 

Western Maryland College, 1964 Maryland 

Harvard College, 1964 Maryland 

Goucher College, 1964 Maryland 

Columbia University, 1960 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1964 Maryland 

Western Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Wisconsin, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

Stamford University, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Georgetown University, 1964 Maryland 

Swarthmore College, 1964 Delaware 

Wesleyan College, 1964 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1964 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 Maryland 

University of California, 1964 D.C. 

Western Maryland College, 1964 Maryland 

Morgan State College Maryland 

Western Reserve University, 1963 Ohio 

Massachusetts Institute of Kansas 

Technology, 1963 

Brown University, 1960 Maryland 

Antioch College, 1964 Iowa 

Johns Hopkins University. 1964 Maryland 



116 



Matriculants 



Quillen, Carl Gray, A.B. 
Rankin, Thos. Vincent, B.S. 
Reed, Wm. Arno, B.S. 
Renbaum, Joel Wm., A.B. 
Riddlesberger, Merchline Mills, Jr. 

B.S. 
Riley, David Joseph A.B. 
Rimash, Rorick Theodore, A.B. 
Rivera-Reyes, Luis Raphael, B.S. 
Roihl, Norbert Henry, A.B. 
Rosenbaum, Stephen David, A.B. 
Rosensteel, Robert Jos., Jr., B.S. 
Rosenstock, Jeffrey Gallant, A.B. 
Samorodin, Charles Steven 
Schaefer, Walter Charles 
Schonfeld, Burton Gary, A.B. 
Semins, Howard, A.B. 

Shack, Michael John 
Shaw, John Marx 
Spielman, Stuart Henry, A.B. 
Stafford, John Davis, A.B. 
Staufer, Wilfred Bryan 
Stuart, Franklin Richard, Jr. 
Stuppler, Stephen Allen, B.S. 
Tannenbaum, Alice Susan, B.S. 
Turner, Elizabeth Anne, B.S., M.S. 

Valigorsky, Jon Michael, B.S. 

Vergne-Marirti, Pedro Juan, B.S. 
Volcjak, Edward Eugene, B.S. 
Wambaugh, George Wilmar, 

Jr., B.S. 
Weimer, Stanley Robert, B.S. 
Welsh, James Joseph, Jr., B.S. 

Whitworth, Michael Franklin, A.B. 
Widmeyer, Robert Samuel, II 
Williams, Robert Thomas 
Williams, William Morgan, B.S. 
Willis, Eigene, Jr. 
Winakur, Stuart, B.S. 

Winter, Stephen Lee, A.B. 
Wolfe, Irving Darryl, A.B. 
Woodrow, Kenneth M., A.B. 
Young, Edward John, A.B., M.S. 

Zavis, Daniel Thor, B.S. 



Lafayette College, 1964 
Loyola College, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
Dickinson College, 1964 

Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
University of Puerto Rico, 1964 
Cornell University, 1964 
Western Maryland College, 1964 
Loyola College, 1964 
Columbia College, 1964 
University of Maryland 
University of Maryland 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964 
Washington and Jefferson 

College, 1964 
Randolph-Macon College, 1964 
Union College, 1964 
Columbia University, 1964 
San Jose State College, 1963 
University of Maryland 
University of Utah 
University of Maryland, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1964 
Maryville College and D rex el 1959 

Institute of Technology, 1958, 
University of Maryland (Munich), 

1963 
University of Puerto Rico, 1964 
University of Maryland, 1963 
Loyola College, 1964 

Pennsylvania State University, 1964 
University of Maryland 

(Pharmacy), 1963 
Brown University, 1963 
University of Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Western Maryland College 
University of Maryland 

(Pharmacy), 1963 
University of Chicago, 1964 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963 
Wesley an University, 1964 
Columbia and Georgetown 

University, 1959, 1963 
University of Maryland, 1963 



New Jersey 
Maryland 
D. C. 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

New York 

Puerto Rico 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

New York 

California 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Puerto Rico 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Illinois 
Maryland 
New York 
New York 



Maryland 



FOURTH YEAR 
Class of 1967 



Name 

Abel, Elizabeth Ann, B.S. 



Undergraduate School 
Colby Junior College, 1961 



Home State 
Maryland 



Matriculants • 117 



Alperstein, Joel Barry, B.S. 
Adalman, Stephen Morris, B.S. 
Banfield, Wm. John, B.S. 
Bigbee, John Albert, B.S. 
Blondin, Sandra Lee, B.S. 
Bloom, William Frank, A.B. 
Bollinger, Mary Sue, A.B. 
Boddie, Wm. Leon, B.S. 
Bright, Donald St., A.B. 
Butchart, John C, B.S. 
Carter, Colvin Cecil, B.S., M.S. 

Cohen, Edward Ralph, B.S. 
DeFelice, Charles E., B.S. 
Dobrzycki, Gerard D., B.S. 
Drake, Frances Dalton, B.S. 
Dyro, Frances Mary, B.S. 
Eagle, Perry Alan, B.S. 
Earles, Gordon Homer 
Emory, Thomas E., A.B. 
Feldman, Harris J., A.B. 
Feldman, Larry Brian, A.B. 
Feuer, Henry, 

FetterhofT, Ira Lincoln, A.B. 
Fine, Eric Michael, B.S. 
France, Robert Orville, A.B. 
Gareis, John William 
Gimbel, Joseph Samuel, A.B. 
Glushakow, Allen Stanley, B.S. 
Goffman, Joel Henry, B.S. 
Gracia-Culpeper, Jose R., B.S. 
Hadden, David Malcolm, A.B. 
Hamby, James Lawrence, B.S. 
Hertzog, Robert William, B.S. 
Hoffman, Arthur Michael, B.S. 
Houston, John Joseph, B.S. 
Hricko, George Medard B.S. 
Hughes, Arthur Lee, B.S. 
Ignatowski, John Stephen, B.S. 
Jackson, Jean Marlene, B.S. 
Jones, Philip Dickson, A.B. 
Jordan, Charles Edward, III, A.B. 
Kaliner, Michael Aron, B.S. 
Kandel, Elizabeth Earle, A.B. 
Kester, Eugene Francis, A.B. 
Konrad, James Gerard, B.S. 
Kraemer, Elihu Mark, B.S. 
Lapes, George Anthony, B.S. 
Lattin, Gary Marc, A.B. 
Lee, Michael Morgan, A.B. 
Lessans, Stuart Harvey, A.B. 
Lichtenstein, Jack Ruben 
Lytle, Gary Scott, A.B. 
Mack, Richard Henry, B.S. 
Markowitz, Sheldon L., A.B. 
McCaffrey, Robert James, B.S. 
McHold, David Stanley, A.B. 



University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

University of New York, 1963 New York 

Holy Cross College, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Dickinson College, 1963 Maryland 

University of North Carolina, 1963 Maryland 

Immaculata College, 1962 Maryland 

Howard University, 1963 Maryland 

Princeton University, 1963 Maryland 

University of California, 1963 Hawaii 

Howard University, 1959; Maryland 

Elizabethtown, 1963 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Virginia Military Institute, 1963 Maryland 

Massachusetts Inst, of Tech., 1963 Maine 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Western Maryland College, 1963 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Carroll College, 1951 Maryland 
George Washington University, 1964 Maryland 
Franklin & Marshall College, 1964 Maryland 

University of Maryland Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Puerto Rico, 1962 Puerto Rico 

Stanford University, 1957 California 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Morgan State College, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Georgetown University, 1962 Maryland 

Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1961 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

University of Rhode Island, 1963 Rhode Island 

Princeton University, 1963 Maryland 

Cornell University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1963 Maryland 

Goucher College, 1963 Maryland 

New York University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland, 1962 Maryland 

Union College, 1963 New Jersey 

University of Maryland, 1962 D. C. 

Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Maryland 

Ohio Wesleyan University, 1963 Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Maryland Maryland 

Temple University, 1961 New Jersey 

University of Notre Dame, 1963 Ohio 

Washington University, 1963 Maryland 

University of Rochester, 1962 New York 

Morehead State College, 1962 Maryland 



118 



Matriculants 



Mclntyre, John Milton, B.S. 
Miller, Louis Winaker, B.S. 
Mitnick, Alan Harvey, B.S. 
Myers, Boyd Douglas, A.B. 
Nelson, Fred Ritchie, A.B. 
Novicki, Donald Edward, B.S. 
O'Donnell, Thomas J., A.B. 
Orlando, Joseph C, B.S. 
Ostroff, Edward B., B.S. 

Palmisano, Frank S., B.S. 
Paritzky, Arnold Z., A.B. 
Pelovitz, Howard Leon, B.S. 
Pfeffer, Bruce William, A.B. 
Pohost, Gerald M., B.S. 
Posner, Carol Jean, A.B. 
Pristoop, Allan Sanford, B.S. 
Raikes, Merrill C, III, A.B. 
Reymond, Ralph Daniel, A.B., 

Rogers, John Francis, A.B. 
Rosen, Howard Roy, B.S. 
Routenberg, John Albert, B.S. 
Rowell, John Russell, Jr., B.S. 
Sachs, Marvin Coleman, B.S. 
Samuels, Jeffrey Allan, A.B. 
Sansone, Peter Frank, A.B. 
Schilling, Lee Howard, A.B. 
Sewell, John Calvert, B.S. 
Sherman, Michael Lewis, A.B. 
Sherr, Howard Paul, B.S. 
Shuster, Harold Frederick, B.S. 

Skloven, Zellman David, A.B. 
Smith, John James, III, B.S. 
Snyder, David Michael, B.S. 
Sofferman, Robert Alan, A.B. 
Stapen, Joseph Ira, B.S. 
Stern, Kenneth Bernard, B.S. 
Sussman, Michael David, A.B. 

Tierney, Lawrence M., A.B. 
Valigorsky, John Michael, B.S. 
Vogel, Donald Bruce, B.S. 
Wardlaw, Stephen Clark, 
Warner, Larry Joseph, B.S. 
Wendt, Charles Edw. Jr., B.S. 
Wexler, Alan Michael, B.S. 
Wilner, Gary Norman, B.S. 
Wolf, Alan Frederick, B.S. 
Yakaitis, Ronald Wm„ B.S. 
Zorick, Frank John, B.S. 



University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Western Maryland College, 1963 


Maryland 


Johns Hopkins University, 1962 


Maryland 


Mt. St. Mary's College, 1963 


Maryland 


Johns Hopkins University, 1963 


Maryland 


Loyola College, 1962 


Maryland 


Washington and Lee University, 


Maryland 


1963 




Loyola College, 1962 


Maryland 


Johns Hopkins University, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Georgetown University, 1963 


Pennsylvania 


George Washington University, 1963 


Maryland 


Swarthmore College, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Colby College, 1963 


Maryland 


.A. Johns Hopkins University, 1959, 


Maryland 


1963 




Johns Hopkins University, 1963 


Maryland 


Dickinson College, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Johns Hopkins University, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Pennsylvania, 1963 


Rhode Island 


San Diego State College, 1961 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Duke University, 1963 


Maryland 


College of the Holy Cross, 1963 


Maryland 


Stevens Institute of Technology, 


Maryland 


1954 




Cornell University, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Georgetown University, 1963 


D. C. 


Lehigh University, 1963 


New Jersey 


University of Maryland, 1963 


New York 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Washington and Lee University, 


Maryland 


1963 




Yale University, 1963 


Connecticut 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Pennsylvania 


University of Maryland, 1962 


Maryland 


University of Maryland 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


South Carolina 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1961 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 


Loyola College, 1963 


Maryland 


University of Maryland, 1963 


Maryland 









Geographical Distribution— Academic 
Year 1966-1967 



1st. 2nd. 3rd. 4th. Total 

British Guiana 1 

California 

Connecticut 1 

Cuba 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Delaware 

Florida 

Hawaii 

Illinois 3 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Maine 

Maryland 102 

Massachusetts 1 

Michigan 1 

New Hampshire 1 

New Jersey 4 

New York 7 

Nigeria 1 

North Carolina 

Ohio 1 

Pennsylvania 

Puerto Rico 

Rhode Island 1 

South Carolina 

Utah 1 

Virginia 1 

West Virginia 

Total 128 127 123 107 485 









1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1 


4 

1 




7 


2 


10 


2 


3 




5 




1 




1 






1 


1 




1 




4 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 


101 


83 


89 


375 


4 


2 




7 

1 
i 


4 


6 


3 


i 
17 


3 


7 


3 


20 

1 


1 






1 




1 




2 


3 


4 


3 


10 


1 


2 


1 


4 






2 


3 






1 


1 


2 






3 




1 




2 


3 






3 



119 



Medical Alumni Association 

Officers for 1966-1967 



Dr. Howard B. Mays, President 

Dr. John O. Sharrett, President-Elect 

Dr. Benjamin M. Stein, Vice-President 

Dr. Patricia Dodd, Vice-President 

Dr. Raymond M. Cunningham, Vice-President 

Dr. Walter E. Karfgin, Treasurer 

Dr. Theodore Kardash, Secretary 

Dr. William H. Triplett, Executive Director 

Mrs. Wm. B. Girkin, Executive Secretary 

Members of Board of Directors 
Dr. William H. Kammer, Jr. 
Dr. Robert B. Goldstein 
Dr. John D. Young 
Dr. Harry C. Bowie 
Dr. Theodore Stacy 
Dr. Wilfred H. Townshend, Jr. 
Dr. John C. Dumler, Sr. 
Dr. W. Kenneth Mansfield 
Dr. J. Howard Franz, Ex -officio 
Dr. C. Parke Scarborough, Ex-officio 

Nominating Committee 
Dr. J. Howard Franz, Ex-officio 
Dr. C. Parke Scarborough, Ex-officio 
Dr. D. McClelland Dixon 
Dr. James R. Karns 
Dr. Edward F. Cotter 

Representatives to General Alumni Council 
Dr. Howard B. Mays, Ex-officio 
Dr. Robert B. Goldstein 
Dr. William H. Triplett 

Representatives to Editorial 
Board, BULLETIN to be announced 
Representatives to Faculty Board 
Dr. C. Parke Scarborough 
Dr. Howard B. Mays, 



120 



Endowment Fund 



The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

WETHERBEE FORT, M.D., President HARRY CLIFTON BYRD 

AUSTIN C. DIGGS H. VERNON ENEY 

EVERETT S. DIGGS, M.D. FREDERIC M. HEWITT 

E. ROBERT KENT GEORGE H. YEAGER, M.D. 

james r. karns, m.d., Secy.-Treas. 



This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its legal title 
being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland," 
and is independent and self-perpetuating. Except as may be otherwise directed 
by the donor with respect to particular funds, the powers of the Trustees are 
limited to the expenditure of the interest or income derived from the various 
funds or donations which are applied as directed by the donors for the benefit of 
the University. They may be made to the general or University Fund, to the 
Medical Fund or to any other department of the University. If intended for the 
School of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some 
special object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes 
of the donor will be strictly regarded. Checks should be made payable to The 
Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland, and sent to Dr. 
James R. Karns, 800 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR REQUEST 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the law of the state 
of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Medicine 



(Here state amount or describe property) 



121 



Faculty Index 

Abehouse, G. A 74 

Abeles, A. L 51 

Abrams, R. C 74 

Abushanab, V 69 

Acton, C. B 53 

Adams, E 45, 48, 51, 84 

Adams, G. K 50 

Adams, J. E 64, 97, 98 

Adams, T. R 74, 105 

Adelman, W. J., Jr 48, 68, 99 

Agapitos, G. N 53 

Akin, S. B 69, 103 

Albright, M. J 69, 103 

Alderman, G. C 74, 106 

Allen, L. L 74, 104 

Ances, I. G 61, 96 

Anderson, A. R 70, 103 

Anderson, A. W 53 

Andres, R 53 

Andrese, A. P 61 

Anthony, R. L 52 

Antlitz, A. M 53, 90 

Antoine, S. J 51 

Aoki, H 61 

Aposhian, H. V 45, 48. 52, 86 

Ardinger, J. S 62 

Arnold, J. G., Jr 47, 74. 106 

Aronson, H 70, 103 

Ascher, E 70, 103 

Ashman, L 53 

Attar, M 53, 92 

Attar, S 74, 107 

Atwood, J. M 45, 50 

Ault, V. L 65, 68 

Austin, G. N 47, 48, 68, 

75, 105, 106 

Aziz, M. A 52 

Baca, M 62, 96 

Bacharach, D 53, 91 

Badell, H 70. 103 

Baitch, A 75 

Baker, J. T 62 

Baker, L. R 50 

Baker, R. H 52, 87' 

Baldwin, R. W 65, 68. 99 

Balis, G 70, 103 

Ballard, M. B 49, 62 

Balsam, F. J 69 



Bardall, K. R 51 

Barnett, H. C 52, 87 

Barnett, R. M 62 

Barraclough, C. A 68, 99 

Barrett, C. P 50 

Barrett, H. V 46, 69, 102 

Bartemeier, L. H 70, 103 

Bauernschrub, G. M 65 

Baumann, C. G 69 

Beacham, E. G 54, 88 

Beauge, L. A 51 

Beck, H. M 62 

Becker, R 68 

Beeby, J. L 78 

Begum, F 52, 61 

Belcher, H. V 75 

Bell, F. K 52 

Bereston, E. S 54, 88, 91 

Bergmann, H 65 

Bernstein, H. N 63, 96 

Berry, R. Z 75 

Bessman, S. P 46, 48, 51, 

65, 84, 99 

Besson, E. H 65 

Bianco, E. A 54 

Biehl, H. P 75 

Blake, W. D 45, 48, 68, 99 

Blanchard, C. L 47, 48, 75, 

105, 106 

Blazek, C. J 54 

Blide, R. M 54, 93 

Bloedorn. F 47, 74, 104 

Blum, L. V 54 

Boaz, T. D 63, 96 

Boccuti, A. R 50 

Bode, V. C 51, 84 

Boggio, J. P. C 62 

Borges, F. J 47, 48, 54, 88, 92 

Bowie, H. C 47, 49, 75, 105 

Bradford, N. H 70, 103 

Bradley, J. E 49, 65, 99 

Brady, L 62, 96 

Brager, S. H 54 

Brantigan, O. C 49. 75, 81 

Braude. M. C 70. 103 

Braver, D. A 63, 96 

Brazauskas, N 60 

Brenner, A 65 



123 



124 



Fa< i'lty Index 



Briele, H. A 75 

Brody, E. B 45, 48, 69. 103 

Brown, A. V 51. 84 

Brown, G. P 70, 103 

Bryan. V 61 

Bulmash. M. H 49. 81 

Bundick. W. R 54 

Burgin. B 54 

Burgison, R. M 52, 86 

Burkart. T. J 64, 97 

Burnett, J. W 54, 88. 91 

Burns, H. B 75 

Burns. J. P 52 

Bums, T. A 50 

Buscher. H. N 52 

Buxton, R. W 45. 48, 74, 105 

Byerly. M. P 54 

Cader. G 54 

Campbell, E. W., Jr 75, 107 

Canner, P. L 52 

Caplan, L. H 65 

Carr, C. J 52 

Carroll, D. G 54, 88 

Carson. J. E 70, 103 

Cascorbi, H. F 52, 86 

Cavonius, C. R 63, 96 

Cerino, M. T 75 

Chang. Y.-F 51, 84 

Charache, P 54, 88 

Chodoff. P. ." 50 

Christensen, O. D 62 

Church, G 54 

Cicci. R. L 68, 75 

Clark, F. A.. Jr 75 

Clark, J. W 60 

Clemmens, R. L 46. 65. 68, 

70, 99. 103 

Clyde, D. F 52. 87 

Cohen. A. B 61 

Cohen, B. S 54 

Cohen. H 62. 96 

Cohen. J. H 54, 88 

Cohn, J. V 70. 103 

Cole. G. A 61 

Coleman. P. D 46. 68. 99 

Connor. T. B 54, 88, 92 

Cook. E. E.. Jr 54 

Coplan. R. S 62 

Cordi, J. M 65 

Cornbrooks. E. I.. Jr 62. 96 

Correa. R. A. Q 70 

Cotter. E. F 46. 54. 88. 93 

Cowen. J. R 70, 103 

Cowley, R. A 47, 75, 105 

Cox. E. F 47, 75, 105 

Crago, R 60 



Cranley, R. E 64, 97 

Creamer, J. J 63, 96 

Creelman. C 70 

Crispens. C. G.. Jr 45, 49, 81 

Crosby. R. M. N 65, 75 

Cross, E., Jr 54 

Cross, R. J 75, 106 

Cunha, J. A 70 

Cunningham, R. M 75 

Davidson, C. N 74, 104 

Davis, G. H 62, 96, 103 

Davis. J. R 54 

Davis, N. M 70 

Deane, G. E 65 

Dembo. D. H 54, 90 

Dennis. J. M 45, 47, 48, 74, 104 

Derbyshire, R. L 70, 103 

Descalzi, M 65 

DeVincentis. M. L 75 

De Weer, P. J 51 

Diamond, L. S 75 

Diaz. A 54 

Diener. R. L 62 

Diggs, E. S 62, 96 

Dixon. D. McC 62, 96 

Doane, M. G 51 

Dodd, W. A 62 

Donaghue. D. A 50 

Donahoe, K 70 

Donati. E. J 49, 81 

Donnelley, M. J.. Jr 52 

Dorset, D. L 51 

Dowling, A. S 69, 102 

Dritsas, K. G 75 

Dudley, W. C 54 

Dumler, J. C 62, 96 

Dunn. D. J 69 

Dunnigan. W. C 75 

Durkan, J. P 46, 62, 96 

Duvall. R. G 54 

Dwin, C. R 75 

Dwver. F. P.. Jr 75 

Eastland. J. S 54, 88 

Ebeling. W. C, III 54, 88 

Ebv. Sister D 51 

Eh'rlich. D 62 

Eichler, M 70, 103 

Einberg, E 70 

Ellinger. E. F 54, 88 

Ellis, F. A 54, 88, 91 

Emery, A. J., Jr 46. 51, 84 

Engoth. M. L 75, 106 

Entwisle. G 45, 54, 68, 88. 102 

Esmond, W. C 55, 75 

Evans, R. L 55, 88 

Eylar, O. R 46. 48, 60, 94 



Faculty Index • 125 



Fabrikant, I. B 61 

Fajer, A. B 68, 99 

Farinholt, L. W., Jr 70, 103 

Farrell, E. V 69 

Fassett, D 70 

Feinberg, G. N 63, 96 

Feldman, M., Jr 55 

Fernandez, A. C 55 

Fiedler, K. R 70, 103 

Figge, F. H. J 45, 48, 49, 81 

Findley, J. D 70, 103 

Fine, J. H 69 

Fineman, J 65, 99 

Finkelstein, A. H 65, 99 

Finlay, T. H 51 

Finn, R. B 70, 103 

Fiocco, V 55 

Firminger, H. 1 45, 48, 64, 97 

Fiset, L. G 55, 93 

Fiset, P 60, 94 

Fisher, R. S 64, 97, 98 

Fitzpatrick, V. DeP., Jr 62 

Fitzpatrick, W. N 70, 103 

Fletcher, M. M 75 

Flotte, C. T 47, 75, 105 

Flynn, P. D 55 

Forrester, D 70 

Forster, I. A., Jr 70, 103 

Fort, W 55, 88 

Fox, S. L 46, 63, 68, 96 

Frankel, J 66, 71 

Freeman, 1 55, 88 

Freimuth, H. C 64, 97, 98 

Friedenberg, R 71, 103 

Friedman, M 55 

Frumento, A. S 51 

Funk, A 55 

Furnari, J. C 55 

Gakenheimer, W. A 55 

Gallaher, J. P 62 

Galleher, E. P 47, 76, 107 

Garcia, R 62, 96 

Gareis, L. C 62 

Garlick, W. L 76 

Gaskel, J. H 76 

George, J. E 52, 87 

Gerlach, J. J 76, 107 

Gessner, J. E 69, 102 

Glaser, E. M 68 

Glaser, K 66, 68, 71, 99, 103 

Glick, G 50, 99 

Glick, S. S 66 

Gold, M. 1 45, 50, 83 

Goldberg, J. R 63, 96 

Goldiamond, 1 71, 103 

Goldmann, H 71, 103 



Goldstein, A 51 

Goldstein, M 55 

Goldstein, R. B 76 

Gonzalez, L. E 55, 90 

Goodman, H 66 

Gordon, B. S 71, 103 

Gorten, M. K 66, 99 

Gorwitz, K 71, 103 

Goshorn, G 66 

Govatos, G 76, 107 

Grant, J 68 

Greenstein, G. H 76 

Greisman, S. E 55, 68, 88, 99 

Grenell, R. G 71, 103 

Grenzer, W. H 55 

Gross, A 71, 103 

Gross, G. M 71, 103 

Gross, H 71, 103 

Gross, M 71, 103 

Grossman, M. S 46, 66, 68, 99 

Gryder, R. M 51, 84 

Guerin, P. F 64. 97 

Gundry, L. P 55, 88 

Gutches, G. A., Jr 71, 103 

Hachtel, F. W 49 

Haider, R 55 

Haines, J. S 76 

Haley, A. J 53, 87 

Hall, W. M 62 

Hamberry, L. G 76 

Hamed, J. D 60 

Hameli, A. Z 64, 97 

Hankin, S. J 55 

Hanowell, E. G 55 

Harmon, L. E 55 

Harris, K 71 

Harris, W. M 71, 103 

Harrison, D. P 51 

Hart, W. M 63, 96 

Hartl, J 71, 103 

Hartz 71, 103 

Haskins, A. L 45, 48, 61, 96 

Hatchtel, F. W 60 

Hatgi, J. N 61 

Hawkins, J. E 55 

Hawthorne, I. H 78 

Hayleck, M. L 66 

Hayman, I. A 52 

Hazama, H 71. 103 

Hearn. J. B 74, 81, 104 

Hebb, D. B 76 

Hebel, J. R 69, 102 

Heck, A. F 46, 61, 95 

Hecker, E 62 

Hecker, W. A 66 

Heefner, W. A 64 



126 



Faculty Index 



Heiner, G. G 53 

Heiner, J 60 

Heinz, E. C 53, 55 

Heldrich, F. J., Jr 66, 99 

Helfrich, R. F 76 

Helfrich, W. G 55 

Helrich, M . . 45, 48, 50, 83 

Henderson, CM 76 

Henderson, M. M 46, 69, 102 

Hendrickson, G 64, 97 

Hendry, M. H 69 

Hepner, R 66, 99 

Herbert, M 71, 103 

Hersperger, W. G 55 

Hetherington, L. H 55, 88 

Hicken, W. J 64, 97 

Hicks, L 68 

Hilger, T 68, 76 

Hill, CD 62 

Hinton, D 51 

Hitchman, I. L 71, 103 

Ho, I. I-P 53 

Holbrook, W. A 76 

Holden, W 71, 103 

Holder, W. L 71, 103 

Hollander, M. B 55, 91 

Holljes, H. W. D 55 

Hooper, Z. V 55 

Hopps, H. C 64, 97 

Hornick, R. B 55, 88, 93 

Howell, C 66 

Hubbard, T. B., Jr 76, 105 

Hudson, B 68 

Huffer, V 46, 71, 103 

Hulfish, B 61, 71, 95, 103 

Hull, H. C 76, 107 

Hunsacker, M 60 

Hybl, A 46, 51, 85 

Hyman, N. B 74, 104 

Inayatullah, M 60 

Irwin, R. C 66 

Isaacs, B. H 76, 106 

Jackson, E. B 55 

Jacobson, M. W 55, 88 

Jacobson, W 71, 103 

James, W. E 62 

Jantz, E. M 68, 71, 103 

Jelenko, C, III 51 

Jenci, J 50 

Jenicek, J. A 50 

Jennings, F. L 49 

Jensen, P. J 66, 99 

Jiji, R 56, 88, 91 

Johnson, N. F 51 

Johnston, D. F 71, 103 

Jones, E. D 76 



Jurf, A. N 68, 99 

Kallins, E. S 56 

Kaltreider, D. F 62, 96 

Kammer, W. H 56 

Kappelman, M 66, 99 

Kardash, T 62, 96 

Karfgin, A 56 

Karfgin, W. E 56 

Karns, C. F 76 

Karns, J. R 27, 46, 56, 88 

Karpeles, L. M 46, 68, 99 

Kasik, F. T., Jr 56 

Kassel, L. E 56 

Katase, R. Y 64, 97 

Kaufmann, T. Y 61 

Kemick, LB 56 

Kenny, T. J 66 

Kent, Y. V 50 

Keown, L. L 56 

Kerr, H. D 56, 93 

Khazel, A. H 78 

Kieffer, L 64 

Kime, P. W 64, 97 

King, J. D. B 56 

Kirby, W. H., Jr 78 

Kirkley, L. R 76 

Kirkpatrick, C. N., Jr 56 

Kirtley, M. E 51, 84 

Kitasato, H 51 

Kitlowski, E. A 76 

Klee, G. D 46, 71, 103 

Klein, D. F 66 

Klimt, C. R 45, 52, 87 

Knatterud, G. L 53, 87 

Knox, G. S 74, 104 

Kochman, L. A 56, 90 

Kogan, L. L 64, 96 

Kohlmeyer, W. A 71, 103 

Koppanyi, Z. H. B 66 

Korman, W 62 

Krahl, V. E 45, 48, 49, 81 

Kramer, D. N 78 

Kramer, H. C 76 

Kramer, M 71, 103 

Kramer, M. D 61, 71, 95, 103 

Krantz, J. C, Jr 49, 52, 86 

Krause, L. A. M 56, 88 

Krevans, J. R 56 

Kronmeyer, R 61 

Kubie, L. S 72, 103 

Kucharski, W. E 53, 87 

Kuehn, F. G 56 

Kuller, L. H 69 

Kunkel, F 60 

Kurland, A 72, 103 

La Brosse, E 78 



Faculty Index • 127 



Lampton, E. W., Jr 50 

Lancaster. R. G 56, 91 

Landesmann, R 50 

Lang, R. C 66 

Langenfelder, H. E 76 

Lavenstein, A. F 66 

Layne, E. C 51, 56, 84, 88, 91 

Leach, C. E 56, 88 

LeBouvier, J. D 76 

Lee, A 60 

Lee, Y.-C 56, 88, 90 

Legum, S. E 56, 88 

Lentz, G. A., Jr 46, 66, 68, 69. 99 

Lerman, L. R 56 

Lerner, P. F 56, 88 

Leslie, F. E 56 

Leveque, T. E 45, 49, 81 

Levin, H 64, 97 

Levin, H. E 60, 94 

Levin, L. E 72, 103 

Levin, M 56 

Levin, N 62 

Levy, K 56, 88 

Lewandowski, A. A 56, 92 

Lewis, H. A 72, 103 

Li, L 51 

Linberg, E. J 45, 47, 48, 76, 

105, 107 

Lindenberg, R 64, 97, 98 

Linhardt, E. G 49, 81 

Linthicum, CM 56, 91 

Lippman, E. M 66, 68 

Lisansky, E. T 45, 48, 56, 72, 88, 103 

Lister, L 57 

Liu, S.-J 57 

Logue, D. D 66 

Loker, F. F 76 

London, R. L 46, 66, 68, 99 

Long, W. B 76 

Lopez-Majano, V 57 

Love, W. S 49, 57 

Lovice, H 57 

Low, P. E 51 

Lyden, R. J 57 

Lynn, W. D 76 

Lyon, J. A., Jr 46, 66, 74, 104 

Machen, J. W 66 

Mackie, J. B 72, 103 

Magruder, W. W 72, 103 

Maher, E. E 66 

Mahoney, F. 1 69. 102 

Mansberger. A 47, 48. 76, 105 

Mansdorfer, G. B 66 

Marek, C. B 62 

Marine. D. N 57, 93 

Markowitz, S 72 



Martin, C. W 62, 96 

Masaitis, C 78 

Masters, J. M 49, 57, 81, 91 

Matthews, M. E 66 

Maxwell, A 72, 103 

Maxwell, G. A 62 

Mayer, R. F 61, 95 

Mays, H. B 47, 76, 105, 107 

McAlsan, T. C 50 

McCarthy, V. C 53 

McCrumb, F. R., Jr 48, 53, 57, 

60, 66, 94 

McCue, C 72, 103 

McElroy, E 72, 103 

McElwain, H. B 76 

McFadden, R. B 49, 81 

McLaughlin, J. S 77, 107 

McLean, G 57 

McNally, H. B 62, 96 

McQueen, J. D 72 

Mead, J 57 

Mech, K. F 49, 77, 81, 105 

Meinert, C. L 53, 87 

Meisels, A. A 64, 96 

Mendonca, P. P 78 

Merkel, W. C 64, 97 

Merhs, J. K 46, 61, 68, 95, 99 

Merrill, G. G 57, 88 

Messina, J 60 

Meyer, F. J 52 

Michaelis, M 64. 96 

Middlebrook, G 53, 87 

Middleton, E. B 62, 96 

Miller, J. E 77 

Miller, J. M 77, 107 

Miller, N. L 67, 68 

Miller, S 57, 91 

Mintzer, D. W 57 

Misenheimer, H. R 62, 96 

Monroe, R. R 72, 103 

Moore, H. E 36 

Moore, K 77 

Morgan, T. H 77, 106 

Morgan, Z. R 57 

Morris, F. K 63, 96 

Morrison. J. H 63, 96 

Morrison, S 57, 88 

Morrison, T. H 57, 88 

Morse, D 60 

Mosberg, W. H.. Jr 77, 105 

Mosser, R. S 61, 67. 95. 99 

Moszkowski, E 46, 63. 96 

Mott, T.. Jr 72. 103 

Mould, L. L 63 

Mujeeb, M 53 

Mullen. P. A 67 



128 



Faculty Index 



Muller, S. E 57, 88 

Mullins, L. J 45, 48, 51, 85 

Munford, R. S 63, 96 

Murthy, V. V 51 

Muse, J. E., Jr 57 

Musser, R. D 49, 52, 86 

Myers, J. A 57 

Myers, J. C 57 

Myers, W. F 60, 94 

Nair, P 67, 68 

Nakazawa, M 72 

Nasdor, H. H 63 

Natale, R. D 77, 106 

Navarro, E 74, 104 

Nelson, E 45, 48, 61, 95 

Nelson, A. T 50 

Nelson, J. W 77 

Niermann, W. A 67 

Nietfeld, H. W 78 

Nolan, J. J 57 

Noshpitz, J 72, 103 

Novak, T. M 69 

Novin, N 50, 76, 81 

Nur Ahmad, Lt. Col 53, 87 

Ochota, L 57 

O'Connor, J. C 72, 103 

Oleynick, A. H 61, 72, 95, 103 

Olivier, M. L 50 

Ollodart, R. M 61, 78, 105 

O'Mansky, S. 1 57, 67 

O'Neill, J. J 52, 86 

Oppenheimer, R 72, 103 

O'Reilly, J. P 78 

O'Rourk, T. R 77, 106 

Ortel, R. L 64, 96 

Osterman, J. V 61 

Otenasek, F. J 77 

Oursler, D. A 57 

Ozer, M 72, 103 

Paget, D. H 78 

Panayis, A. P 63 

Pangborn, W. A 51 

Papadopoulos, C 57 

Parker, R. T 57, 88 

Parker, W. S 67 

Parr, J 64, 97, 98 

Passen, S 64, 97 

Payton, O. D 69 

Pearson, J. W 50 

Perry, R 61 

Pessagno, D. J 77 

Petrali, J. P 50 

Petty, C. S 64, 97, 98 

Pfeiffer, C. B 50 

Phelan, P. C, Jr 77 

Phillips, F. E 72, 103 



Pierpont, R. Z 77 

Pijanowski, W. J 57 

Pinter, G. G 68, 99 

Polachek, A. A 57 

Pollack, S. L 52 

Polley, E. H 50, 81 

Pomerantz, S 46, 51, 84 

Pope, A 72, 103 

Pope, B 46, 103 

Porter, H. P 77 

Powder, J. R 77 

Press, L 72, 103 

Pullen, P 60 

Queen, J. E 57 

Queene, R 72 

Quinn, M. K 57 

Quinton, S. W 64, 97 

Raab, K 69 

Rae-Grant, N 72, 103 

Rafferty, F. T., Jr 46, 72, 103 

Raher, J 72, 103 

Rahman, A. N 57 

Ramapuram, G. M 57 

Ramirez-Rivera, J 58, 93 

Ramsay, F. J 50, 81 

Ramsey, H. J 61, 95 

Ramsey, R 72 

Randall, L. L 63 

Randall, R 58 

Randol, C. L 67 

Rappeport, J 72, 103 

Raskin, H. A 46, 58, 88, 92 

Raskin, J 58, 88, 91 

Rasmussen, P 64, 97 

Rastogi, S. C 53 

Redding, J. S 50 

Reed, J. W 58, 69, 73, 102, 103 

Reese, J. M 49, 63 

Reggiardo, Z 61 

Reimann, D. L 65, 97 

Reiss, M. D 74, 104 

Reiter, R. A 58, 88 

Remley, S 60 

Remsberg, J. R. S 58 

Rennels, M. L 50, 81 

Renner, 1 67 

Reuber, M. D 65, 97 

Revell, S. T. R., Jr 58, 88 

Rever, W. B., Jr 77 

Richards, R. D 45, 48, 63, 96 

Richardson, A. D 69, 102 

Richardson, P. F 47, 69, 102 

Rimer, B. A 46, 63, 96 

Rivera, A. M 67 

Robertson, R. G 53, 61 

Robinson, H. M., Jr 58, 88, 91 



Faculty Index • 129 



Robinson, I. M 33 

Robinson, J. E 74, 104 

Robinson, K. E 73, 103 

Robinson, R. C. V 58, 88, 91 

Romero, E 73 

Roop, D. J 58 

Roseman, M 73, 103 

Rosen, L. S 51 

Rosenholtz 47, 48, 65, 97 

Rosenzweig, E. C 46, 61, 94 

Rosin, J. D 77 

Ross, J 64, 96 

Rosso, G. R 51 

Rothfeld, B 58 

Rothmund, H 67 

Rovelstad, H 33 

Rubin, S 58 

Rudo, F. G 52, 86 

Rusche, E 58, 93 

Ruvolo, A 51 

Sack, L 73, 103 

Sakamoto, T 52 

Sakles, C. J 73, 103 

Salan, J 58 

Sanders, D 68 

Sardana, 1 73 

Sasaki, A 53 

Sata, L. S 46, 73, 103 

Saunders, E 58 

Saunders, O. H 67 

Savage, C 73, 103 

Scarborough, C. P 47, 77, 105 

Scherlis, 1 77 

Scherlis, L. A 45, 47, 48, 58, 67, 

88, 90 

Scherlis, S 58, 67, 88, 90, 99 

Schiffman, G 67, 99 

Schleifer, C. B 73, 103 

Schmuff, H 73 

Schnaper, N 73, 103 

Schneider, M 73 

Schochet, B 73, 103 

Schocket, S. S 46, 64, 96 

Schonfield, J 69, 73, 102, 103 

Schubart, A. F 58, 88, 90 

Schultz, R. B 46, 48, 65, 97 

Schulz, C 73, 103 

Schuster, M. M 58 

Schwartz, T. A 77, 105, 106 

Schweda, P 65, 97, 98 

Scott, H. B 58 

Seabold, W. M 67, 99 

Seegar, J. K. B. E., Jr 63, 96 

Segall, S 58 

Serpick, A 58 

Serra, L. M 58, 88 



Settle, W. B 50, 77, 81 

Seydel, G. H 74, 104 

Shaffer, J 73, 103 

Shah, S. A. S 53 

Shama, Z 78 

Shapiro, A 58, 88, 91 

Sharrett, J. 77 

Shaw, C. E 46, 58 

Shea, W. H 58 

Shear, J 58 

Shearer, D 60 

Shell, J. H., Jr 63 

Sherman, J 58 

Sherrard, M. L 58 

Sherrer, E. L., Jr 58, 91 

Sherrill, E. B 59 

Shirai, A 61 

Shock, N. W 68, 99 

Shockett, B. R 59 

Siegel, I. A 63 

Siegman, A. W 73, 103 

Sigman, B 67, 99 

Silberman, R 61 

Silver, A. A 59 

Silverstein, E. H 59 

Simpson, D. G 59, 88, 93 

Sina, B 59 

Sinaly, N. P 59 

Singleton, R. T 59, 68, 88, 90 

Sinton, W. A., Jr 67 

Sister Mary Blanche 51 

Siwinski, A. G 77. 105 

Sjodin, R. A 46, 51, 85 

Smith, D. C 49, 68 

Smith, F. B 67, 99 

Smith, S 59, 88 

Smith, S. W 63 

Smith, V. M 59, 88, 92 

Smoot, R. T 59 

Snyder, J. M 50 

Snyder, J. N 59 

Snyder, M. J 48, 59, 61, 88, 93, 94 

Solomon, N 59, 68, 88, 99 

Speed, W. C, III 59 

Spencer, H. R 49, 65 

Spicer, W. S., Jr 59, 88, 93 

Spitz, W 65, 97, 98 

Spragins, M 67 

Springate, C. S 65, 97, 98 

Spurling, C. L 47, 59, 88, 91 

Stambler, A. A 67 

Standiford, W. E 67 

StarcKe, H 61 

Stauffer, J. C 59 

Steinbach, S. R 59 

Sternberger. N 51 



130 • Faculty Index 



Stewart, E. H., Jr 77, 107 

Shchel, F. L., Jr 77 

Stine, O. C 67,99 

Stone, W. S 45, 47,48 

Strahan, J. E 59, 68 

Strautz, R. L 50 

Styrt, J 73, 103 

Suddhimondala, C 78 

Sunday, S. D 59 

Supik, W. J 77 

Sutton, G. G. 61, 95 

Swall, R. F 53 

Swisher, K. Y., Jr 59, 88, 90 

Tack, O. C, Jr 53 

Takashima, K 51 

Tansey, J. J 77, 106 

Tarr, N 77 

Tayback, M 69, 102 

Teitelbaum, H. A 61, 95 

Thistel, C 73, 103 

Thomas, D. B 53 

Thomas, W. N 74, 104 

Thompson, R. K 78, 105, 106 

Threatt, B. A 74, 104 

Tigertt, W. D 59, 88 

Tingey, H. B 78 

Tinker, F. X. P 63 

Togo, Y 59, 93 

Toher, J. E 63 

Toll, M. W 46, 65, 97 

Toth, Z. J 63 

Toulson, W. H 49, 76 

Townshend, W. H., Jr 59 

Tramer, A 67 

Trattner, R. E 73, 103 

Traub, R 60, 94 

Truitt, E. B., Jr 52, 86 

Tudino, M. E 59 

Turek, 1 73, 103 

Twining, R. H 59 

Uigur, U 73, 103 

Updike, R 60 

Valderas, J. G 63 

Van Buskirk, C 61, 95 

Vance, A 67 

Van Lill, S. J 59 

Vauls, K 73 

Ventling, CD 67 

Vidaver, R. M 73, 103 

Villa Santa, U 46, 63, 96 

Vollmer, F. J 59 

Von Muehlen, L. H 73, 103 

Voshell, A. F 49, 78 

Wadsworth, G. E 50, 81 

Wagger, G 59, 92 

Waghelstein, J 59 



Wagner, J. A 65, 97, 98 

Walker, S. H 67, 99 

Walker, W. W 50, 78, 81 

Wall, G. H 67 

Wall, L. A., Jr 59 

Wallop, W. H 74, 104 

Walsh, W. T 61 

Wang, T. S 52 

Wapnir, R. A 67, 99 

Warfel, L. E 61 

Warthen, F. J 73, 103 

Weaver, K. H 46, 47, 48, 65, 99 

Weber, R 60 

Weeks, W. E 67 

Weinberg, T 65, 97 

Weiner, I. H 78 

Weintraub, W 46, 73, 103 

Weisman, M. N 73, 103 

Weiss, H. R 78 

Wells, G. E., Jr 63 

Wells, G. J 67, 99 

Wells, J 45, 50, 81 

Wells, R 61 

Wenzlaff, E. F 78 

Westney, L. S 63, 96 

White, E. C 67 

White, J. P., Ill 78 

Wich, J. C 67 

Wideman, J. M 51 

Wiedman, A. K 78 

Wilfson, D 60 

Wilhelmsen, H. R 78 

Will, D. R 78 

Will, O. A 74, 103 

Williams, C. H 60 

Williams, McC 60 

Wilson, K 74 

Wilson, M. A 53 

Wise, K 74, 103 

Wise, S. P 74 

Wise, W. D 49, 78 

Wisotzkey, H. M 65, 97 

Wisseman, C. L., Jr. ... 45, 48, 60, 88, 94 

Wiswell, J. G 46, 48, 60, 88, 92 

Wittier, R. G 61 

Wizenberg, M. J 74, 104 

Wolfel, D. A 46, 74 

Wood, C 65, 97 

Woodward, C. L 60 

Woodward, T. E 45, 48, 53, 88 

Womack, W. S 63 

Workman, J. B 60, 88, 92 

Worsley, T. L., Jr 60 

Wright, C. E 67 

Wright, R. B 65, 97 

Yaffe, S. N 60, 91 



Faculty Index • 131 

Yang, Y 53 Zarbin, G. L. F 67 

Yeager, G. H 47, 48, 78, 105 Zerzavy, F. M 63 

Yim, R. E 67 Zevallos, P 53 

Young, 1 74, 103 Zieve, P. D 60, 88 

Young, J. D., Jr 68, 78, 92, 105, 107 Zinn, W. F 49, 78 



Subject Index 



Administration Building 29 

Administration, members 43 

Admission, requirements 8 

Advancement for graduation 12 

Alpha Omega Alpha— National 

Medical Society 25 

American Medical Association Loans . . 23 

Anatomy 81 

Anesthesiology 83 

Application, method of making 10 

Art as Applied to Medicine 84 

Arthritis 90 

Avalon Scholarship 22 

B 

Baccalaureate degree 15 

Baltimore City Hospitals 39 

Baltimore Student Union Board 24 

Balder Scholarship Award 20 

Biological Chemistry 84 

Biophysics 85 

Bressler Research Laboratory 29 

C 

Cardiology 90 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology 86 

Clinical Pathological Conference 

Award 21 

Clinical Pathology 91 

Combined Doctor of Philosophy- 
Doctor of Medicine program 15 

Commencement, attendance 28 

Continuing Education Courses 108 

Curriculum, organization 11 

D 

Davidge Hall 29 

Dermatology 91 

Diplomas, application form 28 

Dr. Wayne W. Babcock Prize 21 

Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger Prize 21 

Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial 

Prize 20 



Dr. Leonard M. Hummel Memorial 

Award 20 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson. Sr., Prize ... 21 

Dr. Milton S. Sacks Memorial Award . 21 

Dr. John B. Weaver Fellowship 23 

E 

Endocrinology and Metabolism 92 

Endowment Fund 121 

Equipment, required 19 

Eye Research Foundation of Bethesda . 40 

F 

Faculty Board 45 

Faculty, members 49 

Faculty Prize 20 

Federal Health Professions 

Scholarship Program 21 

Federal Health Professions Student 

Loan Program 23 

Fees 17 

Fees, nonpayment 18 

Fees, re-examination 18 

Fellowships 23 

Financial aid 21 

Forensic Pathology 98 

G 

Grading system 12 

Graduate program 15 

Gray Laboratory 29 

H 

Health Sciences Library 33 

Historical Sketch 40 

Hospitalization 27 

Housing 27 

Honor Council 24 

Howard Hall 29 

Hypertension and Renal Disease .... 92 

I 

Infectious Diseases 93 



133 



134 • Subject Index 



Intrafraternity Council 25 

International Medicine 87 

Internships and residencies 15 

K 

Kernan, James Lawrence, Hospital 
and Industrial School of Maryland 

for Crippled Children 37 

L 

Leave of absence 19 

Loan funds 23 

M 

Maryland General Hospital 39 

Matriculants 109 

Medical Alumni Association 120 

Medical Historical Society 25 

Medical Technology Building 29 

Mercy Hospital 37 

Microbiology 94 

N 

Neurology 95 

Neuropathology 98 

Neurosurgery 106 

Non-resident, definition 8 

O 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 96 

Ophthalmology 96 

Orthopedic Surgery 106 

Otolaryngology 106 

P 

Pathology 97 

Pediatrics 99 

Physical Diagnosis 93 

Physiology 99 

Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 102 

Prizes and Awards 20 

Psychiatry 103 

Pulmonary Diseases 93 

R 

Radiology 104 



Registration fee 17 

Requirements for admission to 

advanced standing 10 

Requirements for admission to 

first year class 9 

Resident, definition 8 

Rules, general faculty 11 

S 

Scholarships 21 

State board examination, 

certification 13 

State Scholarships for General 

Practice 22 

Student Activities Committee 24 

Student Activities Fund 18 

Student American Medical Association . 25 

Student Council 24 

Student Council Emergency Loan Fund . 23 
Student Council Intramural Athletic 

Program 25 

Student employment 24 

Student Health Service 27 

Student organizations 24 

Student Research Fellowships 23 

Surgery 105 

T 

Thoracic Surgery 107 

Tuition 17 

U 

University Hospital 33 

University loans 23 

University scholarships 22 

Urologic Surgery 107 



W 



Warfield Freshman Merit Scholarship . 22 

Withdrawal, academic standing on . . . 18 

Withdrawal, procedure 18 

Withdrawal, refund of fees 19 

Women's Auxiliary, Student American 

Medical Association 25 

Y 

Yearbook 25 






THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
—always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF MEDIC INj 

1969-1971 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN 



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Contents 



Academic Calendar 2 

Aerial View of Campus 5 

Requirements for Admission 6 

Instructions Leading to Degree of Doctor of Medicine 9 

Additional Educational Programs 13 

Tuition, Fees, and Registration 15 

Required Equipment 17 

Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds 18 

General Information 22 

Buildings and Facilities 28 

Affiliated Institutions 36 

Historical Sketch 39 

Administration 42 

Faculty Organization 44 

Faculty 45 

Organization of Curriculum and Courses of Instruction 81 

Continuing Education Courses 112 

Physical Therapy, Department of 114 

Description of Courses, Physical Therapy 118 

Endowment Fund 122 

Medical School Alumni Association 123 

Faculty Index 125 

Subject Index 134 

Calendar 1969-1971 Cover 3 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable con- 
tract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University re- 
serves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the 
student's term of residence. The University further reserves the right, at any 
time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



CATALOG 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

1969-1971 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 







Medical School Calendar for 1969-1970 



1969 SCHOOL CALENDAR 

AUGUST 18-22 Re -examinations for advancement 

SEPTEMBER 2 1st year orientation 

Registration and payment of fees, 

2nd and 3rd years 

3 1st year orientation 

Registration and payment of fees, 

1st and 2nd years 
3rd year orientation 



9 A.M.* 



9 A.M.* 



First semester begins September 4, 1969 and ends January 26, 1970 

SEPTEMBER 4 Instruction begins for all classes 

NOVEMBER 26 Thanksgiving recess begins at 5 P.M. 

DECEMBER 1 Instruction resumes for all classes 

23 Christmas recess begins at 5 P.M. 



JANUARY 



22 and 23 



1970 SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Instruction resumes for all classes 
Registration and payment of fees 
for second semester — all classes 



9 A.M.* 



JANUARY 


{ 24 




26 


MARCH 


26 




31 


APRIL 


10 




20 




21 and 22 


MAY 


22 




29 




29 




30 


JUNE 


1 and 2 




5 




6 




1-5 




16 and 17 



Second semester begins January 26 

Last day of first semester 

Beginning of second semester 

Easter recess begins at 5 P.M. for 3rd and 4th years. 

Instruction resumes for 3rd and 4th years 

Spring vacation begins at 5 P.M. for 1st and 2nd years 

Instruction resumes for 1st and 2nd years 

National Board Examinations, Part 11** 

Classes cease for 4th year at 5 P.M. 

Classes cease for 3rd year at 5 P.M. 

Classes cease for 1st and 2nd years at 12 noon 

Holiday — Memorial Day 

Examinations for 3rd year 

Pre-commencement — Baltimore Campus 

Commencement Exercises — College Park Campus 

Examinations for 1st and 2nd years 

National Boards, Part I** 



*ALL students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment 
of fees on regular registration days. Those who do not complete their registration 
on the prescribed days will be charged a PENALTY FEE OF $20.00. The Office 
of the Registrar is in Howard Hall and the Office of the Comptroller is in the 
University; both offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 
P.M. 

"♦National Board dates are TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 



1970 SCHOOL CALENDAR 



AUGUST 17-21 Re-examinations for advancement 

SEPTEMBER 8 1st year orientation 

Registration and payment of fees, 

2nd and 3rd years 

9 1st year orientation 
3rd year orientation 
Registration and payment of fees, 
1st and 4th years 



9 A.M.* 



9 A.M.* 



First semester begins September 10, 1970 and ends January 25, 1971 

Instruction begins for all classes SEPTEMBER 5 

NOVEMBER 25 Thanksgiving recess begins at 5 P.M. 

30 Instruction resumes for all classes 

DECEMBER 23 Christmas recess begins at 5 P.M. 



7977 SCHOOL CALENDAR 

JANUARY 4 Instruction resumes for all classes 

21 and 22 Registration and payment of fees 

for second semester — all classes 
23 Last day of first semester 



9 A.M.* 



JANUARY 




25 


FEBRUARY 


22 


APRIL 




8 

12-16 

13 

19 




20 a 


MAY 




21 
29 
29 
30 


JUNE 




1 and 2 

4 

5 

1-4 




15 


and 16 



Second semester begins January 27, 1971 

Beginning of second semester 

Holiday — Washington's Birthday 

Easter recess begins for 3rd and 4th years at 5 P.M. 

Spring vacation begins at 5 P.M. for 1st and 2nd years 

Instructions resumes for 3rd and 4th years 

Instruction resumes for 1st and 2nd years 

National Boards, Part II** 

Classes cease for 4th year at 12 noon 

Classes cease for 1st and 2nd years »at 12 noon 

Classes cease for 3rd year at 5 P.M. 

Holiday — Memorial Day 

Examinations for 3rd year 

Pre-commencement — Baltimore Campus 

Commencement Exercises — College Park Campus 

Examinations for 1st and 2nd years 

National Boards, Part I** 



*ALL students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment 
of fees on regular registration days. Those who do not complete their registration 
on the prescribed days will be charged a PENALTY FEE OF $20.00. The Office 
of the Registrar is in Howard Hall and the Office of the Comptroller is in the Uni- 
versity; both offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. 

**National Board dates are TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 



4 • School of Medicine 



Key to University of Maryland Buildings 



1. School of Law 

2. Westminster Church 

3. North Campus Parking Facility 

4. New School of Dentistry 

5. Howard Hall 

6. Hospital 

7. New North Hospital 

8. School Trauma Center 

9. Helistop and Parking Garage 

10. School of Social Work and 
Administration Building 

11. School of Dentistry 

12. School of Nursing 

13. School of Pharmacy 



14. New School of Nursing 

15. Post Mortem Exam 

16. Baltimore Union 

17. Out Patient Department 

18. Health Science Library 

19. DavidgeHall 

20. Mental Health Hospital 

21. Kelly Memorial Building 

22. Weste™ Health Dist. 

23. Medical Tech. Building 

24. Gray Laboratory 

25. University College 

26. Psychiatric Institute 

27. Bressler Research Building 




U of M 



ilro. Campus 



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Requirements for Admission 



General Statement. The University of Maryland, in all its branches and 
divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal educational opportunity for peoples 
of all races, creeds and ethnic origins. 

Policy on Admissions 

Academic achievement, extra-curricular activities, personal characteristics, 
recommendations from college instructors or the premedical committee, scores 
on the Medical College Admissions Test, and personal interview are all carefully 
considered in evaluating an applicant. Academic achievement alone does not 
automatically insure acceptance as the Committee is equally concerned with 
personality, aptitude, character, integrity, motivation, and assessment of the in- 
dividual as a potential physician. A letter of recommendation is required from 
the premedical committee. If there is no premedical committee, letters are re- 
quested from two science and one non-science course instructors. Letters from 
other sources are not encouraged. Candidates will be expected to complete all 
required premedical courses before June 15 of the year they are to matriculate. 
With permission of the Committee on Admissions, this requirement at times 
may be waived. All courses must be completed prior to registration in the 
School of Medicine in September. 

Matriculants are required to accept the provisions of the Honor Code and to 
agree to assume its obligations prior to registration. A copy of the Honor Code 
and agreement form is sent to each candidate with notice of acceptance. 

Although preference will be given to Maryland residents, applications from 
well qualified students from other areas of the United States and Canada are 
welcome. Because of the many applicants for the number of places available, 
applicants can be considered only if they are citizens of the United States or 
Canada. Applicants from foreign schools must complete at least two years of 
premedical work in an approved college or university in the United States or 
Canada. 

Definition of Resident and Non-Resident 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the time 
of their registration, their parents have been domiciled in this State for at least 
six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of the 
State by maintaining such residence for at least six months. 

However, the right of the minor to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if, at the time of their registra- 



University of Maryland • 7 

tion, they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the Armed Forces while 
stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six month period 
referred to above, except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 
Maryland for at least one year prior to his entrance into the Armed Services 
and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicle may be maintained. 

Requirements for Admission to First Year Class 

Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses, particu- 
larly in the natural sciences. Except under unusual circumstances the student 
should plan a four year curriculum with a suitable Arts and Science major 
leading to a bachelor's degree. A major in an area other than science is quite 
acceptable although it is not intended to divert students from a science major if 
this is their field of choice. The student taking science courses beyond the mini- 
mal requirements is encouraged to take si;ch subjects as embryology, compara- 
tive anatomy, psychology, anthropology, physical chemistry, or cellular physi- 
ology. Courses duplicating medical school work, such as histology, neurology, 
biochemistry, mammalian physiology, human anatomy, and bacteriology are 
not recommended unless they are required in the student's major sequence. Hav- 
ing credit in such courses will not excuse students from taking them in medical 
school. In the non-science area courses in English, philosophy, sociology, eco- 
nomics, history and government and politics are recommended. Mathematics 
through calculus is also recommended. 

Applicants who choose a non-science major should take a sequence of science 
courses which demonstrates their academic ability to capably handle the demands 
made by these courses. 

A minimum of 90 semester hours (three academic years) of acceptable college 
credit is required exclusive of physical education and military science, earned 
in colleges of arts and sciences whose names occur on the current list of "Ac- 
credited Institutions of Higher Education" as compiled by the National Com- 
mittee of Regional Accrediting Agencies of the United States. Applicants who 
will have earned a bachelor's degree in arts and sciences before registration for 
medical school from an approved college or university will be given preference 
over applicants who have not completed the requirements for the bachelor's 
degree. Only those courses will be acceptable which are approved for credit 
towards an A.B. or B.S. degree by the university or college attended as well as 
the University of Maryland. 

The following college courses and credits at an acceptable level are required 
before registering for Medical School. 

Semester Hours 

General biology or zoology 8 

Inorganic chemistry 8 

Organic chemistry 6 

General physics 8 

English 12 

Foreign language 6 



8 • School of Medicine 

No more than 60 hours can be accepted from accredited Junior Colleges and 
then only if these credits are validated by a college offering a Bachelor of Arts 
or Science Degree. 

Applicants over the age of 26 cannot be encouraged to apply. 

An evaluation of the applicant's credentials is made by members of the Com- 
mittee of Admissions to determine if an interview is to be requested. This deci- 
sion is based upon a composite estimate of the applicant's ability and future 
promise in the field of medicine as measured by his academic record to date, 
performance in the Medical College Admissions Test, recommendations of the 
premedical faculty, extracurricular activities, and the applicant's overall stand- 
ing as compared with that of the other applicants applying that year. Such 
interviews must be scheduled in advance at the initiative of the Committee. 

The Medical College Admission Test should be taken in May and must be 
taken no later than October of the year preceding the year of entrance. Ap- 
plicants should write the Psychological Testing Corporation, 304 East 45th 
Street, New York, New York 10017, for further information and for registra- 
tion forms. 

Requirements for Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students who have attended approved medical schools are eligible to file ap- 
plications for admission to the second and third year classes only. These appli- 
cants must meet the current first year entrance requirements in addition to pre- 
senting acceptable medical school credentials, and a medical school record 
based on courses which are equivalent to similar courses in this school. 

Application for advanced standing must be made no later than April 15 of 
the year of desired admission. 

No student can be considered who has been dismissed from any medical 
school unless his former Dean submits a letter addressed to the Committee on 
Admissions stating the student is reinstated in good standing and eligible for 
promotion. 

No student can be considered who is not eligible for promotion at time of 
transfer. 

Applicants for admission to third year class are required to complete satis- 
factorily the National Board Examination, Part I, before registration. 

Persons who already hold the degree of Doctor of Medicine will not be ad- 
mitted to the Medical School as a candidate for that degree from this University. 

No applicants from foreign medical schools can be considered for advanced 
standing. 

Application for admission to advanced standing is made in accordance with 
instructions accompanying the application form. 

Method of Making Application 

Requests for application forms should be sent to The Committee on Admis- 
sions, School of Medicine, 522 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. 

Application for admission to the first year class entering in September must 
be filed between July 1 and December 31 of the year prior to desired admission. 
Requests for application forms should be made after June 15. Application ma- 



University of Maryland • 9 

terial cannot be released after December 15. The deadline for receiving the ap- 
plication form is December 31. 

It is very definitely in the best interests of the applicant to file the application 
form and supporting credentials early in the application period. Please do not 
have supporting credentials sent prior to filing a final application. 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to see that all required credentials and 
the completed application packet are filed with and received by the Committee 
on Admissions. This especially applies to the letter of recommendation from the 
premedical committee, transcripts from all institutions attended (sent directly 
from that institution to the Committee), and the scores on the Medical College 
Admissions Test. 

Orientation for New Students 

All new students, whether they are admitted to the first year class or with 
advanced standing, are expected to attend Orientation for New Students. 



Instruction Leading to the Degree of 
Doctor of Medicine 

Organization of Curriculum 

The curriculum is organized to permit students to acquire fundamental knowl- 
edge of the principles of medicine, establish habits of applying critical evaluation 
and judgment to problems of health and disease, and develop ethical principles 
which inspire trust in their patients and respect of the community. 

Instruction encompasses four academic years. The first and second years are 
largely devoted to the study of the basic medical sciences. In the first year, 
physiology, biochemistry, and biophysics are given as one correlated course, i.e., 
Introduction to Basic Medical Sciences and this is closely correlated with anat- 
omy. After introductory laboratory experience, the students work in small 
groups on projects in any of the basic medical science departments. Each sub- 
ject relates to the concept that basic knowledge has its clinical application. The 
student is guided in the acquisition of detail which he acquires by himself. A 
closely knit interdepartmental approach to the curriculum is being developed in 
order to enable the student to use the techniques and knowledge of basic science 
for the better understanding and more rational scientific approach to the clinical 
management of human illness. Student research is encouraged during the sum- 
mer recesses and during the elective times in the curriculum. In most courses, 
the final examination as the sole test of achievement has disappeared, and the 
student's final grade is determined by examinations, seminars, conferences, and 
assigned work carried on throughout the course. Where applicable, teaching is 
done under the direction of a faculty committee from several departments. This 



10 • School of Medicine 

method of teaching provides better correlation and coordination of the subject 
matter with more thorough coverage of the principles involved. The student is 
expected to conduct himself or herself as a graduate student and to devote free 
time to areas of his or her special interests. 

General Faculty Rules 

The University authorities reserve the right to make changes in the curriculum, 
the requirements for advancement and graduation, fees, and in rules and regula- 
tions whenever appropriate. 

Students who report for classes later than one week after scheduled time will 
be permitted to begin work only by permission of the Dean. 

Attendance at all scheduled classes is expected. 

Notice of change of address should be submitted promptly to the Dean's 
Office and to the Registrar's Office. 

Grading System 

Official grades are designed by these symbols: 

"3", "2", and "1" — in rank from highest to lowest 
P — satisfactory completion of course 
F — failure 
I — incomplete 
C — condition 
Students will receive a grade for the various disciplines in the manner outlined 
below : 

Anatomy 

Biochemistry 

Physiology 

Microbiology 

Pharmacology 

Pathology \ 3, 2, 1, F, I, C 

Psychiatry 

Surgery 

Medicine 

Pediatrics 

Ob-Gyn 

Neurology 

Radiology 

Ophthalmology \ P, F, I, C 

Anesthesiology 

Preventive Medicine 

Advancement and Graduation 

At the end of each academic year the Advancement Committee convenes to 
review the records of all students in each class. The estimate of a student's 
standing is based on academic achievement, his moral and ethical traits, and 
general evaluation of his fitness for a career in medicine. The committee recom- 
mends appropriate action to the Faculty Board. 

1. All students will be required to take the comprehensive National Board 
Examinations, Parts I and II, and they will be expected to pass the examinations 
to be advanced from the second to the third year or to graduate, respectively. 

2. Students in all courses in which National Board Examinations are given will 



University of Maryland • 11 

receive provisional grades of "3", "2", "1", Condition (C), or Failure (F). Only 
those students who have "3", "2", or "1" on the first year courses and no "F's" 
in the second year courses will be eligible to take the National Board Examina- 
tion, Part I. Only those students who have passed Part I, receive "3", "2", or 
"1" in the third year courses and no "F's" in the fourth year courses will be 
eligible to take the National Board Examination, Part II. 

3. Students with "C's" in the second and fourth year courses may, at the 
discretion of the department head, remove the "C" by re-examination or by 
passing the National Board Examination in the subject in which they are de- 
ficient. 

4. Students with a "C" in any first or third year course must remove the "C" 
by re-examination before being eligible for promotion to the second or fourth 
year. 

5. Final grades will be assigned in those courses for which National Board 
Examinations are given only when the National Board Examinations are passed 
and will be 3, 2, 1. 

6. Students who fail the National Board Examinations by National Board 
standards will receive a "C" in those subjects in which the score is lower than 75. 

7. A rating of "C" obtained as a result of failing the National Board Examina- 
tions must be removed prior to advancement from one year to the next or grad- 
uation by re-examination in the conditioned subject. 

8. No student will be advanced on probation. 

9. Students who fail re-examinations will be given an "F" and any student 
receiving more than one "F" in a major course in any one year will be dismissed 
from the school. 

Students with one failure or one failure plus one or more conditions, at the 
discretion of the Advancement Committee, may be allowed to remove the "F" 
by repetition of the course, the semester, the entire year at Maryland or the 
course at any school satisfactory to the department head, or may be dismissed. 

Students who repeat a year and who do not show significant improvement in 
all courses may, at the discretion of the Advancement Committee, be dismissed. 

10. When circumstances beyond the student's control make it impossible for 
him to complete a course at the usual time, he will be given an Incomplete (I) 
until such time as he has completed the course. An "I" is in no way prejudicial 
to the final rating or grade of the student in the course, but must be removed 
prior to promotion to the next year. 

1 1 . The faculty reserves the right to determine if a student may withdraw, re- 
peat, advance, or graduate on academic or moral and personal grounds, in- 
cluding traits of character. 

12. All discretionary actions of the Advancement Committee are subject to 
ratification by the Faculty Board and must be presented to them at their next 
meeting. 

Certification for State Board Examinations 

Students at the end of their second and fourth years will be certified to the 
State Board of Examiners if they have successfully completed the requirements 
for promotion to the third year or for graduation. 

Attendance at Graduation 

All students are required to attend graduation. Permission to receive the degree 
in absentia must be obtained in advance from the Dean. 




JOHN H. MOXLEY, III, M.D., DEAN 



Additional Educational Programs 



Baccalaureate Degree 

Selected students entering the School of Medicine from colleges which usually 
grant a baccalaureate degree after the successful completion of the first year 
of medicine, are responsible for: a) providing a certificate from his college or 
university that he is eligible for this degree, and b) meeting all requirements 
of the School of Medicine for advancement to the second year. 

Graduate Program 

Graduate courses and research opportunities leading to advanced degrees are 
available in most of the basic science departments of the School of Medicine. 
Students pursuing graduate work must register in the Graduate School of the 
University of Maryland and meet the same requirements as other graduate stu- 
dents. Detailed information concerning fees, scholarships, and other material 
of general nature, may be found in the University publication titled An Adven- 
ture in Learning. This may be obtained from the Office of University Relations, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Combined Doctor of Philosophy — Doctor of Medicine Program 

Properly qualified medical students may elect to enter the combined educa- 
tional program leading to Doctor of Medicine and a graduate degree. Such stu- 
dents may arrange a leave of absence of up to three years at the end of their 
second or third year in medical school to become candidates for either M.S. or 
Ph.D. in one of the basic medical sciences. Before entering the combined pro- 
gram, students must meet the requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School and be acceptable to the department of their choice as a candidate for 
an advanced degree. 

Internships and Residencies 

The University of Maryland Hospital offers the following graduate specialty 
training programs for interns and residents. These programs are approved by 
the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical As- 
sociation. 

The Hospital participates in the National Intern Matching Program to fill its 
35 approved intern positions. The program includes rotating internships 
and straight internships in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and pathology. 
Approved residency programs are offered in the following specialty areas: 
Department of Medicine: Internal Medicine, Dermatology, Family Prac- 
tice. 

13 



14 • School of Medicine 

Department of Surgery: General Surgery, Neurological Surgery, Orthopedic 
Surgery, Thoracic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Urology 
Department of Pediatrics: Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy 
Department of Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry 
Department of Anesthesiology: Anesthesiology 
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology: Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Department of Pathology: Pathology 
Department of Radiology: Radiology 
Department of Neurology: Neurology 

Department of Preventive Medicine: Physical Medicine and Rehabilita- 
tion 
Department of Ophthalmology: Ophthalmology 
In total, approximately 225 resident positions are offered. 
Appointments to intern and resident positions are made by the Director of 
the Hospital upon the recommendations of the House Staff Committee of the 
Medical Board or, in the case of residents, upon the recommendations of the 
appropriate Clinical Department Head. Correspondence and applications should 
be addressed to: 

THE DIRECTOR 

University of Maryland Hospital 
Redwood and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Additional Education Programs 

Research training in international health is accomplished through the mechan- 
ism of a Research Associate program under the Institute of International Medi- 
cine. This program provides for post-doctoral training in research on a broad 
spectrum of health problems of developing nations. 






Tuition, Fees and Registration 



Current Fees 

Application Fee $ 7.50 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) 10.00 

Tuition — Resident of Maryland 750.00 

Tuition — Non-Residents 1,150.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Student Activities Fee 23.50 

Student Health Fee 10.00 

*Student Union Fee 30.00 

**Special Fee 25.00 

National Board Examination Fee 

Second year students 10.00 

Fourth year students 15.00 

***Hospital Insurance (Blue Cross) 

Individual Plan 33.84 

Family Plan 117.12 

The application fee should be submitted with the formal application to medical 
school. A deposit on tuition of $50 is required of all applicants before the ex- 
piration date specified in the offer of acceptance. The deposit on tuition will be 
credited against first semester charges. In the event of withdrawal before regis- 
tration, the advanced deposit will be returned on request, if requested before 
March 1. 

Registration 

For the fall semester, all students, after proper certification, are requested to 
complete a set of registration cards to be obtained from the Office of the 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. All students are expected to complete their 
registration, including the payment of bills on the registration days. Those who 
do not complete their registration on the prescribed days will be charged a fee 
of $20.00. 

*The Student Union Fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
' cost of construction of the Union Building. 

**The Special Fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to finance equipment for the Union 
Building. 

***Membership of the student in Blue Cross or any other acceptable hospital 
insurance is required. Each student must produce certified proof of such member- 
ship at the time of registration. Rates are subject to change. 

15 



16 • School of Medicine 

One-half of the tuition fee and all of the following — the laboratory fee, the 
student health fee, the student union fee, the National Board Examination fee, 
the special fee, and the student activities fee are payable on the date specified 
for registration for the first semester. Blue Cross Hospitalization for six months 
in advance is paid at the beginning of each semester. 

The remainder of the tuition fee shall be paid on the date designated for the 
payment of fees for the second semester. Fourth year students shall pay the 
graduation fee, in addition, at this time. 

Any enrolled student may request at registration the postponement of payment 
of one half his tuition charges (but not fees) for 30 days. This service is interest 
free and requires only the student's promise to pay by that date. 

Non-payment of Fees 

If semester fees are not paid in full on the specified registration dates, a penalty 
of $20.00 will be added. 

If a satisfactory settlement or an agreement for settlement is not made with 
the business office within ten days after a payment is due, the student auto- 
matically is debarred from attendance at classes and will forfeit the other privi- 
leges of the School of Medicine. 

Re-examination Fee 

A student who is eligible for re-examinations must secure a bill in the amount 
of $5.00 from the Registrar's Office, make payment to the Cashier for each 
subject in which he is to be examined, and present the receipt to the faculty 
member giving the examination before he will be permittd to take the examina- 
tion. 

Student Activities Fund 

This fund supports all student activities and is budgeted by the Student Council 
in accordance with its own by-laws. All expenditures from this fund must be 
approved by the Student Council. The fund supports the student recreational 
and social program, representation at national conventions for certain student 
organizations, the cost of registration in the National Internship Matching Pro- 
gram as well as other activities. A portion of the fund is allocated to the year- 
book and provides each medical student with a copy of this publication. On 
registration all students are given a copy of The Student Handbook containing 
The Honor Code and The By-Laws of the Honor Council together with the 
By-Laws of the Student Council. 

Withdrawals and Refunds 

Students desiring to leave the School of Medicine at any time during the 
academic year are required to file with the Dean a letter of resignation. The 
student must satisfy the authorities that he has no outstanding obligations to the 
school and must return his Student Identity Card and Matriculation Card. 

If these procedures are not completed, the student will not be entitled to 
honorable dismissal nor to refund of fees. 



University of Maryland • 17 

Students under 21 years of age must supplement the procedures previously 
described with the written consent of their parents or guardians. 

ACADEMIC STANDING ON WITHDRAWAL 

Students who voluntarily withdraw during an academic semester will be given 
no credit. 

Students are not permitted to resort to withdrawal in order to preclude current 
or impending failures. Their standing on withdrawal will be recorded in the 
Registrar's Office. 

Students who withdraw from the School of Medicine, and later desire read- 
mission, must apply to the Committee on Admissions, unless other arrangements 
have been consumated with the Dean's written consent. 

REFUNDS ON WITHDRAWAL 

Students who are eligible to honorable dismissal will receive a refund of cur- 
rent charges, after the matriculation fee has been deducted, according to the 
following schedule: 



PERIODS ELAPSED AFTER INSTRUCTION BEGINS 



PERCENTAGE 
REFUNDABLE 



Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

After five weeks 

Leave of Absence 

Students who are in good standing may be granted one year's leave of absence 
on request to the Dean. Longer leaves can be arranged only under special cir- 
cumstances except those students in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. program. 



Required Equipment 



At the beginning of the first year, all freshmen must possess a complete set 
of dissecting instruments similar to the one on display in the bookstore. In ad- 
dition, they must provide themselves with microscopes equipped with a mechani- 
cal stage and a substage lamp. Microscopes must meet the standards described 
below. 

A standard monocular or binocular microscope such as made by Bausch & 
Lomb, Leitz, Zeiss, Reichert, or American Optical Company fitted with the 
following attachments, meets the requirements: 



18 • School of Medicine 

16 mm., lOx, 0.25 N.A. — 4.9 mm. working distance. 
4 mm., 43x, 0.65 N.A. — 0.6 mm. working distance. 
1.8 mm., 97x, oil immersion, 1.25 N.A. — 0.13 mm. working distance. 
Oculars: lOx and 5x. Huygenian eyepieces. 
A scanning objective is optional, but often proves to be of great value. 

The microscope should also be equipped with a wide aperture stage with 
detachable ungraduated mechanical stage, a substage condenser, variable focus- 
ing type 1.25 N.A. with iris diaphragm (a rack and pinion focusing device is 
preferred), and a mirror which is plane on one side, and concave on the other. 
A carrying case is recommended. 

Students are cautioned with respect to the purchase of used or odd-lot 
microscopes since some of the older instruments are in poor optical or mechani- 
cal condition, and, in addition, some are equipped with a 4 mm. (high dry) ob- 
jective whose N.A. is marked as 0.85. This objective has such a short working 
distance (0.3 mm.) that it is difficult or impossible to focus through thick cover 
glasses or the standard hemocytometer cover glass without breakage. 

All microscopes will be checked during the first scheduled laboratory in 
Microscopic Anatomy. 

Other instruments and equipment may be needed. The student will be in- 
formed of these needs by the department involved at an appropriate time. 

Students in the second year class are also expected to provide themselves with 
short white lapel coats. Three button, 8-ounce sanforized duck coats are satis- 
factory. 



Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, 
Loan Funds, and Student Employment 



Prizes 

THE FACULTY PRIZE 

The Faculty will award the Faculty Gold Medal and Certificate and five or 
more Certificates of Honor to those highest ranking candidates for graduation 
who, during the four academic years, have exhibited outstanding qualifications 
for the practice of medicine. 

THE BALDER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Each year a prize of $500 will be awarded for outstanding academic achieve- 
ment to a graduating senior. 

THE DR. J. EDMUND BRADLEY PRIZE 

Each year a prize of $100 is awarded to a graduating senior who has per- 
formed with special excellence in Pediatrics. This award is given in honor of 
Dr. Bradley, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics. 



University of Maryland • 19 

the dr. a. bradley gaither memorial prize 

A prize of $25, given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a memorial to 
the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, is awarded to the student in the fourth year 
class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

THE DR. LEONARD M. HUMMEL MEMORIAL AWARD 

A gold medal and Certificate of Proficiency will be awarded annually as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Leonard M. Hummel to the graduate selected by the 
Executive Committee of the Faculty who has manifested outstanding qualifica- 
tions in Internal Medicine. 

THE DR. HARRY M. ROBINSON, SR V PRIZE 

A prize of $25 is given each year in honor of Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr., late 
Professor Emeritus of Dermatology, to the member of the fourth year class 
selected by the Faculty who has done outstanding work in Dermatology. 

THE DR. JACOB E. FINESINGER PRIZE 

A prize of $100 is given each year in honor of Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, late 
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry, to the member of the 
fourth year class selected by the Faculty who has done outstanding work in 
Psychiatry. 

THE DR. MILTON S. SACKS MEMORIAL AWARD 

A prize of $100 is given each year in honor of Dr. Milton S. Sacks, late Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Hematology, to the member of the fourth year class 
selected by the Faculty who has performed with special excellence in Medicine 
and Hematology. 

THE DR. WAYNE W. BABCOCK PRIZE 

Each year a prize of $50 will be awarded to a graduating senior for outstand- 
ing work in Surgery as a memorial to Dr. Wayne W. Babcock. 

THE CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL CONFERENCE AWARD 

The junior or senior student who has performed most ably throughout the 
academic year in the diagnosis of clinical pathological conference cases will re- 
ceive an award of $50 and will have his name appropriately inscribed on a 
plaque in Gordon Wilson Hall. 

Financial Aid 

The supervision of financial aid for medical students rests with the Assistant 
Dean of Student Affairs, 103 Davidge Hall. In general, all University scholar- 
ships and most Federal scholarships and loans are awarded on an annual basis 
in July prior to the academic year. Relevant applications must be complete by 
June 1. A far smaller number of Federal scholarships, Federal loans, and Uni- 
versity loans are awarded in October and in January. 



20 • School of Medicine 

Scholarships 
ALL CLASSES 

FEDERAL HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

Members of the class may apply for Federal Scholarships awarded on the 
basis of need alone to "students of exceptional financial need who need such 
assistance to pursue a course of study." Those students eligible for such scholar- 
ships may anticipate a total educational indebtedness at the end of Medical 
School not substantially in excess of $5000. Such scholarships, which are re- 
newable after annual reassessment of both needs and resources, may be as high 
as $2500 per year. No Federal Scholarship will be awarded to students who do 
not also simultaneously request and receive a Federal Health Professions Loan. 

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GENERAL PRACTICE 

The State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 
21218, offers 10 scholarships each year in the amount of $1500 per year. Such 
awards, which are renewable annually, may be made to needy students antici- 
pating or having a bachelor's degree in the year of the award. The students must 
have been residents of Maryland for five years prior to the time of application. 
The awards, based on need and academic merit, will be given to students only 
if they sign a bond to "engage in the general practice of medicine for no less 
than three years in an area of need in the State of Maryland so designated by 
the State Health Department. . . ." Applications for these awards should be 
made directly to the State Scholarship Board; they must be submitted by April 1 
prior to the relevant academic year. 

AIR FORCE RESERVE REGULAR OFFICER PROGRAM 

Students who will be 26 years old or less when they enter Medical School 
and have or are capable of obtaining an Air Force Commission are eligible for a 
special program. Students selected in a nationwide competition will receive 
full pay and allowances as well as reimbursement for tuition, fees, equipment and 
books throughout their Medical School tenure. In repayment they must remain 
in the Air Force for two or three years for each year they receive such financial 
support. Detailed information shall be obtained as soon after acceptance as 
possible from USAFMPC (AF MSMB-4) Randolph AFB, Texas 78148. 

FOR FRESHMEN ONLY 

AVALON SCHOLARSHIP 

An Avalon Scholarship, with a stipend of $650, will be awarded to the mem- 
ber of the incoming freshman class who shows the greatest promise for a suc- 
cessful career in medicine. All accepted students are eligible whether resident 
or non-resident. Formal application is not necessary in that all admitted stu- 
dents are automatically considered. At the end of each academic year, the re- 
cipient's record will be reviewed by the Committee on Scholarships and Loans 
and the scholarship extended for another year if the record warrants. Any 



University of Maryland • 21 

recipient who does not stand at least in the upper third of the class may not be 
considered eligible for renewal. If an applicant is awarded an Avalon Scholar- 
ship, it is understood that during its tenure he will accept no outside remunera- 
tive employment during the school year without approval of the Office of the 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. 

WARFIELD FRESHMAN MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 

Five scholarships, each with a stipend of $650, are available to members of 
the first year class who are residents of Maryland and who have demonstrated 
outstanding potentiality for the study of medicine. Selection will be based on 
the credentials submitted in support of the applicant's request for admission. 
Formal application is not necessary in that all admitted students who are resi- 
dents are automatically considered. The committee reserves the right to withhold 
scholarship awards, if, in its opinion, there are no qualified applicants in any 
particular year. These scholarships are available to first year students only, and 
therefore are not renewable. Recipients may apply in later years for Medical 
School Scholarships open to upperclassmen. 

FOR UPPERCLASSMEN ONLY 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Over 50 University Scholarships are available to members of the three upper- 
classes with stipends ranging from $250-$ 1000 a year, with an average of about 
$500. Almost half of these scholarships are derived from the kind bequest of 
the estate of Dr. Michael Vinceguerra. All scholarships are awarded for one 
academic year and will be renewed only on application. Awards are made on a 
competitive basis with both academic proficiency and need as a major consid- 
eration. Students who do not qualify for scholarships may apply for student 
loans. 

Loans 

FEDERAL HEALTH PROFESSIONS STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

Significant financial assistance is available to all students in need from the 
Federal Health Professions Student Loan Program. Loans up to $2500 per year 
are repayable over a 10-year period, beginning one or more years after gradua- 
tion, subsequent to completion of internship and residency training. No interest 
is charged on the loans until the beginning of the repayment period, when a 
3% interest will be charged. 

UNIVERSITY LOANS 

Loans from a number of funds under direct Medical School control are avail- 
able to medical students who are in financial need. Application may be made 
at any time, although most applications are made and considered shortly before 
the beginning of the second semester. Except in unusual circumstances, loans 
from Medical School funds are limited to $400 a year. Such loans are awarded 
on the basis of need. Most loans are to be repaid in five equal installments with 
the first payment on the loan being due at the end of the fifth year following 
graduation. At that time simple interest of 3% begins to accrue. 



22 • School of Medicine 



AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION LOANS 



The American Medical Association will guarantee loans up to $1500 per year 
to medical students with 6.5% interest. Repayment must begin on the first day 
of the fifth month after completing training including internship and residency. 
Thereafter there will be a 7% interest charged on the unpaid balance. 

STUDENT COUNCIL EMERGENCY LOAN FUND 

rhe Student Council of the Medical School has established an Emergency 
Loan Fund for all medical students. When funds are available, loans are without 
interest, are limited to $400, and must be repaid within 120 days. 

Fellowships 

STUDENT RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS 

Over 100 Student Summer Research Fellowships are available annually upon 
application to the Committee on Scholarships and Loans or to the individual 
departments of the School of Medicine. A very limited number of student re- 
search fellowships are awarded for work during the academic year by selected 
departments. 

THE DR. JOHN B. WEAVER FELLOWSHIPS 

The Will of Dr. John B. Weaver, who died in 1929, authorized the Trustees 
of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland to establish fellowships 
in his name. Two such fellowships, each in the amount of $1500, will be awarded 
annually to applicants who as physicians are full time fellows in research or 
teaching in the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 

Student Employment 

Students engaging in outside work during the academic year must report 
such activities to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at the beginning of the 
school year or at anytime during the school year that such work is undertaken. 
Students of any class designated by an appropriate Advancement Committee 
to be in academic difficulty will not engage in part time employment without 
the approval of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. Students considering out- 
side employment in a clinical setting are encouraged to review carefully the 
opinion of the Law Department of the American Medical Association entitled 
"Employment of Medical Students as Externs." 



General Information 

Organizations 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

This Committee serves to coordinate and integrate the activities of all stu- 
dent groups and to act as liaison between the student body, the administration, 



University of Maryland • 23 

and the faculty. Members are: President of the Student Council, Class Presi- 
dents, Chairman of the Honor Council, President of the Student American 
Medical Association, President of the Interfraternity Council, President of 
Alpha Omega Alpha, President of the Women's Auxiliary to the Student Ameri- 
can Medical Association, Editor of the Yearbook, Editor of the Asclepian, 
Chairman of the Student Health Organization, Chairwoman of the Omega Mu 
Sorority, Treasurer of the Medical Student Council, and Class Presidents of 
the Junior and Senior Department of Physical Therapy. The Assistant Deans 
and those faculty members appointed by the Faculty Board are also members. 

A subcommittee, Student-Faculty Council meets periodically to discuss topics 
of special interest to the medical community. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

Each year the student body elects the Student Council which formulates and 
directs policies and activities of the student body and makes appropriate recom- 
mendations to the proper authorities. It is also responsible for disbursement of 
student activities fund, arranges the social program for the year, and maintains 
liaison with the Student Union Board. 

HONOR COUNCIL 

The Honor Council, elected by the Student Body, is responsible for the inter- 
pretation and execution of the Honor Code. Acceptance of the provisions and 
obligations of this Code is required of all students entering the Medical School. 

BALTIMORE STUDENT UNION BOARD 

The Board is a representative body of those students who live in the Student 
Union. The Medical Student Council maintains liaison with the Board. 

STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

This organization is designed to prepare the future physician for full par- 
ticipation in the field of Medicine. Furthermore, the active chapter is respons- 
ible for student liaison with high school and college groups, for publication of 
the bimonthly Asclepian, and for other important and educational and service 
activities of value to individual students. The Asclepian covers Medical School 
news including the latest developments in areas of concern to medical students 
and faculty. 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Women's Auxiliary helps wives and medical students prepare themselves 
for their future responsibilities as wives of physicians. It has promoted closer 
association among the student wives, both with each other and with wives of 
faculty members and participating physicians. The Auxiliary actively partici- 
pates in many functions for the betterment of the Medical School, including 
supervision of the used microscope and book sale. 

OMEGA MU 

The women students in School of Medicine recently organized their own 
sorority. Faculty and students are provided a social atmosphere to exchange 





m 




DAVIDGE HALL 



University of Maryland • 25 

ideas of mutual interest. Functions include guest dinner speakers, special pro- 
gram for incoming freshmen and lectures for entire student body. 

STUDENT HEALTH ORGANIZATION 

Baltimore Chapter was formed by medical, nursing, dental, and social work 
students at the University of Maryland with the basic tenet that health profes- 
sion students have an objective to work together within the community. Com- 
munity health projects are undertaken. 

THE YEARBOOK 

The Yearbook, Terra Mariae Medicus, which covers all the facets of student 
activities, is compiled by the students. Originating as Bones, Molars, and Briefs, 
the Yearbook has provided a continuous record of graduating classes as far 
back as 1896. It is the outstanding record of student life. The cost of the Year- 
book is included in the Student Activities Fee; hence, all medical students are 
entitled to receive a copy annually without further charge. 

STUDENT COUNCIL INTRAMURAL ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

Each year the Student Council sponsors an intramural athletic program which 
consists of competition, generally interclass, in touch football, basketball, softball, 
and tennis. Furthermore, a faculty-student softball game is a feature of the an- 
nual Medical Student Council Spring Picnic. 

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The purpose of the Council is to further the interests and improve the co- 
ordination and cooperation of the member groups. Each fraternity is represented 
by its President and Social Chairman. One of these representatives is chosen 
President for the school year on a rotating basis. 

The Interfraternity Council organizes the Freshmen Orientation Program. 

Alpha Omega Alpha: National Honorary Medical Society 

The Beta chapter of Maryland was established at the University of Maryland 
in 1949. Medical students possessing outstanding qualities of moral integrity, 
scholarship, and leadership are elected to membership in their third or fourth 
years. The Society sponsors an annual lectureship, a forum for the presenta- 
tion of medical student research, and chapter meetings on topics of social, edu- 
cational, and philosophical interest to medical students and faculty. 

Student Health Service 

Wilfred H. Townshend, M.D Director 

The Baltimore Campus of the University maintains a health service facility on 
the first floor of Howard Hall (660 W. Redwood St.) Office hours are from 
7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., exclusive of Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Dur- 



26 • School of Medicine 

ing emergencies or on weekends, holidays and at night, health service physicians 
may be called or students may report to the Accident Room, if absolutely 
necessary. 

At the beginning of the entering year, each student will be given a physical 
examination. The passing of this examination is a requirement for the final ac- 
ceptance of any student. Consultations and operations are arranged through the 
health service when necessary. X-rays and laboratory studies, unless specifically 
ordered by the Student Health Service, will be made at the student's expense. 
All students are required to carry hospitalization insurance equivalent to Blue 
Cross and it is strongly recommended that all students be covered by Blue 
Shield or its equivalent to cover physicians' and surgeons' fees. 

It is not the function of the Health Service to treat chronic conditions con- 
tracted by students before admission or to extend treatment for acute conditions 
arising in the period between academic years, unless the Health Service recom- 
mends it. Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering school in order to prevent loss of time which later 
correction might incur. Insofar as possible students will be given necessary 
medications for treatment of their illnesses if such medications are available. 
Those students requiring dental care through the year and who do not have 
their own dentist available, will, upon request, be referred to the dental clinic 
for treatment. At this time there is no infirmary connected with the Student 
Health Service. Students requiring such treatment will either have to be hos- 
pitalized or sent to their homes. 

Housing 

The Baltimore Union Building for students of the Professional Schools is 
located adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 W. Lombard Street. Ac- 
commodations for 195 men are provided in a five-story, semi-air conditioned 
building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, 
machine laundry facilities, billiard - ping-pong room, bookstore and barber 
shop; there are lounges on each floor. 

All rooms are double occupancy. No single rooms are available. The rental 
agreement is made for the rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a 
cash basis. The contract for the accommodations covers the academic year. 
The rates are: 

$180.00 per semester per person 

$ 80.00 per eight week summer session per person. 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: Room fur- 
nishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, bookshelves, desk, 
medicine cabinet, desk chair, and desk lamp. Maid service will include cleaning 
of room twice per week and replacement of change of linen once each week. 
Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone 
Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. Information 
can be obtained from the Director's Office. Mail service is also provided. Towels 
and linens must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 
Residents may either provide their own pillow and blankets or rent them from 
the linen service. A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of any- 
thing other than luggage will not be available. 



University of Maryland • 27 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union Building 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

There are no University housing facilities in Baltimore available for women. 

Diplomas 

Members of the Senior Class must fill out an "Application for Diploma Form." 

Commencement 

All graduating seniors are required to attend the Pre-commencement and 
Commencement ceremonies unless excused in writing by the Dean. 



Buildings and Facilities 

Davidge Hall 

This hall, at 522 West Lombard Street, is named after the first dean, Dr. John 
Beale Davidge, and was the first building of the medical school to be erected. 
It was completed in 1812 and is a replica of the Pantheon in Rome. It is the 
oldest structure in this country from which the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
has been granted annually since its erection. It is located at the N.E. corner of 
Lombard and Greene Streets and houses the offices of the Dean, and his staff, 
the Committee on Admissions, the Postgraduate Committee, Medical Alumni 
Office, in addition to Chemical and Anatomical Halls. 

Administration Building 

520 West Lombard Street contains facilities of the Department of Physical 
Therapy. 

Bressler Research Laboratory 

The Frank C. Bressler Research Laboratory at 29 S. Greene Street, a memorial 
to a generous alumnus, was completed in 1940. 

It houses the Department of Anatomy in addition to the research facilities 
of the departments of Medicine and Surgery, animal quarters, the Bressler 
Memorial Room, and the Baltimore Offices of the Board of Regents and the 
President of the University. 

Gray Laboratory 

This building houses research laboratories of the various Clinical Departments 
and offices of the Department of Physical Therapy. 

Howard Hall 

660 West Redwood Street houses the Departments of Biochemistry, Bio- 
physics, Cell Biology and Pharmacology, Microbiology, Pathology, and Physi- 
ology in addition to the Health Sciences Computer Center and the Central Ani- 
mal Quarters of the School of Medicine. In this building also are located the 
Baltimore Office of the Registrar and Cashier, the Office of Admissions, and 
various other administrative offices of the Schools on the Baltimore Campus. 

Medical Technology Building 

31 South Greene Street houses some of the offices and laboratories of the 
Department of Pathology, offices of the Department of Preventive Medicine, 
and research laboratories of the Department of Pediatrics. 

28 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HOSPITAL 



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32 • School of Medicine 
University of Maryland Hospital 

The University of Maryland Hospital is part of the University of Maryland. 
It is one of the oldest institutions for the care of the sick in the State of Mary- 
land. It was opened in September 1823, under the name of the Baltimore In- 
firmary and at that time consisted of only four wards, one of which was re- 
served for patients with diseases of the eye. 

In 1933-1934 the present Hospital was erected with a capacity of 435 beds 
and 65 bassinets. In 1952-1953 a modern Psychiatric Institute Building was 
erected and a junctional wing was added to the general hospital. New addi- 
tions have increased the hospital bed capacity to 648 beds and 70 bassinets 
devoted to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and the 
various medical and surgical specialties. All hospital accommodations, whether 
private, semiprivate, ward, or specialized, are available to the teaching programs. 

The hospital buildings are situated opposite the Medical School buildings. 
The students, therefore, are in close proximity to the clinical facilities of the 
Hospital. The hospital is the major clinical teaching facility of the Medical 
School. 



EMERGENCY SERVICE 

The Emergency Service of the hospital receives and treats a large number 
of emergency cases because of its proximity to the largest manufacturing and 
shipping districts of the city. During the past fiscal year a total of approximately 
48,000 patients were treated in the Emergency Room. 

OUT PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

The Out Patient Department is in the old University Hospital. It provides 
space and facilities for more than fifty clinics, the departments of X-ray, a 
pharmacy, laboratory, and other ancillary services. Admission policies are predi- 
cated upon the teaching requirements of the School of Medicine and the ward 
services of the Hospital. 

Visits to the various clinics of the Out Patient Department during the last 
fiscal year totaled approximately 135,000. 

Health Sciences Library 

The Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, and Social Work 
are served by the Health Sciences Library in a modern, four-story library build- 
ing completed in 1960. The oldest part of the library collection dates back to 
1813 when the University of Maryland purchased the books of Dr. John Craw- 
ford to form a medical library. The present library contains more than 120,500 
bound volumes and regularly receives over 2,700 scientific periodicals. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and the 
Welch Medical Library of the Johns Hopkins University are open to students 
of the School of Medicine without charge. Other libraries of Baltimore are the 
Peabody Library and the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 




HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 



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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY BUILDING 



University of Maryland • 35 
Library Staff 

ROVELSTAD, Howard, Director of Libraries and Professor of Library Science; 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 

1940. 
♦ROBINSON, Ida Marian, Librarian Emeritus; A.B., Cornell University, 1924; 

B.S.L.S., Columbia University School of Library Service, 1944. 
♦MOORE, Hilda E., Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science; A.B., 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; A.B.L.S., Emory University Library 

School, 1937. 
*COYLE, Edith M., Assistant Librarian for Technical Services; A.B., University of 

North Carolina, 1937; A.B.L.S., University of North Carolina School of Library 

Science, 1939; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 
♦MITTEN, Eleanor M., Assistant Librarian for Readers' Services; B.S., Cornell 

University, 1942; B.S.L.S., Syracuse University School of Library Science, 1949. 
BROOKMAN, Patricia C, Acquisitions Assistant 
CANNON, Carole N., Circulation Assistant 
CHAFFIN, Regina F., Cataloging Assistant 
DeFAY, Helen D., Acquisitions Assistant 
*De MANGE, Kathyrn K., Acquisitions Librarian; B.A., Fresno State College, 

1954; M.L.S., University of Maryland, 1967. 
DVORKIN, Bettifae E., Acquisitions Assistant; A.A., Community College of 

Baltimore, 1966. 
GRABER, Lynne B., Circulation-Reserve Book Room Assistant; B.A., University 

of Maryland, 1968. 
HANNA, Ruth E., Reference Librarian; A.B., Hanover College, 1939; M.S.L.S., 

Catholic University of America, 1961. 
HLAVIN, Lorraine S., Serials Assistant 
HOBGOOD, Ella M., Reference Assistant 
HOSAIN, Parvathi, Cataloger; B.Sc, Andhra University (India), 1948; M.Sc, 

Lucknow University (India), 1953; A.I.N.P., Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 

University of Calcutta (India), 1955; Dip. Lib., University of Calcutta (India), 

1959. 
JONES, Margaret M., Head, Cataloging Department; A.B., Shaw University, 1947; 

M.S.L.S., Atlanta University School of Library Service, 1951. 
KYLER, Cecilia J., Serials Assistant 

LEE, Clarice F., Head, Circulation Department; A.B., Morgan State College, 1950. 
LISTFELDT, Hans-Guenther R., Head, Serials Department; B.S., Loyola College, 

1956; M.S.L.S., Catholic University of America, 1961; Ph.L., 1967. 
LISTFELDT, Mary S., Head, Reference Department; B.A., New York State College 

for Teachers (Albany), 1944; B.L.S., University of Wisconsin Library School, 

1947. 
LOTZ, F. Gwendolyn, Circulation Assistant; R.N. (Canada), Hamilton (Ontario) 

General Hospital, 1932. 
O'BRIEN, Mary W., Cataloging Assistant 
PALMER, Elizabeth, Assistant to the Librarian 
ROMAN, Margaret M., Reference Assistant 

SNOWDEN, Claudine N., Reference Assistant; B.A., North Carolina College, 1944. 
STERLING, Elwood, Serials Assistant 
VARGAS, Beatriz, Acquisitions Assistant 
WILKINS, Henry, General Library Assistant 

WISOWATY, Evelyn C, Circulation Assistant; B.A., Westhampton College. Uni- 
versity of Richmond, 1942. 

^Certified Medical Librarian. 



Affiliated Institutions 



Mercy Hospital 

Mercy Hospital traces its history to the foundation of the Washington School 
of Medicine in 1824. In 1872 some of the members of this institution founded 
a new school, which was the beginning of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Baltimore. 

Washington School of Medicine opened a dispensary and a small hospital 
at the corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets and named it the Baltimore City 
Hospital. This building served both as a hospital and a medical school. In 1874 
the Sisters of Mercy, upon the invitation of Washington School of Medicine, 
assumed responsibility for the Nursing Services of the hospital. In 1876, Wash- 
ington University merged with the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

In 1888 the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, began construction of a new hospital adjacent 
to the earlier buildings. In 1909, the name of the institution was changed to 
"Mercy Hospital." 

Many additions have been made to the physical plant over the years. The 
present twenty-one story, modern hospital building opened in 1963. A new 
gastroenterological research laboratory was completed in 1965. A center for 
gastrointestinal endoscopy has also been established. 

The hospital is very active in the teaching program of the medical school. 
Faculty members serve as fulltime heads of medicine, surgery, pediatrics and 
obstetrics/gynecology. Medical students rotate through the Mercy Hospital 
clinical services during the second, third and fourth years. 

During the year ending December 31, 1968, there were 10,794 general 
admissions, 21,807 dispensary visits, 1,530 obstetrical deliveries, and 21,881 
emergency visits in the Accident Department. 

The bed capacity is 334 plus 36 bassinets. All hospital beds are available 
for teaching purposes, 71 of them specifically as service beds. A School of 
Nursing, a School of Medical Technology, and a School of X-Ray Technology 
are conducted in conjunction with the hospital. 

The James Lawrence Kernan Hospital and Industrial School of 
Maryland for Crippled Children 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres near Dickeyville. The 
site is within the northwestern city limits and of easy access to the city proper. 

Its facilities are used to teach pediatric orthopedics to medical students and 
house officers. 

A hospital unit, complete in every respect, offers all modern facilities for the 
care of an orthopedic condition in children and adults. 

36 




MERCY HOSPITAL 



38 • School of Medicine 

The hospital is equipped with 120 beds — endowed, and city and state sup- 
ported. The orthopedic dispensary at the University Hospital is maintained in 
closest affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from the Kernan Hospital. 
The Physical Therapy Department is very well equipped with modern appara- 
tus and trained personnel. Occupational therapy has been fully established and 
developed under trained technicians. 

Baltimore City Hospitals 

This is the only municipal hospital in Baltimore and has a bed capacity of 
1,726. The departments of the hospital are: Anesthesiology, Chronic and 
Community Medicine, Dentistry, Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Path- 
ology, Pediatrics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Psychiatry, Radiology. 
Surgery, and Tuberculosis. 

The acute hospital has 425 beds and is devoted to the usual medical activ- 
ities. The chronic hospitals, where physical rehabilitation is emphasized on all 
patients, are devoted to chronic and degenerative diseases, as well as tubercu- 
losis. The Baltimore City Hospitals is also a major center for research in 
Gerontology and Oncology. 

There is a strong affiliation between the School of Medicine and the Depart- 
ments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Anesthesiology, Radiology, Medicine, 
Surgery, and Pediatrics. The heads of these departments as well as the clinical 
instructors are members of the University of Maryland School of Medicine 
faculty. They participate not only in teaching medical students, but are active in 
the planned programs for house staff education. The practical teaching of 
Obstetrics is carried out in this institution, while partial instruction in several 
areas of Medicine, Anesthesiology, Surgery, and Pediatrics are under the direc- 
torship of the respective clinical department heads. 

Maryland General Hospital 

The Maryland General Hospital began humbly about 1883 at a location on 
Linden Avenue, north of Madison Street, with a capacity of 50 beds. Five years 
later, a college building (The Baltimore Medical College), was erected on 
Madison Street and a maternity service known as The Maryland-Lying-in 
Hospital opened on Linden Avenue contiguous to the main building. Three 
years later the Dental Building followed. 

Early in 1911 came a radical change. The Baltimore Medical College, includ- 
ing its College of Dentistry, was consolidated with the University of Maryland. 
This left portions of two buildings tenantless and functionless. Then came three 
Methodist groups, federating their purses and courage in purchasing and oper- 
ating a hospital. 

Two campaigns for funds, two years apart, met a heartening response from 
people of all faiths. Debts were extinguished and mortgage bonds retired. 
Property improvements began on a large scale. Both buildings were soundly 
converted to hospital uses. 

In 1921 a successful campaign was completed to construct a modern nurses' 
home. 

In July, 1954, a contract was entered into for the creation of a seven story 
building — the first phase of the building program — and was dedicated in Decern- 



University of Maryland • 39 

ber, 1956. The new building made possible the demolition of the old buildings. 
The second phase of the program was completed in November, 1962. 

The present bed complement is 385 plus 40 bassinets. In addition to increas- 
ing the bed capacity, construction of modern laboratories, recovery room, sur- 
gery, and x-ray departments, the new departments of an intensive care unit, a 
radioisotope laboratory, and cardio-pulmonary function laboratories were in- 
corporated into this facility. 

For the year 1965-1966, there were 13,422 admissions, 8,225 surgical pro- 
cedures, and 1,931 obstetrical deliveries. 

The new seven-story Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat building is now completed 
and functioning, together with a new Central Supply Room, Pharmacy, Pedi- 
atric Department and a twenty-three bed Coronary and Intensive Care Unit; 
thus increasing our bed capacity to 450 beds. The Out Patient Department 
can accommodate in excess of 20,000 visits per year. 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1968, there were 12,029 admissions and 
7,288 surgical procedures. 

Eye Research Foundation of Bethesda 

The Eye Research Foundation is affiliated with the Department of Ophthal- 
mology, and is located at 8710 Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda. Research 
and clinical facilities are used for research programs. 



Historical Sketch 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland, the fifth medical 
school to be founded in the United States, filled a great need for such an institu- 
tion in the Baltimore area. On December 18, 1807, the General Assembly of 
the State of Maryland passed "An Act for Founding a Medical College in the 
City or Precincts of Baltimore for the Instruction of Students in the different 
Branches of Medicine.'" The philosophy of the founding fathers and the princi- 
ples upon which the school was established have not changed. This is aptly 
expressed in the opening paragraphs of the Founding Act: "WHEREAS 
... it appears to the General Assembly that many benefits would accrue, not 
only to the State of Maryland but to many other parts of the United States, 
from the establishment of a seminary for the promotion of medical knowledge 
in the City of Baltimore, therefore, Be It Enacted . . . That a College ... by 
the name of The College of Medicine of Maryland, be established . . . upon 
the following fundamental principles. . . . The said College shall be founded 
and maintained forever upon a most liberal plan, for the benefit of students of 
every country and every religious denomination, who shall be freely admitted 
to equal privileges and advantages of education, and to all the honors of the 



40 • School of Medicine 

College, according to their merit, without requiring or enforcing any religious or 
civil tests." 

The direction of the College of Medicine was vested in a Board known as 
"The Regents of the College" comprising the Board of Medical Examiners, the 
President, and Professors of the College. 

Dr. John Beale Davidge was selected as the first dean of the school. Under 
his farsighted leadership the original faculty formulated a new concept of 
medical education: "The science of medicine could not be successfully taught 
under the usual organization of medical schools; that without the aids of physi- 
ology and pathology, either associated with anatomy or as a separate chair of 
institutes, the philosophy of the body in sickness or in health could not be 
understood." 

The first session of the College was not complete and lectures were delivered 
in the homes of Dr. Davidge, other members of the faculty, and at the Alms- 
house. From the beginning the School was fortunate in having patients at the 
Almshouse for use in bedside teaching. 

The first recorded public graduation was in 1810 with five graduates listed, 
three from Maryland and two from Virginia. 

At the end of 1807 there was, in Baltimore, a medical college with officers 
and faculty but no buildings or money. A lottery was authorized in the amount 
of $10,000, which was subsequently increased to $40,000. The faculty contrib- 
uted what it could and interested citizens helped to raise funds with which to 
begin the school and provide for its maintenance. 

The location selected for the College of Medicine was the northeast corner 
of Lombard and Greene Streets on property owned by Col. John Eager Howard 
of Revolutionary War fame. Mr. R. Cary Long, an eminent architect, drew 
plans for the beautiful replica of the Pantheon which stands today and houses 
the two old amphitheatres, the offices of the Dean, the Alumni Association, 
Postgraduate Committee, and other administrative offices. This building was first 
occupied late in the year of 1812. It is the oldest building in this country from 
which the degree of Doctor of Medicine has been granted annually since its 
erection. In this building one of the first medical school libraries in the United 
States was founded. 

The Faculty and Regents endeavored constantly to improve the curriculum 
and teaching facilities. New faculty members were secured and new methods 
were introduced in the school. Dr. John Crawford, one of the new faculty 
members, vaccinated Baltimoreans against smallpox during 1800, while Dr. 
Waterhouse was doing the same for citizens of Boston. As early as 1810 he 
presented evidence that tuberculosis was contagious. His personal library became 
the nucleus of the present Medical School Library. 

In 1812 the General Assembly authorized founding of the additional Schools 
of Law, Divinity, and Arts and Sciences. The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine was unique in the history of education, since the medical school 
preceded the undergraduate and other professional schools. 

The Baltimore Infirmary, the forerunner of the University Hospital, was built 
in 1823. The School was one of the first to have its own hospital for clinical 
instruction, and it was here that intramural residency for senior students was first 
established. 

There were many "firsts" through the years. The study of human anatomy 
was recognized as basic for the acquisition of medical knowledge, but dissection 



University of Maryland • 41 

was limited by the difficulty in obtaining bodies. The trustees recommended 
compulsory dissection as early as 1833, but the faculty did not enforce the 
recommendation until 1848, the first medical school in the country with such a 
requirement. Finally, enactment of the Anatomy Law provided unclaimed bodies 
to the medical schools for dissection (1882). At the College of Medicine of 
Maryland instruction was given in Dentistry (1837) and in the techniques of 
ausculation and percussion (1841) for the first time in America. In 1844 
Dr. David Stewart, the first professor of pharmacy in the United States, initi- 
ated his lectures at the School, and compulsory courses in Experimental Physi- 
ology and Microscopy were introduced in 1854. The first independent chairs for 
teaching Diseases of Women and Children (1867) and Diseases of the Eye and 
Ear (1873) were established. Systematic clinical instruction in Nervous Diseases 
was instituted in 1869. 

The Faculty and Regents recognized the need for medical education to in- 
clude areas other than the sciences. In 1891 a rule was adopted which required 
each student to complete successfully a preliminary examination in English 
before being admitted. 

At the time of the charter the course of instruction was only four months. In 
1848 it was increased to four and a half months and attendance at two sessions 
was required. In 1891 the period of instruction was increased to three years and 
in 1896 all Doctor of Medicine candidates were required to complete a four 
year course of instruction. 

Graduate programs were offered as early as 1860 and a special ten weeks 
summer course was given in 1870. These were the initial Postgraduate courses 
which have continued to the current era. 

Honorary degrees have been conferred upon outstanding persons on rare 
occasions. The honorary M.D. degree conferred upon Dr. Ephraim McDowell 
by the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1825 was his only degree. 
The Marquis de Lafayette was awarded the honorary degree of LL.D. during 
his visit to America in 1824. 

The University of Maryland School of Medicine enjoys a rich heritage be- 
queathed by two other medical schools and their affiliated hospitals. Mergers 
with the Baltimore Medical College in 1913 and the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1915 provided the University of Maryland School of Medicine with 
greatly expanded faculty and clinical facilities. 

The State University was established in 1920 when the professional schools in 
Baltimore merged with the Maryland State College of Agriculture at College 
Park, Maryland. The State of Maryland assumed the financial obligation of all 
of the schools. 

Throughout the many years since the Medical School's founding the prime 
emphasis has been placed on fitting men and women for the practice of medicine. 
Significant research contributions were made by many graduates although sys- 
tematic programs of experimentation received greater emphasis in the later years, 
especially since the erection of the Bressler Research Laboratory in 1939-1940. 

Women first entered the Medical School in 1921. There were six women in 
the 1922 class, two of whom completed the four year course of study. The 
School was integrated racially almost from the beginning and students of most 
races have completed the course of study and graduated. 



Administration 



BOARD OF REGENTS AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore 21202 

VICE CHAIRMAN 

George B. Newman 

The Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Box 300, Cumberland 21502 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Mrs. Gerald D. Morgan 
Route 3, Gaithersburg 20760 

ASSISTANT treasurer 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, One Charles Center, 17th Floor, Baltimore 21201 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

Harry Boswell Associates, 6505 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville 20782 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 21215 

William B. Long, M.D. 
Medical Center, Salisbury 21801 

F. Grove Miller, Jr. 

R. D. 1, Box 133, North East, Maryland 21901 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 20740 

42 



University of Maryland • 43 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Wilson H. Elkins, b.a., m.a., litt.b., d.phil. 
President 

ALBIN O. KUHN, B.S., M.S., PH.D. 

Chancellor, Baltimore Campuses 

John H. Moxley, III, a.b., m.d. 

Director, Medical Education and Research, and Dean 

George A. Lentz, Jr., a.b., m.d. 
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 

Karl H. Weaver, a.b., m.d. 
Assistant Dean for Admissions 

Donald W. Giffin, b.a., m.a., ph.d. 

Director of Admissions and Registrations 



Faculty Organization 



The Faculty Board of the School of Medicine is the governing and policy 
body of the School. The Faculty Board is composed of the Heads of all 
Departments, the Dean, Associate Deans and Assistant Deans, elected repre- 
sentatives from the faculty of each Department, the President and Secretary 
of the Medical Board of the University of Maryland Hospital, Heads of Divi- 
sions, and two alumni members. Faculty Board actions are carried into effect 
by the Executive Committee which is composed of the Dean, Associate and 
Assistant Deans, Department Heads, and four elected members of the faculty. 

The faculty of the School of Medicine elects members to represent it in the 
University Senate. 



44 



Faculty 



EMERITI 

BALLARD, Margaret B., m.d., Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emeritus 

BRADLEY, J. Edmund, m.d., Professor of Pediatrics, Emeritus 

HACHTEL, Frank W., m.d., Professor of Bacteriology, Emeritus 

JENNINGS, F. L., m.d., Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus 

KITLOWSKI, Edward Andrew, m.d., Clinical Professor of Plastic Surgery, Emeritus 

KRANTZ, John C, Jr., ph.d., Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus 

LOVE, William S., m.d., Professor of Clinical Medicine, Emeritus 

MUSSER, Ruth D., m.s., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus 

REESE, John Morris, m.d., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 

Emeritus 
SMITH, Dietrich C, ph.d., Professor of Physiology, Emeritus 
SPENCER, Hugh R., m.d., Professor of Pathology, Emeritus 
TOULSON, W. Houston, m.d., Professor of Urology, Emeritus 
VOSHELL, Allen Fisk, m.d., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus 
ZINN, Waitman F., m.d., Professor of Otolaryngology, Emeritus 

ACTIVE 

Anatomy 

FIGGE, Frank H. J., Professor and Head of the Department; B.A., Colorado 
College, 1927; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

BARRETT, Charles P., Instructor; B.S., King's College, 1957. 

BRANTIGAN, Otto C, Professor of Clinical Anatomy; B.S., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1931; M.D., 1934. 

BULMASH, Melvin H., Instructor; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1946; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1950. 

DONATI, Edward J., Assistant Professor; B.A., King's College, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1964. 

HEARN, John B., Lecturer; M.B., B.S., Middlesex Hospital, London, 1947; 
D.M.R.D., 1952; F.F.R., 1955. 

JENCI, Joseph D., Instructor; B.S., Elmhurst College, 1960; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1968. 

KRAHL, Vernon E., Professor; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1939; M.S., 1940; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 

LINHARDT, E. G., Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 

MASTERS, Jason M., Instructor; B.A., High Point College, 1951; M.S., Sul Ross 
State College, 1956; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

McFADDEN, Rorert B., Instructor; B.S., Loyola College, Baltimore, 1940; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

MECH, Karl Frederick, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1932; 
M.D., 1935. 

45 



46 • School of Medicine 

O'MORCHOE, Charles C. C, Associate Professor; B.A., Trinity College, 1953; 

M.A., Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland, 1959; M.D., 1961. 
PETERSEN, Kyle W., Assistant Professor; B.S., George Washington University, 

1964; M.S., 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 
PFEIFFER, C. Boyd, Assistant and Instructor; A.B., Gettysburg College, 1960. 
POLLEY, Edward H., Associate Professor; A.B., DePauw University, 1947; M.S., 

St. Louis University, 1949; Ph.D., St. Louis University, 1951. 
RAMSAY, Frederick J., Assistant Professor; B.S., Washington and Lee University, 

1958; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; Ph.D., 1962. 
RENNELS, Marshall L., Assistant Professor; B.S., Eastern Illinois University, 1961; 

M.A., University of Texas, 1964; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1966. 
WADSWORTH, Gladys E., Assistant Professor; B.S., State Teachers College, 1936; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

ADAMS, G. Kenneth PETRALI, John P. 

BARRETT, Charles P. PFEIFFER, C. Boyd 

BULMASH, Melvin H. SNYDER, Joel M. 

OLIVIER, Margaret L. 



Anesthesiology 



HELRICH, Martin, Professor and Head of the Department; B.S., Dickinson Col- 
lege, 1946; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 
BOCCUTI, Anthony R., Assistant Professor; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1957; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 
CASCORBI, Helmut F., Associate Professor; Can. Med. Tubingen, Germany, 

1954; M.D., University of Munich, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 
DEL ROSARIO, Romeo S., Clinical Instructor; A.B., Philippine Union College, 

1954; M.D., Manila Central University, 1958. 
GLASSMAN, Lionel, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Toronto, 1945. 
GLICK, Gina M., Instructor; Mundelein College; M.D., Stritch School of Medicine, 

1956. 
GOLD, Martin L, Professor; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1950; M.D., State 

University of New York College of Medicine, 1954. 
KAPLOW, Sheppard, Instructor; M.D., Dalhousie University, 1959. 
KELLER, Melvin L., Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Illinois, 1945; D.D.S., 

University of Detroit, 1948; M.D., University of Amsterdam, 1955. 
KENT, Y. Victor, Instructor; B.S., Science Faculty, University of Istanbul, 1947; 

M.D., University of Istanbul, 1951. 
LANDESMANN, Renee K., Instructor; Central College, 1955; M.D., Tulane 

University, 1961. 
LaVINA, Claro L., Clinical Instructor; A.A., University of Santo Tomas, 1955; 

M.D., University of Santo Tomas, 1960. 
LITEANU, Michael, Assistant Professor; M.D., Free University of Brussels, 1949. 
McASLAN, T. Crawford, Associate Professor; M.B., Ch.B., University of Glas- 
gow, 1945; D.A., Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College 

of Surgeons of England, 1961. 
NAVARRO, Roberto N., Clinical Instructor; A.B., University of the Philippines, 

1958; M.D., University of the Philippines, 1963. 
PARELHOFF, Merrill E., Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 

College of Pharmacy, 1944; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 
REDDING, Joseph S., Professor; A.B., University of North Carolina, 1943; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1948. 
SEEBERT, Calbert T., Assistant Professor; Virginia Military Institute, 1945; M.D., 

Jefferson Medical College, 1951. 



University of Maryland • 47 

SELVIN, Beatrice L., Associate Professor; B.A., University of Michigan, 1942; 

M.D., New York Medical College, 1945. 
SUSSMAN, Sylvia W., Instructor; B.A., Cornell University, 1949; M.D., University 

of Buffalo, 1960. 



Biological Chemistry 



ADAMS, Elijah, Professor and Head of the Department; B.A., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1938; M.D., University of Rochester, 1942. 
BESSMAN, Samuel P., Professor {part time); M.D., Washington University, 1944. 
BODE, Vernon C, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Missouri, 1955; Ph.D., 

University of Illinois (Urbana), 1961. 
BROWN, Ann Virginia, Instructor; A.B., Goucher College, 1940. 
FRANK, Leonard H., Associate Professor; B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1950; 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1957. 
GRYDER, Rosa M., Assistant Professor; B.S., Bucknell University, 1947; M.S., 

Yale University, 1949; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 
KIRTLEY, Mary E., Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Chicago, 1957; M.A., 

Smith College, 1958; Ph.D., Western Reserve, 1964. 
LaBROSSE, Elwood H., Assistant Professor; B.S., Northwestern University, 1945; 

M.S., 1948; M.D., 1949; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1956. 
POMERANTZ, Seymour H., Professor; B.A., Rice Institute, 1948; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Texas, 1952. 
TILDON, J. Tyson, Assistant Professor; B.S., Morgan State College, 1954; Ph.D., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1965. 

Research Associate 

CHANG, Yung-Feng, M.S., Ph.D. 



Fellows 

AIMONE, Anita, B.A. 
CHOU, Ta-Hsu, B.S. 
EBY, Sr. Denise, M.S. 
FINLAY, Thomas H., B.S. 
GOLDSTEIN, Aida, M.S. 
HARRISON, Dennis P., B.S. 



HEACOCK, Ann H., B.A. 
HINTON, Dennis, B.S. 
HOWELL, Stanley, A.B. 
KOO, Peter, B.A. 
LI, Jean, B.S. 
WONG, Emory, B.S. 



Biophysics 



MULLINS, Lorin J., Professor and Chairman of the Department; B.S., University 
of California, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

GEDULDIG, Donald S., Assistant Professor of Biophysics; B.E.E., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1955; M.S., Cornell University, 1957; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1965. 

HYBL, Albert, Assistant Professor; B.A., Coe College, 1954; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology, 1961. 

SJODIN, Raymond A., Professor; B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of California, 1955. 



Fellows 

ABELES, Ann L., B.A., Fellow 

DeWEER, Paul J., M.D., 

Postdoctoral Fellow 
DORSET, Douglas L., B.S , Fellow 
HOBBS, Ann S., B.S., Fellow 
KOPECKY, Walter J., Jr., 

B.S., Fellow 
PANGBORN, Walter A., B.S., Fellow 



PEARSON, Robert H., M.S., Fellow 
ROSEN, Lawrence S., B.S., Fellow 
SCHNEIDER, John C, B.A., Fellow 
WENTZEL, Mary C, B.A., Fellow 
WIDEMAN, James M., Ph.D., 

Postdoctoral Fellow 
WU, Shun Chung, M.S., Fellow 



48 • School of Medicine 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology 

APOSHIAN, H. Vasken, Professor and Head; B.S., Brown University, 1948; M.S., 

University of Rochester, 1950; Ph.D., 1953. 
BELL, Frederick K., Research Associate; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1916; 

Ph.D., 1920. 
BROWN, Neal C, Assistant Professor; D.V.M., Cornell University, New York 

State College of Veterinary Medicine, 1962; Ph.D., Yale University, 1966. 
DuPRAW, Ernest J., Jr., Associate Professor; B.S., University of Notre Dame, 

1953; M.S., Columbia University, 1955; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1958. 
LDULUM, David B., Associate Professor; B.S., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., 

Wisconsin, 1954; M.D., New York University, 1962. 
O'NEILL, John J., Associate Professor; B.S., St. Francis College, 1942; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1953; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 
RYSER, Hugues J. -P., Associate Professor; Swiss medical degree, University of 

Berne, 1953; M.D., University of Berne, 1955. 

Fellows, Research Assistants, and Associates 

BURNS, James P., Jr., Fellow 

BYRD, Daniel M., Ill, Postdoctoral Fellow 

ELSMORE, Trudy A., Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow 

KOH, Jai, M.D., Postdoctoral Fellow 

N1SH1HARA, Mutsuko, Ph.D., Instructor 

OSTERMAN, Joseph V., Jr., Postdoctoral Fellow 

POLLACK, Sylvia, Instructor 

SAKAMOTO, Tetsuhiko, M.D., Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow 

WADDELL, Anna D., Assistant 

International Medicine 

CLYDE, David F., Professor and Head of the Department; B.A., University of 
Kansas, 1946; M.D., McGill University, 1948; D.T.M.H., London School of 
Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 1952; Ph.D., University of London, 1963. 

ANTHONY, Ronald L., Assistant Professor; B.A., Susquehanna University, 1961; 
Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1965. 

ASLAM-KHAN, Mohammed, Assistant Professor; B.S., Punjab University, 1951; 
M.S., Punjab University, 1953; D.Sc, Johannes Gutenberg Universitat, 1963. 

AZIZ, Mohammed A., Clinical Associate Professor; M.B.B.S., Dacca University, 
1954; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1963. 

BAKER, Richard H., Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Illinois, 1958; M.S., 
University of Illinois, 1962; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1965. 

BARNETT, Herbert C, Professor and Director, Division of Medical Entomology 
and Ecology; B.S., Cornell University, 1939; M.S., University of Minnesota, 
1946; M.P.H., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 
1954. 

BARRY, Cornelius, Assistant Professor; B.S., St. John Fisher College; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1962; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1964. 

BEGUM, Fatima, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Karachi, 1958; M.S. : 
University of London, 1960; Ph.D., University of London, 1963. 

BOWDEN, George R., Research Programmer; B.S., Morgan State College, 1965. 

CANNER, Paul L., Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Minnesota, 1960; M.S., 
University of Minnesota, 1962; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1965. 

CAROZZA, Frank A., Jr., Assistant Professor; B.A., Lehigh University, 1958; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

CROUCH, Phillip A., Assistant; B.S., Indiana University, 1958. 



University of Maryland • 49 

DONNELLY, Michael J., Research Programmer; B.S., Mount St. Mary's College, 

1964. 
HEINER, Gordon G., Research Associate; A.B., Harvard University, 1948; M.A., 

School of Advanced International Studies, 1949; M.D., Temple University, 1965. 
HEINER, Jutta D., Research Associate PT; M.D., Free University of Berlin, 1963. 
HEINZ, Elizabeth C, Instructor; B.A., Goucher College, 1951. 
KLIMT, Christian R., Professor and Director, Division of Epidemiology and 

Biostatistics; M.D., University of Vienna, 1944; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1952; Dr.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1959. 
KNATTERUD, Genell L., Assistant Professor; B.A., Macalester College, 1952; 

M.S., University of Minnesota, 1959; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1963. 
KROL, William F., Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Chicago, 1958; M.S., 

University of Chicago, 1964. 
MCCARTHY, Vincent C, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Toronto, 1953; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1961; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1967. 
McCRUMB, Fred R., Jr., Professor and Director, Division of Virus Diseases; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 
MEINERT, Curtis L., Associate Professor; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1956; 

M.S., University of Minnesota, 1959; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1964. 
MIDDLEBROOK, Gardner, Professor and Director, Division of Virus Diseases; 

A.B., Harvard University, 1938; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1944. 
ROBERTSON, Richard G., Research Associate; B.S., Brigham Young University, 

1959; M.S., Brigham Young University, 1962. 
STAUFFER, John C, Associate Professor, A.B., Princeton University, 1949; M.D., 

Harvard University, 1953. 
TOMINAGA, Suketami, Research Associate, B.S., Osaka University, 1962; M.D., 

Osaka University, 1967. 
WOLFE, Martin S., Assistant Professor; B.A., Cornell University, 1957; M.D., 

Cornell University, 1961; D.C.M.T., London School of Hygiene and Tropical 

Medicine, 1967. 
WOODBURY, John W., Associate Professor and Director, Pakistan Medical Re- 
search Center; B.A., Brown University, 1944; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 

1945. 

Medicine 

WOODWARD, Theodore E., Professor of Medicine and Head of the Department; 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938; 

D.Sc, (Hon.), Western Maryland College, 1950; D.Sc, (Hon.), Franklin and 

Marshall College, 1954. 
ACTON, Conrad B., Associate in Medicine; B.S., Haverford College, 1925; M.D., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1929. 
AGAPITOS, George N., Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Athens 

(Greece), 1948. 
ALEVIZATOS, Aristides C, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Washington and Lee 

University, 1956; M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 
ANDERSON, Andres W., Assistant; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1921, M.D., 

1929. 
ANDRES, Reubin, Associate Professof of Medicine; M.D., Southwestern Medical 

College, 1944. 
ANDREWS, Leon P., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., University of North 

Carolina, 1942; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1945. 
ANTLITZ, Albert M., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Georgetown University, 1951; 

M.D., 1955. 
ASHMAN, Leon, Associate in Medicine; B.S., College of the City of New York, 

1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 



50 • School of Medicine 

ATKINS, John L., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Mount St. Mary's College, 

1932; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1936. 
BACHARACH, David, Instructor in Dermatology and Syphilology; B.A., St. John's 

College, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
BARTH, Werner F., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of 

Arthritis; B.A., Columbia College, 1956; M.D., Albert Einstein College of 

Medicine, 1960. 
BEACHAM, Edmund George, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University 

of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1940. 
BERESTON, Eugene S., Associate Professor of Dermatology; B.A., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1933; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1945; D.Sc., 1955. 
BIANCO, Emidio A., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1950; M.D., 

Georgetown University, 1954. 
BLAZEK, Charles J., Associate in Medicine; A.B., Columbia University, 1942; 

M.D., 1945. 
BLIDE, Richard M., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., University of Rochester, 

1951; M.D., Albany Medical College, 1955. 
BLUM, Louis V., Associate in Medicine; B.A., University of Delaware, 1930; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1934. 
BORGES, Francis J., Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief of Medicine, 

Montebello State Hospital; B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.D., 1950. 
BRAGER, Stuart H., Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; 

M.D., 1958. 
BUNDICK, William R., Associate in Dermatology; M.D., University of Maryland, 

1941. 
BURGIN, Bernard, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1936; 

M.D., 1939. 
BURKLE, Joseph H., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1940; M.D., 1943. 
BURNETT, Joseph W., Assistant Professor of Medicine, A.B., Yale University, 

1954; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1958. 
BYERLY, M. Paul, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
CADER, Gordon, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1948. 
CAROZZA, Frank A., Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., Lehigh University, 

1958; M.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 
CARROL, Douglas G., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Yale University, 

1937; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1942. 
CHARACHE, Patricia, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., Hunter College, 

1952; M.D., New York University School of Medicine, 1957. 
CHURCH, Gerard, Instructor in Medicine; Ch.B., University of Glasgow, 1951; 

F.R.F.P.S.(G), 1956. 
COHEN, B. Stanley, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 
COHEN, Jonas H., Associate in Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; 

M.D., 1940. 
CONNOR, Thomas B., Professor of Medicine, Head of the Division of Endocri- 
nology and Metabolism, and Director of the Clinical Study Center; B.A., Loyola 

College, 1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 
COOK, Elmer Ellsworth, Jr., Assistant in Medicine; B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D., 1943. 
COTTER, Edward F., Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate in Neurology; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 
CROSS, Ernest, Jr., Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1937; 

M.D., 1941. 
DAVIS, John R., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., West Virginia University, 1938; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 



University of Maryland • 51 

DAVIS, Marvin H., Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1940; 

M.D., 1943. 
DEMBO, Donald H., Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1951; M.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 
DIAZ, Alberto, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Santo Domingo, 

Dominican Republic, 1956. 
DUDLEY, Winston C, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Oberlin College, 1943; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1951. 
DUVALL, Robert G., Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 
EASTLAND, J. Sheldon, Associate Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1921; M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
EBELING, William Carl, III, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Head, Division 

of Gastroenterology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1944. 
ELLINGER, George F., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of 

Minnesota, 1931; M.D., 1935. 
ELLIS, Frances A., Professor of Clinical Dermatology; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1921; M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 
ENTWISLE, George, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Massa- 
chusetts, 1944; M.D., Boston University, 1948. 
ESMOND, William C, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1940; 

M.D., 1951. 
EVANS, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., George Washington 

University, 1948; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1952. 
FELDMAN, Maurice, Jr., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 

1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 
FERNANDEZ, Anacleto C, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Institute of Havana, 

Cuba, 1929; M.D., 1940. 
FIOCCO, Vincent, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Columbia University, 1954; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1957. 
FISET, Lorraine G., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 

1948; Ph.D., University of Cambridge (England), 1956. 
FLYNN, Philip D., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Georgetown University, 1929; 

M.D., 1933. 
FREEMAN, Irving, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1932; M.D., 1935. 
FRIEDMAN, Marion, Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; 

M.D., 1942. 
FUNK, Audrey, Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Goucher College, 1940. 
FURNARY, Joseph C, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1938; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
GAKENHEIMER, William A., Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1947. 
GOLDSTEIN, Marvin, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 
GONZALEZ, Caridad E., Assistant in Medicine; B.S., Havana Cuba College, 

1940; A.B., 1944; M.D., University of Havana School of Medicine, 1944. 
GONZALEZ, Luis E., Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 
GREISMAN, Sheldon E., Associate Professor of Medicine; M.D., New York 

University, 1949. 
GRENZER, William H., Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1931; M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 
GUNDRY, Lewis P., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1924; M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 
GUYTHER, Joseph Roy, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of 

Maryland, 1941; M.D., 1943. 



52 • School of Medicine 

HAIDER, Riaz, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.B., B.S., K. E. Medical College 

Lahore; M.R.C.P.(E), 1963; M.D., Thesis accepted, 1966. 
HANK1N, Samuel Jay, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland 

1928. 
HARMON, Louis E., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Lincoln University, 

1928; M.D., Howard University, 1934. 
HAWKINS, Jean E., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Georgia State College 

for Women, 1951; M.A., Duke University, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 
HELFRICH, William G., Associate in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1931; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1935. 
HERSPERGER, W. Grafton, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1929; M.D., 1933. 
HETHERINGTON, Leon H., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., Washington 

and Jefferson College, 1923; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1930. 
HOLLANDER, Mark B., Assistant Professor of Dermatology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
HOLLJES, Henry W. D., Associate in Medicine; A.B., Western Maryland College, 

1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 
HOOPER, Z. Vance, Associate in Gastroenterology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1920. 
HORNICK, Richard B., Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of 

Infectious Diseases; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., 1955. 
INAYATULLAH, Mohammad, Instructor in Medicine; M.B., B.S., King Edward 

Medical College, Lahore, 1956. 
JACOBSON, Meyer W., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1928; M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 
JIJI, Rouben, Assistant Professor in Medicine; M.D., Royal College of Medicine, 

Baghdad, Iraq, 1950. 
KALLINS, Edward S., Instructor in Medicine; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930; 

B.S., 1932; M.D., 1934. 
KAMMER, William H., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1939. 
KARFGIN, Arthur, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Washington College, 1929; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1932. 
KARFGIN, Walter E., Associate in Medicine; B.S., Washington College, 1932; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 
KARNS, James R., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1939; M.D., 1940. 
KASIK, Frank Thomas, Jr., Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1940; M.D., 1950. 
KASSEL, Leon E., Assistant in Medicine; M.D., University of Virginia, 1949. 
KEMICK, Irvin B., Instructor in Medicine; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1933; 

B.S., 1935; M.D., 1937. 
KEOWN, Lauriston L., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., St. John's College, 1929; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 
KERR, H. David, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Maryville College, 1951; 

M.D., Temple University, 1956. 
KING, Joseph D. B., Instructor in Medicine; A. B., Princeton University, 1941; 

M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1944. 
KIRKPATRICK, Crawford N., Jr., Instructor in Pediatrics; A. B., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1940; M.D., Columbia University, 1943. 
KNOCH, H. Roebling, Associate in Medicine; M.D., Temple University, 1941. 
KOCHMAN, Leon A., Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 
KRAUSE, Louis A. M., Professor of Clinical Medicine, Emeritus; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1917. 



University of Maryland • 53 

KREVANS, Julius R., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., New York Univer- 
sity, 1944; M.D., 1946. 
KUEHN, Frank G., Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 
LANCASTER, Robert G., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Gonzaga University, 1952; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 
LEACH, C. Edward, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., Duke University, 1935. 
LEE, Yu-Chen, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Taikoku Imperial University, 

1945; M.D., National Taiwan University, Formosa, 1949. 
LEGUM, Samuel E., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1928; M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 
LERMAN, Lee R., Assistant in Dermatology; B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 

1930; M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1935. 
LERNER, Philip Franklin, Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
LESLIE, Franklin E., Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 
LEVIN, Manuel, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1930; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 
LEVY, David A., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of Maryland, 

1952; M.D., 1954. 
LEVY, Kurt, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Cologne, 1923. 
LEWANDOWSKI, Anthony A., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1951; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 
LIBONATI, Joseph P., Instructor in Medicine; M.S., Duquesne University, 1965; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1968. 
LINTHICUM, C. Milton, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1943; M.D., 1945. 
LISANSKY, Ephraim T., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
LISTER, Leonard, Instructor in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 
LIU, Sze-Jui, Associate in Medicine; M.D., National Central University Medical 

College, China, 1947. 
LOPEZ-MAJANO, Vincent, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Madrid 

Medical School, Spain, 1945; Ph.D., 1950. 
LOVE, William Samuel, Professor of Clinical Medicine, Emeritus. 
LOVICE, Harris, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Heidelberg College (Ohio), 1951; 

M.D., Upstate Medical Center, New York, 1955. 
LUBASH, Glenn D., Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Hyper- 
tension and Renal Diseases; B.A., Columbia College, 1950; M.D., State University 

of New York College of Medicine, N.Y.C., 1954. 
LYDEN, Robert J., Assistant in Medicine; M.D., St. Louis University, 1952. 
MARINE, David N., Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., Johns Hopkins Uni 

versity, 1947. 
MARTIN, Luis G., Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., Madrid Medical School 

1954. 
MASTERS, Jason M., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., High Point College 

1951; M.A., Sul Ross State College, 1956. 
McCRUMB, Fred R., Jr., Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland 

1948. 
McLEAN, George, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Mary 

land, 1916. 
MEAD, Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Loyola College, 1954; M.D. 

University of Maryland, 1958. 
MERRILL, George G., Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., Princeton Univer 

sity, 1932; M.D., Harvard University, 1937. 
MILLER, Stanley, Associate in Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1939 

M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1943. 



54 • School of Medicine 

MINTZER, Donald W., Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
M.D., 1944. 

MORRISON, Samuel, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Professor of 
Gastroenterology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1925; M.D., 1929. 

MORRISON, Theodore H., Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology; M.D., College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, 1915. 

MULLER, S. Edwin, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1937. 

MUSE, Joseph E., Jr., Associate in Medicine; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 1933; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 

MYERS, John A., Instructor in Medicine; B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; 
M.E.E., 1933; M.D., 1938. 

MYERS, Joseph C, Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Western Maryland College, 1939; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

NEISH, Donald D., Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Grove City College, 
1954; M.D., Temple University, 1958. 

NOLAN, James J., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Loyola College, 1937; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1941. 

OMANSKY, Samuel I., Assistant in Medicine; B.A., Duke University, 1952; M.D., 
1957. 

OURSLER, David A., Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 

OWENS, L. Kemper, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 
1948; M.D., University of Chicago, 1960. 

PAPADOPOULOS, Chris, Instructor in Medicine; M.B.B.Ch., University of Alex- 
andria (Egypt), 1956. 

PARKER, Robert T., Associate Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1941; M.D., 1944. 

PIJANOWSKI, Walter J., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1937; M.D., University of Maryland, 1939. 

POLACHEK, Abraham A., Associate in Medicine; B.S., City College of New York, 
1935; M.D., University of Texas, 1942. 

QUEEN, J. Emmett, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Loyola College, 1939; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

QUINN, M. Kevin, Assistant in Medicine; M.B., University College, Dublin, Ire- 
land, 1945. 

RAHMAN, Abdul N., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1952; M.D., 1956. 

RAMAPURAM, George M., Instructor in Medicine; M.B., B.S., University of 
Madras, 1950. 

RAPOPORT, Morton I., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Franklin and 
Marshall College, 1956; M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

RASKIN, Howard F., Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of 
Gastroenterology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1945; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1949. 

RASKIN, Joan, Associate Professor of Medicine in Dermatology; B.A., Goucher 
College, 1951; M.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

REED, Julian, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland; M.D., 1952. 

REITER, Robert A., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1928; M.D., 1932. 

REMSBERG, John R. S., Associate in Medicine; B.A., B.S., University of Minne- 
sota, 1952; M.D., 1955. 

REVELL, Samuel T. R. Jr., Professor of Medicine and Head, Medical Outpatiem 
Department; B.S., University of Georgia, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland 
1937. 






University of Maryland • 55 

ROBINSON, Harry M., Jr., Professor of Dermatology and Head, Division of 
Dermatology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1935. 

ROBINSON, Raymond C. Vail, Associate Professor of Dermatology and Assistant 
Chief of Dermatology Clinic; B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1940; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1950. 

ROIG, Ramon, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1959. 

ROOP, Donald J., Assistant in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1936; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1940; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1950. 

ROTHFELD, Benjamin, Assistant in Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1941; M.S., 1942; M.D., Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 1945. 

RUBIN, Seymour, Assistant in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1946; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

RUSCHE, Edward, Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of Leyden 
(The Netherlands), 1954. 

SALAN, Jerry, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., St. John's College, 1954; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

SAMELSON, Leo, Associate in Medicine; Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1948; M.D., 
Harvard Medical School, 1952. 

SAUNDERS, Elijah, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Morgan State College, 1956; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

SCHERLIS, Leonard, Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of Cardiology; 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1942; M.D., 1945. 

SCHERLIS, Sidney, Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 

SCHUBART, Adalbert F., Associate Professor of Medicine; M.D. University of 
Heidelberg, 1947. 

SCHUSTER, Marvin M., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., University of Chicago, 1950, 
B.S., 1951; M.D., 1955. 

SCOTT, Harry B., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., University of Virginia, 1943; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1947. 

SEGALL, Samuel, Assistant in Medicine; M.D., University of Jena, Germany, 1929. 

SERPICK, Arthur, Associate in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; 
M.D., 1959. 

SERRA, Lawrence M., Assistant Professor of Medicine; Ph.G., University of Mary- 
land, 1925; M.D., 1929. 

SHAPIRO, Albert, Associate Professor of Dermatology; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1934; M.D., 1937. 

SHAW, Charles E., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1942; M.D., 1944. 

SHEA, William H., Assistant in Dermatology; B.S., Loyola College, 1947; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1951. 

SHEAR, Joseph, Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 
1947. 

SHERMAN, Jerome, Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Western Ontario, 
1941. 

SHERRARD, Margaret L., Assistant in Medicine; B.A., Seton Hill College, 1945, 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 

SHERRER, Edward L., Jr., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Bowling Green State Uni- 
versity (Ohio), 1952; M.Sc, Ohio State University, 1953; M.D., 1958. 

SHERRILL, Elizabeth Brown, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1938; M.D., 1941. 

SHOCKETT, Bernard R., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1938; M.D., 1941. 

SILVER, Abraham A., Assistant in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 



56 • School of Medicine 

SILVERSTEIN, Emanuel H., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1957; M.D., 1960. 

SIMPSON, David G., Associate Professor of Medicine; M.B., B.Ch., Queen's Uni- 
versity (Belfast); M.D., 1950. 

SINA, Bahram, Instructor in Medicine; University of Tehran, 1948; University of 
Paris (France), 1952. 

SINGLETON, Robert T., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1951; M.D., 1953. 

SMITH, Solomon, Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 

SMITH, Vernon M., Professor of Medicine; M.D., Temple University, 1949. 

SMOOT, Roland T., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., Howard University, 1948; 
M.D., 1952. 

SNYDER, John N., Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

SNYDER, Merrill J., Associate Professor of Medicine in Clinical Microbiology; 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D., 
1953. 

SOLOMON, Neil, Associate Professor of Medicine; A.B., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1954; M.D., Western Reserve University, 1961; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1965. 

SPEED, William C, III, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Trinity College, 1940; M.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

SPICER, William S., Jr., Associate Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of 
Kansas, 1949. 

SPURLING, Carroll L., Associate Professor of Medicine and Acting Head, Di- 
vision of Clinical Pathology; M.D., Bowman-Gray School of Medicine, 1947. 

STAUFFER, John C, Instructor in Medicine; A.B., Princeton University, 1949; 
M.D., Harvard University, 1953. 

STEINBACH, Stanley Ray, Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1942; M.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 

STEWART, William L., Associate Professor of Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1947; M.D., 1951. 

STRAHAN, John E., Associate in Medicine; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 

SUNDAY, Stuart D., Instructor in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 

SWISHER, Kyle Y., Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 

TIGERTT, William D., Professor of Experimental Medicine; M.D., Baylor Uni- 
versity, 1937; A.B., 1938. 

TOGO, Yasushi, Associate Professor of Medicine; B.S., Tokyo Kotogakke (Japan), 
1941; M.D., University of Tokyo, 1945. 

TOWNSHEND Wilfred H., Jr., Associate in Medicine; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 1940. 

TUDINO, M. Eugene, Instructor in Dermatology; B.S., Providence College, 1953; 
M.D., University of Bologna, 1960. 

TWINING, Ralph H., Associate in Medicine; B.A., Dartmouth College, 1942; M.A., 

1944; M.D., New York University College of Medicine, 1948. 
VAN LILL, Stephen J., Associate in Medicine; B.A., Duke University, 1938; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1943. 
VOLLMER, Frederick J., Instructor in Medicine; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College ; 

1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 
WAGHELSTEIN, Julius, Instructor in Medicine; B.S., University of Maryland; 

M.D., 1935. 
WALL, Lester A., Jr., Associate in Medicine; B.A., St. John's College, 1937; Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1941. 



University of Maryland • 57 

WEBER, Ralph, Associate in Medicine; B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1949; 

M.D., Temple University, 1954. 
WILFSON, Daniel, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1937; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
WILLIAMS, Charles Herman, Associate in Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland 

College, 1937; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
WISSEMAN, Charles L., Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.A., Southern 

Methodist University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State College, 1943; M.D., Southwestern 

Medical School, 1946. 
WISWELL, John G., Professor of Medicine; B.A., Dalhousie University, 1938; B.S., 

1940; M.O.C.M., 1943. 
WOODWARD, Celeste L., Assistant in Medicine; B.A., University Aix-Marseilles 

(France), 1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 
WORKMAN, Joseph B., Associate Professor of Medicine; B.A., Western Maryland 

College, 1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 
WORSLEY, Thomas L., Jr., Assistant in Medicine; B.S., University of North 

Carolina, 1937; M.D., University of Maryland, 1939. 
YAFFE, Stanley N., Assistant Professor of Medicine; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1941; M.D., 1944. 
ZIEVE, Philip D., Assistant Professor of Medicine; A.B., Franklin and Marshall 

College, 1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Fellows 

BIGGS, Richard D., Fellow in Medicine in Cardiology 
COHEN, Miriam L., Fellow in Medicine in Cardiology 
DEAR, William A., Fellow in Medicine in Radioisotopes 
LEVIN, Michael L., Fellow in Medicine in Infectious Diseases 
MUSIC, Stanley I., Fellow in Medicine in Infectious Diseases 
SABUNDAYO, Rolendo M., Fellow in Medicine in Infectious Diseases 
STEPHENSON, Richard R., Fellow in Medicine in Dermatology 
WENZEL, Richard P., Fellow in Medicine in Infectious Diseases 



Microbiology 



WISSEMAN, Charles Louis, Jr., Professor and Head of the Department; B.A., 

Southern Methodist University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State College, 1943; M.D., 

Southwestern Medical School, 1946. 
EYLAR, Ollie Roddy, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; 

M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 
FABRIKANT, Irene B., Instructor; B.Sc, McGill University, 1954; M.Sc, McGill 

University, 1956; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1966. 
FISET, Paul, Associate Professor; B.A., Laval University, Quebec, Canada, 1944; 

M.D., Laval University Medical School, 1949; Ph.D., University of Cambridge, 

England, 1956. 
HACHTEL, Frank W., M.D., Professor of Bacteriology, Emeritus. 
KESSELL, Rosslyn W. I., Associate Professor; M.B.B.S., University College Hos- 
pital Medical School, London, England, 1955; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1960. 
McCRUMB, Fred R., Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 
MYERS, William Frederic, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Kansas, 1949; 

M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1958. 
ROSENZWEIG, Edward Charles, Assistant Professor; A.B., Centre College, 1951; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 
SNYDER, Merrill J., Associate Professor; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D., 1953. 
TRAUB, Robert, Research Professor; B.S., College of the City of New York, 1938; 

M.S., Cornell University, 1939; Ph.D., 1947. 



58 • School of Medicine 

WITTLER, Ruth Graeser, Adjunct Instructor; M.S., Johns Hopkins University, 
1944; Ph.D., Western Reserve University, 1947. 

Pre-Doctoral Fellows 

ANDRESE, Angelo P., M.S. Research Associate 

OSTERMAN, Joseph V., Jr., B.A. ROBERTSON, Richard G., M.S. 

SHIRAI, Akira, M.S. 

SILBERMAN, Ronald, M.S. Assistants 

WALSH, William T., M.S. BRYAN, Velma (PT), A.B. 

WARFEL, Larry E., B.S. STARCKE, Helle 

WELLS, Ruth 
Special Fellow 
OLLODART, Robert M., M.D. 

Neurology 

NELSON, Erland, Professor of Neurology and Head of the Department of 
Neurology; A.B., Carthage College, 1947; M.D., Columbia University College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, 1951; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1961. 

VAN BUSKIRK, Charles, Professor of Neurology; A.B., Westminster College, 
1939; M.S., (Microanatomy), St. Louis University, 1941; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota, 1943; M.D., Albany Medical College, 1947; M.S. (Neurology), Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1953. 

HECK, Albert F., Associate Professor of Neurology; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 

HULFISH, Barbara, Instructor in Neurology; A.B., American University, 1944; 
M.D., University of Rochester, 1952. 

KRAMER, Morton D., Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., University of 
Maryland School of Pharmacy; M.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

MAYER, Richard F., Professor of Neurology; B.S., St. Bonaventure College, 1950; 
M.D., University of Buffalo School of Medicine, 1954. 

MERLIS, Jerome K., Professor of Neurology and Professor of Clinical Neuro- 
physiology; B.S., University of Louisville, 1933; M.D., 1937; M.S., 1938. 

MOSSER, Robert S., Assistant Professor in Pediatrics and Assistant Professor of 
Neurology; B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.D., 1951. 

OLEYNICK, Anatol H., Assistant Professor of Neurology; A.B., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1952; M.D., University of Chicago School of Medicine, 1956. 

PRICE, Thomas R., Assistant Professor of Neurology; B.A., University of Virginia, 
1956; M.D., University of Virginia School of Medicine, 1960. 

SUTTON, Granger G., Assistant Professor of Neurology; B.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 

TEITELBAUM, Harry Allen, Associate Professor of Neurology; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1929; M.D., 1935; Ph.D., 1936. 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 



HASKINS, Arthur L., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Head of the 

Department; B.A., University of Rochester, 1938; M.D., 1943. 
ANCES, Isadore G., Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; 

M.D., 1959. 
BACA, Manuel, Instructor; B.S., Centro Universitari Mexico, 1948; M.D., National 

University of Mexico, 1955. 
BAKER, J. Tyler, Associate; B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1930; M.D., 

Temple University, 1936. 



University of Maryland • 59 

BALLARD, Margaret B., Associate Emeritus; M.D., University of Maryland, 1926. 

BARNETT, Robert M., Assistant; B.S., College of Charleston, 1951; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1959. 

BECK, Harry McBrine, Assistant; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1939. 

CHRISTENSEN, Osborne D., Associate; M.D., George Washington University, 
1935. 

COHEN, Harry, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; 
M.D., 1943. 

COPLAN, Rorert S., Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1948; M.D., 
Harvard Medical School, 1953. 

CORNBROOKS, Ernest I., Jr., Associate Clinical Professor; B.A., St. John's Col- 
lege, 1931; M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

DAVIS, George Howey, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., Washington College, 
1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 

DIENER, Ronald L., Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.D., 1958. 

DIGGS, Everett S., Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1934; M.D., 1937. 

DIXON, D. McClelland, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1932; M.D., 1936. 

DODD, William A., Associate; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

DUMLER, John C, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1928; M.D., 1932. 

DURKAN, James Paul, Assistant Professor; A.B., Loyola College, 1955; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1959. 

EHRLICH, Daniel, Associate; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1939; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1943. 

FITZPATRICK, Vincent DePaul, Jr. Assistant; B.A., Loyola College, 1942; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1945. 

GALLAHER, James Patrick, Assistant; A.B., West Virginia University, 1947; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

GARCIA, Rafael, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Zaragoza, Spain, 1952. 

GAREIS, Louis C, Associate; B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1938. 

HALL, William Martin, Assistant; A.B., Lincoln University; M.D., Meharry 
Medical College, 1953. 

HILL, Claude D., Assistant; B.S., Morgan State College, 1947; M.D., Meharry 
Medical College, 1952. 

JAMES, Walter E., Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.D., 1955. 

KALTREIDER, D. Frank, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 

KARDASH, Theodore, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1938; M.D., 1942. 

LEVIN, Norman, Associate; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 

MAREK, Charles B., Associate; B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1946. 

MARTIN, Clarence W., Assistant Clinical Professor; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1940. 

MAXWELL, George A., Associate; B.A., University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1944. 

McNALLY, Hugh B., Associate Clinical Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 
1930; M.D., 1934. 

MIDDLETON, Edmund B., Associate Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1949. 

MISENHIMER, Harold R., Assistant Professor; M.D., George Washington Uni- 
versity, 1956. 

MOSZKOWSKI, Erica F„ Assistant Professor; B.S., Liceo Nacional De Senoritas 
N 1, 1946; M.D., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1954. 



60 • School of Medicine 

MOULD, L. Louis, Clinical Instructor; M.C., M.D., Queen's University Ontario 

1952. 
MUNFORD, Richard Savage, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Rochester, 

1951; M.D., Yale University, 1951. 
NASDOR, Herbert H., Assistant; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 
PANAYIS, Artemis P., Instructor; M.D., University of Athens, Greece, 1958. 
RANDALL, Louis Leroy, Assistant; B.S., Morgan State College, 1953; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1957. 
REESE, John Morris, Clinical Professor Emeritus; M.D., University of Maryland, 

1920. 
RIMER, Bobby A., Assistant Professor; B.A., University of North Carolina, 1953; 

M.D., 1957. 
SEEGAR, J. King B. E., Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor; B.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1933; M.D., tlniversity of Maryland, 1937. 
SHELL, James H., Jr., Assistant; B.S., Furman University, 1942; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1945. 
SIEGEL, Isadore A., Clinical Professor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1919; 

M.D., 1923. 
SMITH, Stedman W., Associate; B.A., Brown University, 1936; M.D., McGill 

University, 1940. 
VALDERAS, Jose G., Assistant; B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1946; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1947. 
VILLA SANTA, Umberto, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Padua, Italy, 

1950. 
WELLS, George E., Jr., Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1947; M.D., 

1951. 
WOMACK, Wiliam S., Assistant; B.S., Lynchburg College, 1946; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1948. 

Ophthalmology 

RICHARDS, Richard D., Professor and Head of the Department; A.B., University 
of Michigan, 1948; M.D., 1951; M.Sc, State University of Iowa, 1957. 

BERNSTEIN, Howard N., Assistant Professor; B.A., Bucknell University, 1953; 
M.D., State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, 1957. 

BOAZ, Thenton D., Clinical Assistant Professor; M.D., George Washington Uni- 
versity, 1929. 

BRAVER, David A., Instructor; B.S., Ohio State University, 1957; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1963. 

CAVONIUS, Carl R., Research Associate Professor; B.A., Wesleyan University, 
1953; M.S., Brown University, 1961; Ph.D., 1962. 

CREAMER, John J., Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., New 
York Medical College, 1960. 

FEINBERG, Gilbert N., Instructor; Johns Hopkins University, 1955; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1959. 

FOX, Samuel L., Associate Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 
1938. 

GOLDBERG, Julian R., Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1955. 

KATZEN, Leeds E., Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1964. 

KOGAN, Leonard L., Instructor; A.B., Dartmouth College, 1953; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1957. 

KOHLHEPP, Paul A., Instructor; B.S., Loyola College, 1958; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1962. 



University of Maryland • 61 

KRONTHAL, Alfred, Instructor; B.S., Loyola College, 1957; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1961. 
MEISELS, Alfred A., Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Vienna, 1958. 
MICHAEL1S, Moritz, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Wiirzburg, 1934. 
O'ROURK, Thomas R., Jr., Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1962. 
ORTEL, Rodney L., Instructor; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1957; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1961. 
ROSS, Jerome, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1960. 
RUBACKY, Eugene P., Research Assistant Professor; B.S., Fordham University, 

1949; M.S., Georgetown University, 1954; Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1958. 
SCHOCKET, Stanley S., Associate Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1955; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 
HILZ, Rudolf L., Research Associate; Ph.D., University of Munich, 1966. 

Pathology 

SCHULTZ, Robert B., Professor of Pathology and Acting Head of the Department; 

A.B., Whitman College, 1946; M.A., Stanford University, 1948; M.D., Yale 

University, 1952. 
ADAMS, John E., Clinical Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1954; M.D., 1956. 
BURKART, Thomas J., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S., Loyola 

College, 1949; M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 
CRANLEY, Robert E., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S., University 

of Maryland, 1956; M.D., 1958. 
FERRARI, Bohen M., Clinical Instructor of Pathology; B.S., University of Arkansas, 

1952; M.D., 1959. 
FIRMINGER, Harlan I., Professor of Pathology; A.B., Washington University, 

1939; M.D., 1943. 
FISHER, Russell S., Clinical Professor of Forensic Pathology and Head, Division 

of Forensic Pathology; B.S., Georgia School of Technology, 1937; M.D., Medical 

College of Virginia, 1942. 
FREIMUTH, Henry C, Clinical Associate Professor of Forensic Pathology; B.S., 

College of the City of New York, 1932; M.S., New York University, 1933; 

Ph.D., 1938. 
GUERIN, Paul F., Clinical Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; A.B., 

Wittenburg College, 1942; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1945. 
HAMELI, Ali Z., Clinical Assistant Professor of Neuropathology; Alborz College, 

Tehran, Iran, 1951; M.D., Tehran University, 1957. 
HENDRICKSON, Genovefa, Assistant Professor of Pathology; University of 

Tubingen, West Germany, 1952; M.D., University of Munster, 1958. 
HICKEN, William J., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.A., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 
HOFFMAN, Walter I., Clinical Instructor of Pathology; B.S., Chicago Roosevelt 

University, 1958; M.D., University of Basel, Switzerland, 1965. 
HOPPS, Howard C, Clinical Professor of Pathology; B.S., The University of 

Oklahoma, 1935; M.D., 1937. 
KIEFER, Lester, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S., University of 

Maryland, 1943; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1953. 
KIME, P. Watson, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathologx; B.Sc, University of 

Wales, 1950; M.B., BCH., Welsh National School of Medicine, 1953. 
LEVIN, Howard, Assistant Professor of Pathology; A.B., Bowdoin College, 1954; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 



62 • School of Medicine 

LINDENBERG, Richard, Clinical Associate Professor of Forensic Pathology; 
M.D., University of Berlin, 1944. 

MERKEL, Walter C, Clinical Professor of Pathology; A.B., Dickinson College, 
1922; M.D., University of Maryland, 1926. 

MING, Pen-Ming L., Assistant Professor of Pathology; M.D., The Medical College 
National Central University, Nanking, China, 1952. 

MING, Si-Chun, Associate Professor of Pathology; M.D., National Central Uni- 
versity College of Medicine, Nanking, China, 1947. 

PARR, Justin, Assistant Professor of Neuropathology; B.S., University of Wis- 
consin, 1954; M.D., 1958. 

PASSEN, Selvin, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1957; M.D., 1960. 

RASMUSSEN, Peter, Associate Professor of Pathology; M.D., Temple University 
School of Medicine, 1952. 

REIMANN, Dexter L., Clinical Associate Professor of Pathology; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1935; M.D., 1939. 

REUBER, Melvin D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology; A.B., University 
of Kansas, 1952; M.D., 1958. 

SCHWEDA, Paul, Clinical Instructor in Forensic Pathology; University of Vienna. 
1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

SPITZ, Werner, Clinical Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; Geneva Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.D., Jerusalem University-Hadassah Medical School, 1953. 

SPRING ATE, Charles S., Clinical Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology; 
B.A., State University of Iowa, 1947; M.D., Washington University, 1951. 

STONE, William S., Professor of Pathology, and Professor of Medicine; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929. 

TOLL, M. Wilson, Clinical Associate Professor of Pathology; M.Sc, McGill Uni- 
versity, 1935; M.D., 1940. 

WAGNER, John A., Professor of Neuropathology and Head, Division of Neuro- 
pathology; B.S., Washington College, 1934; M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 

WEINBERG, Tobias, Clinical Professor of Pathology; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1930; M.D., 1933. 

WILSON, Edward F., Clinical Instructor of Pathology; B.A., Pennsylvania Uni- 
versity, 1959; M.D., Yale University Medical School, 1959. 

WISOTZKEY, Howard, Clinical Instructor in Neuropathology; B.A., Dartmouth 
College, 1956; M.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

WOOD, Colin, Associate Professor of Pathology; M.B., Ch.B., Birmingham Uni- 
versity, 1946; M.D., 1957. 

WRIGHT, Robert B., Clinical Professor of Pathology; B.S., Centre College, 1920; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1924. 

Fellows and Research Assistants and Associates 

BERGMANN, Hans, Research Assistant in Pathology. 

SHIN, Moon L., Fellow in Pathology; M.D., Soo Do Medical College, Seoul, 
Korea, 1962. 

Pediatrics 

CORNBLATH, Marvin, Professor and Head of the Department; M.D, Washington 

University, St. Louis, 1947. 
AULT, Virginia Lee, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; R.N., Union 

Memorial, 1945; M.D., University of Vermont, 1959. 
AYUYAO, Grace P., Instructor; Associate in Arts, University of Santo Tomas, 

1957; M.D., 1962. 
BADIE, Davood, Instructor; M.D., University of Tehran, Iran, 1955. 



University of Maryland • 63 

BALDWIN, Ruth W., Associate Professor and Director of the Clinic for the 
Exceptional Child; B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1943. 

BALTAZAR, Remedios P., Instructor, M.D., University of Santo Tomas, Philippines, 
1962. 

BAUERNSCHUB, George M., Jr., Instructor; B.S., Loyola College, 1950; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

BESSON, Edwin H., Instructor; B.S., Washington College, 1950; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1954. 

BRADLEY, J. Edmund, Emeritus Professor; B.S., Loyola College, 1928; M.D., 
Georgetown University, 1932. 

BRENNER, Arnold, Instructor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

CAPLAN, Lester Harold, Associate; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1940. 

CLEMMENS, Raymond L., Associate Professor and Director of the Central Evalua- 
tion Clinic; B.S., Loyola College, 1947; M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

CORDI, Joseph M., Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1931; M.S., 1933; 
M.D., 1936. 

CROSBY, Robert M. N., Instructor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

DEANE, Garrett E., Instructor; B.S., Westminster College, 1943; M.D., Wash- 
ington University, 1946. 

FINEMAN, Jerome, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1930; M.D., 
1933. 

FINKELSTEIN, Abraham Harry, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1927. 

GLASER, Kurt, Associate Professor; M.D., University of Lausanne, 1939; M.Sc., 
University of Illinois, 1948. 

GLICK, Samuel S., Associate Professor; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1920 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 

GOODMAN, Howard, Associate; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930; B.S., 1931 
M.D., 1934. 

GORTEN, Martin K., Associate Professor; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1943 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 

GOSHORN, Gary, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1955. 

GRANT, John A., Instructor; A.B., Gettysburg, 1953; M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1957. 

GREEN, Regina M., Instructor of Medical Psychology in Pediatrics; B.S., Morgan 
State College, 1964; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1966. 

GREENBERG, Murray G., Instructor of Community Dentistry; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1959; D.D.S., 1965. 

GUTBERLET, Ronald L., Instructor; A.B., Washington and Lee, 1956; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1961. 

HAYLECK, Mary L., Instructor; A.B., Goucher College, 1934; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1938. 

HECKER, W. Alvin, Instructor; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1955. 

HELDRICH, Frederick Joseph, Jr., Assistant Professor; B.A., Gettysburg College, 
1945; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

HEPNER, Ray, Professor of Pediatrics; B.S., University of Chicago, 1941; M.D., 
1944. 

HOLTHAUS, Robert R., Instructor; A.B., University of Maryland, 1961; M.D., 
1965. 

HOWARD, Lenore W., Instructor in Medical Psychology; A.B., University of 
Connecticut, 1957; M.A., University of New Hampshire, 1959. 



64 • School of Medicine 

HOWELL, Clewell, Associate; B.S., Davidson College, 1919; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1924. 
HUDSON, Barbara W., Instructor; A.B., Cornell University, 1949; R.N., Columbia 

Presbyterian School of Nursing, 1952; M.D., College of Physicians and Surgeons, 

1956. , 
IRW.N, Robert C, Clinical Assistant Professor; A.B., Georgetown University, 

1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 
JENSEN, Philip J., Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Pediatric OPD 

Clinic; A.B., University of Virginia, 1947; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 

1952; M.Sc, University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 
KAISER, Theodore H., Assistant Professor; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1949. 
KAPPELMAN, Murray, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics; B.S., University 

of Maryland, 1953; M.D., 1955. 
KENNY, Thomas J., Instructor; A.B., Washington and Lee, 1954; M.A., Peabody 

College, 1959. 
KLEIN, Donald F., Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1949; M.D., Yale 

University, 1954. 
KNICKERBOCKER, Donald E., Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Michigan, 

1963. 
KOPPANYI, Zsolt H. B., Instructor; Bachiller, Colegio Nacional, Argentina, 

1952; M.D., Facultad de Medicina, Argentina, 1959; Doctor en Medicina, 1961. 
LANG, Richard C, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1955; M.D., 1959. 
LASSON, Morris S., Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology in Pediatrics; 

M.S., Ner Israel College, 1960; M.S., Loyola College, 1962; Ph.D., Catholic 

University, 1966. 
LAVENSTEIN, Arnold F., Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1939. 
LAVY, Richard C, Instructor; B.S., Franklin and Marshall, 1956; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1960. 
LENTZ, George A., Jr., Assistant Professor, Assistant Professor of Physical 

Medicine, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 
LONDON, Richard L., Assistant Professor; A.B., University of Cincinnati, 1945; 

M.D., University of Tennessee, 1949. 
LUDDY, Ruth E., Instructor; B.A., Notre Dame of Maryland, 1960; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1964. 
LYON, James A., Jr., Assistant Professor; A.B., Princeton University, 1944; M.D., 

Long Island College of Medicine, 1947. 
MACHEN, John W., Assistant; A.B., Dartmouth College, 1927; M.D., George- 
town University, 1933. 
MAHER, Edward E., Clinical Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Notre Dame, 

1954; M.D., Georgetown University, 1958. 
MAIDEN, Norma C, Assistant Professor; A.B., Hunter College, 1942; M.A., 

Columbia, 1947. 
McGINN, Eleanor B., Instructor in Medical Psychology; A.B., Wheaton College; 

M.Ed., Boston College. 
MILLER, Norman L., Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.D., 1951. 
MOSSER, Robert S., Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; 

M.D., 1951. 
MULLAN, Paul A., Associate; B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1957. 
NAIR, Prasanna, Assistant Professor; M.B.B.S., University of Delhi, 1956. 
NIERMANN, William A., Assistant; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1948. 
NORTON, Clayton, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1949; M.D., 1953. 
O'MANSKY, Boris, Assistant; M.D., Duke University, 1957. 



University of Maryland • 65 

PADOUSIS, Robert P., Instructor of Pedodontics in Pediatrics; B.S., University 

of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 1964. 
PARKER, William S., Assistant; B.S., University of Chattanooga, 1947; M.D., 

University of Tennessee, 1951. 
RANDOL, Charles Lee, Instructor; A.B., Harvard, 1938; M.D., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1943. 
RENNER, Inge, Instructor; M.B.B.S., University of Hong Kong, 1953. 
RIVERA, Antonia M., Instructor; B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1947; M.D., 

State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, 1955. 
ROBINSON, Sherman S., Instructor; B.S., Davis & Elkins College, 1953; M.D., 

Georgetown University, 1957. 
RULEY, Edward Jerome, Instructor; B.S., The Citadel, Charleston, S.C.; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1964. 
SARDANA, Irene, Instructor in Medical Social Work; B.S., Bangalore, India, 

1956; B.S., Ohio State University, 1958; M.S.W., Howard University, 1961. 
SAUNDERS, Oakley H., Instructor; M.D., Meharry Medical College, 1957. 
SCHERLIS, Leonard, Instructor; A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1942; M.D., 

1945. 
SCHERLIS, Sidney, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1934; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 
SCHWARZ, George C, Assistant Professor; M.D., Duke University, 1960. 
SEABOLD, William M., Assistant Professor; A.B., University of Maryland, 1928; 

M.D., 1931. 
SIGMAN, Bernice, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1960; 

M.S., Washington University, 1966. 
SILA, Ulgan I., Assistant Professor; A.B., Amer. Academy for Girls, Turkey; 

M.D., University of Istanbul, Turkey. 
SINTON, William A., Jr., Instructor; B.S., William and Mary, 1952; M.D., 

University of Maryland, 1956. 
SPRAGINS, Melchijah, Assistant Professor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 

1941; M.D., 1944. 
STAMBLER, Alvin A., Associate; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1952. 
STANDIFORD, Willard E., Assistant; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1956; 

M.D., University of Maryland. 1960. 
STINE, Oscar C, Associate Professor; B.A., Oberlin College, 1950; M.D., George 

Washington University, 1954; Dr. P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1960. 
TILDON, J. Tyson, Research Assistant Professor; B.S., Morgan State College, 

1954; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1965. 
TRAMER, Arnold, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1949. 
VANCE, Arnold, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1953. 
VENTLING, Christa D., Assistant Professor of Pediatric Research; Matura, 

Tochterschule, Zurich, Switzerland, 1950; M.Sc, University of Lausanne (Switzer- 
land), 1954; Ph.D., University of Oxford (Great Britain), 1957. 
WALKER, Stuart H., Associate Professor; A.B., Middlebury College, 1942; M.D., 

New York University, 1945. 
WALL, George H., Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1954. 
WAPNIR, Raul A., Assistant Professor of Pediatric Research; Bacheler. National 

College of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1947; Licensee in Chemistry, University of 

Buenos Aires, 1953; Doctor in Chemistry, University of Buenos Aires, School 

of Chemistry, 1954. 
WEAVER, Karl H., Associate Professor; Assistant Dean for Admissions; A.B., 

West Virginia University, 1950; M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 
WEBER, Ralph, Assistant in Pediatrics; B.S., Franklin and Marshall, 1949; M.D., 

Temple University, 1954. 
WEEKS, William Earl. Assistant; B.S., Wake Forest College, 1937; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1940. 



66 • School of Medicine 

WELLS, Gibson Jackson, Associate Professor; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 

1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 
WHITE, Eric L., Assistant; B.S., Howard University, 1949; M.D., 1953. 
WICH, J. Carlton, Instructor; B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., 1943. 
WRIGHT, Charles E., Instructor; A.B., Centre College of Kentucky, 1951; M.D., 

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1955. 
YIM, Robert E., Associate; B.S., University of Nevada, 1950; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1954. 
ZARBIN, Gino L. F., Assistant; M.D., Universita degli Studi-Milano, 1948. 

Physiology 

BLAKE, William Dewey, Professor and Head of the Department; A.B., Dart- 
mouth College, 1940; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1943. 
ADELMAN, William J., Jr., Professor; B.S., Fordham University, 1950; M.S., 

University of Vermont, 1952; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1955. 
BARRACLOUGH, Charles A., Professor; B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1949; M.S., 

Rutgers University, 1952; Ph.D., 1953. 
FAJER, Abram B., Associate Professor; M.D., University of Sao Paulo, 1951. 
GLAsER, Edmund M., Associate Professor; B.E.E., The Cooper Union, 1949; 

M.S.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1954; D.Eng., 1960. 
GOLDMAN, Lawrence, Assistant Professor; B.S., Tufts University, 1958; Ph.D., 

Columbia University, 1964. 
GREISMAN, Sheldon E., Assistant Professor; M.D., New York University, 1949. 
JURF, Amin N„ Assistant Professor; B.A., Western Maryland College, 1959; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland, 1966. 
KARPELES, Leo M., Associate Professor; B.S., University of North Carolina, 

1941; M.D., University of Washington, 1955. 
MERLIS, Jerome K., Associate Professor; B.S., University of Louisville, 1933; 

M.D., 1937; M.S., 1938. 
PINTER, Gabriel G., Associate Professor; M.D., University Medical School, 

Budapest, 1951. 
SHOCK, Nathan W., Professor; B.S., Purdue, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., University 

of Chicago, 1930; D.Sc, (hon.), Purdue, 1954. 
SMITH, Dietrich Conrad, Professor of Physiology Emeritus. 
SOLOMON, Neil, Associate Professor; A.B., Western Reserve University, 1954; 

M.D., Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 1961. 

Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation 

ENTWISTLE, George, Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation and 
Head of the Department; B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1945; M.D., Boston 
University, 1948. 

BALSAM, Frederick J., Associate in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., 
College of the City of New York, 1931; M.D., University of Lausanne, Switzer- 
land, 1938. 

BARRETT, Harle V., Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilita- 
tion; B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1940; M.S., Kansas State College, 1942; 
M.D., University of Kansas, 1946; M.P.H., Harvard University, 1950. 

BROWN, Alvin, Clinical Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilita- 
tion; B.S., Morgan State College, Baltimore, Maryland, 1945; M.A., Columbia 
University, New York City, N.Y., 1947; M.D., Meharry Medical College, Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, 1960. 

COHEN, B. Stanley, Clinical Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Re- 
habilitation; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 



University of Maryland • 67 

DOWLING, Alexander S., Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine; B.A., 
DePauw University, 1925; M.D., Harvard University, 1930. 

DUKE, James, Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; M.D., 
Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1955. 

ELWOOD, Lawrence, Instructor in Rehabilitation; A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan 
College, 1966; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1968. 

FLEISCHER, Clara J., Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
M.S., Pharmacy, University of Prague, Czechoslovakia, 1932; M.D., Medical 
College of Virginia, 1942. 

GEORGE, Praymol, Research Assistant in Preventive Medicine; B.Sc, University 
of Karala, India, 1960; M.B.B.S., 1966; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1967. 

GESSNER, John E., Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
B.S., Loyola College, 1950; M.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

HEBEL, J. Richard, Assistant Professor in Biostatistics; B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute, 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

HELLMAN, Louis P., Associate Professor of Community Health; B.S., College of 
the City of New York, 1933; M.A., Boston University, 1934; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1967. 

HENDERSON, Maureen M., Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
M.B.B.S., Durham University, England, 1949; D.P.H., 1956. 

HENDRY, Marjorie H., Assistant in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., 
University of Minnesota, 1941; M.D., Women's Medical College, 1953. 

KEMP, Katharine V., Instructor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.A., 
College of Notre Dame, 1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

KESSLER, Irving I., Instructor in Preventive Medicine; A.B., New York Univer- 
sity; M.A., Harvard University, 1955; M.D., Stanford University, 1960; M.P.H., 
Columbia University, 1962; Dr.P.H., Harvard University, 1968. 

KULLER, Lewis H., Instructor in Preventive Medicine; B.A., Hamilton College, 
1955; M.D., George Washington University, 1959; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1964; Dr.P.H., 1966. 

LENTZ, George A., Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

MAHONEY, Florence I., Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilita- 
tion; B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1927; M.S., 1930; M.D., Women's Medical 
College, 1937. 

MARKUSH, Robert E., Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine; B.A., Harvard 
University, 1952; M.D., University of Rochester, 1956; M.P.H., University of 
Michigan, 1959. 

MATANOSKI, Genevieve M., Instructor in Preventive Medicine; A.B., Radcliffe 
College, 1951; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1955; M.P.H., 1962; Dr.P.H., 
1964. 

MULES, Janet E., Instructor in Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation; A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1956; M.D., University of Maryland, 1963; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1967. 

NOVAK, Theresa M., Instructor in Preventive Medicine; R.B., Georgetown Uni- 
versity School of Nursing, 1947; B.S.N.E., University of Maryland, 1958. 

PAYTON, Otto D., Instructor in Rehabilitation; B.S. (Physical Therapy), Uni- 
versity of Kansas, 1958; M.S. in Ed., University of Indiana, 1964. 

RAAB, Kurt, Assistant Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
M.D., Medical School of the University of Vienna, Austria, 1955. 

REED, Julian W., Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.D., 1952. 

RICHARDSON, Aubrey D., Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine and Re- 
habilitation; B.S., University of North Carolina, 1944; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1951. 



68 • School of Medicine 

RICHARDSON, Paul F., Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; and 
Head, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1950. 

SCHONFIELD, Jacob, Associate Professor of Psychology in Rehabilitation; B.S., 
Yeshiva University, 1950; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1960. 

SHERRILL, Elizabeth, Instructor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland. 1941. 

SILBER, Maurycy, Clinical Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilita- 
tion; pre-medical, Gymnasium Lwow, Poland, 1932; M.D., University of Genoa. 

SRULEVICH, Salomon, Instructor in Preventive Medicine; B.S., Institute (Italy, 
1938); "Alfredo Vasquez Acevedo," Uruguay, 1945; M.D., University of the 
Republiv of Uruguay, 1955; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, 1958. 

STERN, Marvin, Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation; B.A., Brooklyn College, 
1957; M.S., (Hospital Administration), University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

STEWART, William L., Assistant Professor of Community Medicine; B.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1947; M.D., 1951. 

TAYBACK, Matthew, Professor of Biostatistics; B.A., Harvard College, 1939; 
M.D., Columbia University, 1950; ScD., Johns Hopkins University, 1953. 

Psychiatry 

BRODY, Eugene B., Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Department; Director, 
The Psychiatric Institute; A.B., M.A., University of Missouri, 1941; M.D., Har- 
vard University, 1944. 

AINSWORTH, Leonard H., Associate Clinical Professor in Forensic Psychiatry; 
B.A., University of Toronto, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., University College, Uni- 
versity of London, 1953. 

ALBRIGHT, Mary J., Assistant Professor in Medical Psychology; B.A., St. Mary 
of the Springs College, 1954; M.A., Fordham University, 1956; Ph.D., 1966. 

ANDERSON, A. Russell, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1929; M.D., University of Chicago, 1933. 

ASCHER, Eduard, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Washington 
University, 1942. 

AWAD, Mohamed Z., Research Associate in Neurobiology; B.S., University of 
Alexandria, Egypt, 1950; Ph.D., University of London, 1953. 

BALIS, George, Associate Professor in Psychiatry; M.D., National University ot 
Athens, 1954. 

BARTEMEIER, Leo H., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Catholic University 
of America, 1914; M.A., 1916; M.D., Georgetown Medical School, 1920. 

BAUM, Marcia, Teacher II in Child Psychiatry; B.A., Antioch College, 1945. 

BECKER, Rheda E., Research Associate in Child Psychiatry; B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1956; M.A., 1957. 

BLASS, Thomas, Research Associate in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., 
Yeshiva College, 1963; M.A., Yeshiva University, 1965; Ph.D., 1969. 

BLUMBERG, Donald, Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1951; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania, 1957. 

BLUTH, Howard, Psychiatric Social Worker in Division of Community Psychiatry; 
B.A., University of Cincinatti, 1962; M.S.W., Ohio State University, 1966. 

BOSLOW, Harold, Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; M.D., University of 
Virginia School of Medicine, 1939. 

BOWEN, Claudia, Research Assistant in Psychiatry; B.A., Mary Manse College, 
1968. 

BRADFORD, Norman H., Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1956; Ph.D., 1964. 



University of Maryland • 69 

BROWN, George P., Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., Howard Uni- 
versity, 1940; M.D., 1944. 

BROWN, Robert, Chief Psychologist; B.A., Princeton University, 1947; M.A., 1950. 

BURT, Roger, Psychologist in Division of Community Psychiatry; B.A., University 
of Michigan, 1962; Ph.D., Duke University, 1967. 

CAPPON, Daniel, Professor of Psychiatry, Director, Division of Community Psy- 
chiatry; M.B.B.S., St. Mary's Hospital, University of London, 1944; D.P.M., Uni- 
versity of London, 1948; M.R.C.P., Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh, 
1949; F.R.C.P., 1962. 

CARSON, James E., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Clemson University, 
1947; M.D., Medical College of South Carolina, 1952. 

CHACKO, Rose, Visiting Instructor in Child Psychiatry; M.B.B.S., University of 
Madras, India, 1949; D.Psy, University of Toronto, 1953; C.R.C.P.S., 1955. 

CICCI, Regina L., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Kent State University, 
1960; M.A., Northwestern University, 1961. 

CLEMMENS, Raymond L., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry, Associate 
Professor of Pediatrics; B.S., Loyola College, 1947; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1951 

CLOWER, Courtney G., Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., St. Louis 
University, 1953; M.D., 1957. 

COHEN, George M., Assistant Clinical Professor, Director of Child Care; B.Sc, 
University of Pittsburgh, 1956; M.Sc, University of Pennsylvania Medical 
School, 1963. 

COHN, Jess Victor, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Cincin- 
nati, 1931; M.B., 1933; M.D., 1934. 

CONNOR, Huell E., Jr., Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Texas A. & M University, 
1958; M.A., University of Texas, 1960; M.D., 1964. 

COWEN, Joseph R., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Chicago 
and Johns Hopkins; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

CROCE, Giovanni C, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D., University of Rome, 
1946. 

DAVIS, Nathan M., Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.A., University of Chicago, 
1950; M.D., University of Chicago, 1957. 

DAVIS, Robert E., Psychiatric Social Worker; B.A., St. Vincent College, 1952; 
M.A., 1960; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1968. 

DERBIN, James P., Instructor and Director of In-patient Service in Community 
Psychiatry; M.D., Marquette School of Medicine, 1959. 

DERBYSHIRE, Robert L., Associate Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

DONAHOE, Kay, Psychiatric Social Worker; M.S.W., Catholic University of 
America, 1960. 

DONNER, Lawrence, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; 

B.A., Rutgers, The State University, 1962; M.S., 1965; Ph.D., 1967. 
EICHLER, Myron, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Tulane Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.D., New York Medical College, 1954. 
EINBERG, Elmar, Research Associate in Psychiatry; E. E., Netzlers Institute of 
Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 1950; B.Sc, in England; Degree in Mechanical 
Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 1962. 
FAILLACE, Louis A., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; M.D., Marquette Uni- 
versity School of Medicine, 1957. 
FARINHOLT, L. Whiting, Jr., Professor of Law in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1934; LL.B., University of Maryland, 1940; LL.M., Harvard Law 
School, 1947. 
FASSETT, Deane, Director of Psychiatric Nursing; B.S.N. , University of Maryland, 
1961; M.S., 1966. 



70 • School of Medicine 

FIEDLER, Kurt Rudi, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.A., University of Berlin, 
1949; M.D., 1953. 

FINDLEY, Jack D., Research Associate Professor of Psychology in Department of 
Psychiatry; B.A., Baylor University, 1950; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1954. 

FINN, Rolfe B., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D., Ch.B., University of 
Otago, N.Z., 1950; D.P.M., Conjoint Examing Board of England, 1957. 

FITZPATRICK, William N., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Mercer Uni- 
versity, 1941; M.D., Emory University, 1944. 

FORD, Ross, Psychiatric Social Worker in Division of Community Psychiatry; 
B.A., Lincoln University, 1961; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1967. 

FOSTER, Genevieve W., Assistant Clinical Professor in Child Psychiatry; A.B., 
Vassar College, 1922; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953. 

FREINEK, Wilfreid R., Instructor in Forensic Psychiatry; M.D., Innsbruck, Uni- 
versity of Austria, 1953. 

FRIEDENBERG, Robert, Research Associate Professor of Neurobiology in Psy- 
chiatry; B.A., Park College, 1953; M.S., University of Mississippi, 1956; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut, 1963. 

GAVIN, Grace Arlene, Assistant Professor in Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Akron, 1942; M.S.W., Washington University of St. Louis, George 
Warren School of Social Work, 1952. 

GELPI, Jose A., Fellow in Child Psychiatry; M.D., University of Salamanca, Spain, 
1963; M.S., Ohio State University, 1967. 

GLASER, Kurt, Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; M.S., University of 
Illinois, 1949; M.D., University of Lausanne, 1939. 

GOLDIAMOND, Israel, Research Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1942; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1955. 

GOLDMANN, Harry, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1916. 

GOODMAN, Elizabeth, Teacher, Adolescent Psychiatry Service; B.A., University 
of Maryland, 1952; M.Ed., Towson State College, 1969. 

GORDON, Bernard S., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., University of 
Michigan, 1937; M.D., University of Louisville, 1942. 

GORWITZ, Kurt, Assistant Professor of Biometrics in Psychiatry; B.S.A., City Col- 
lege of New York, 1950; M.S., Columbia University, 1955; M.P.A., Syracuse 
College, 1955. 

GRAY, Sheila Hafter, Assistant Clinical Professor; B.A., Brooklyn College, 1950; 
M.A., New School for Social Research, 1954; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 
1958. 

GRENELL, Robert G., Professor of Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B.S., College of 
the City of New York, 1935; M.S., New York University, 1936; Ph.D., University 
of Minnesota, 1943. 

GRIFFIN, Rosalind, Psychiatric Social Worker in Division of Community Psy- 
chiatry; B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1961; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1966. 

GROSS, Alfred, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology; B.S.S., City College 
of New York, 1949; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., Adelphi University, 1962. 

GROSS, Gertrude M., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D., Basel University, 
1935. 

GROSS, Herbert S., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yeshiva College, 1956; 
M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1960. 

GROSS, Martin, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; M.D., University of 
Hamburg, 1924. 

GUTCHES, George A., Psychiatric Social Worker in Division of Community 
Psychiatry; B.S., Michigan State University, 1959; M.S.W., University of Mary- 
land, 1964. 

HAGE, Mary Jean, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Minnesota, 
1960; M.S.W., Catholic University of America, 1968. 



University of Maryland • 71 

HA1N, Douglas R., Teacher III in Child Psychiatry Service; B.A., Moravian 

College. 
HAMILTON, John, Clinical Instructor in Forensic Psychiatry; B.A., Pacific Union 

College, 1943; M.D., Howard University School of Medicine, 1951. 
HARRIS, William M., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., University of West 

Virginia, 1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 
HARTZ, Jerome, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yale University, 

1933; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1937. 
HICKS, Sally, Psychiatric Social Worker in Division of Community Psychiatry; 

B.A., DePaul University, 1960; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1966. 
HITCHMAN, Irene L., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Maedchen Realgym- 

nasium, 1927; M.D., University of Innsbruck, 1933. 
HOLDEN, William, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., Marquette University, 

1948; M.D., 1952. 
HOLDER, W. Lewis, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., Emory University, 

1949; M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 
HUFFER, Virginia, Associate Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D., 1950. 
HULFISH, Barbara, Clinical Instructor in Neurology in Psychiatry; B.A., American 

University, 1944; University of Rochester, 1952. 
HUNT, Gerald, Assistant Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry; B.S., Fordham 

University, 1959; M.A., Emory University, 1962; Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina, 1969. 
JACOBSON, Wayne, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Willamette 

University, 1945; M.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1949. 
JANTZ, Eleanor, Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., North- 
western University, 1953; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 
JARBOE, Peggy, Rehabilitation Therapist; B.F.A., Maryland Institute of Art, 1965. 
JOHNSTON, Daniel F., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 
KAISER, Theodore H., Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1945; M.D., 1949. 
KLOOR, Morris, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.A., Louisiana State University, 

1958; M.D., 1962. 
KLOSS, Marie G., Fellow in Medical Psychology; in Psychiatry; B.S., Pennsylvania 

State University, 1963; M.A., Louisiana State University, 1967. 
KNIFFIN, Ann Lynn, Psychiatric Social Worker; B.A., University of Akron, 1952; 

M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1968. 
KOHLMEYER, Werner A., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; M.D., University 

of Goettingen, 1942; Pipl. in Psychiatry, McGill University, 1953. 
KOHN, Josephine, Community Cordinator in Division of Community Psychiatry; 

B.A., Goucher College, 1936. 
KRAFT, Gladys, Assistant Professor in Division of Community Psychiatry; A.B., 

Brooklyn College, 1943; M.S.S.A., School of Applied Social Science, University 

of Pittsburgh, 1944. 
KRAMER, Morton, Lecturer in Epidemiology in Psychiatry; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1934; Sc.D., 1939. 
KUBIE, Lawrence S., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., Harvard, 1916; M.D., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 
KURLAND, Albert, Lecturer in Psychiatric Research; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1936; M.D., 1940. 
LAI, Harry, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.E.E., College of The City of New 

York, 1951; M.D., University of Amsterdam, 1961. 
LAMB, Arthur C, Instructor, Division of Community Psychiatry; A.B., Brown 

University, 1959; M.D., University of Maryland, 1963. 



72 • School of Medicine 

LASSON, Morris L., Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.A., Ner Israel College, 

1960; M.A., Loyola College, 1962; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1966. 
LEVIN, Leon A., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University of Wisconsin, 

1952; M.D., 1956. 
LEVY, Robert, Assistant Professor in Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B.S., McGill 

University, 1959; Ph.D., 1965. 
LEWIS, Harvey A., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Manhattan College, 

1952; M.D., Georgetown University, 1956. 
LISANSKY, Ephraim T., Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 
LLOYD, Dee, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.A., University of Utah, 1956; 

M.A., 1958; Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 1961. 
LOGAN, Margaret, Psychiatric Social Worker in Child Psychiatry; B.A., George 

Washington University, 1960; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1968. 
LURIE, Sylvia, Instructor in Psychiatry; B.A., Smith College, 1931; M.S.W., 

Howard University School of Social Work, 1959. 
MACKIE, James B., Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; 

B.A., University of Utah, 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 
MAGRUDER, William W., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Mis- 
sissippi State College, 1942; M.D., Duke University, 1944. 
MARTIN, Homer B., Instructor in Forensic Psychiatry; M.D., Union of Louisville, 

1951. 
MAXWELL, Anabel, Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1933; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania, 1938. 
McCUE, Cecelia, Assistant Professor in Psychiatric Social Work; A.B., West 

Virginia University, 1929; M.A., University of Chicago, 1950. 
McELROY, Evelyn, Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, Division of Community 
Psychiatry; B.S., University of Colorado, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1966. 
McCULLOH, Duncan, Research Electronics Engineer in Psychiatry; A.A., Prince- 
ton University, 1950; B.E.S., E.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1970. 
McNELIS, Desmond P., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.B.B.Ch., University 

College, Dublin, Ireland, 1946. 
McQUEEN, John, Research Consultant in Neurosurgery, Neurobiology Labora- 
tory; M.D., University of Toronto, 1946; M.A., 1950. 
MODARRESSI, Taghi M., Assistant Professor in Child Psychiatry Division; M.D., 

University of Tehran, 1959. 
MONROE, Russell R., Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Yale University, 1942; 

M.D., 1944. 
MOTT, Thurman, Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S. North- 
western University, 1950; M.D., 1952. 
MOURAT, Stephan, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; A.B., West Virginia Uni- 
versity, 1941; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1944. 
NABORS, Frances, Clinical Instructor in Forensic Psychiatry; M.A., Arizona 

State University, 1951; University of Mexico, 1965. 
NAKAZAWA, Mineko, Research Associate in Neurobiology in Psychiatry; B.A., 

Goucher College, 1965. 
NILSSON, Veryl, Psychiatric Social Worker in Community Psychiatry; B.A., 

University of Northern Iowa, 1938; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania, 1950. 
NOSHPITZ, Joseph, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., University 

of Louisville, 1943; M.D., 1945. 
NOVEY, Riva, Lecturer in Psychiatry; A.B., Goucher College, 1935; M.S.S., Smith 
College of Social Work, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine, 
1954. 
O'DONNELL, James J., Clinical Assistant in Community Psychiatry; Instructor in 
Alcoholism. 



University of Maryland • 73 

OLEYNICK, A. Harry, Clinical Instructor in Neurology in Psychiatry; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1952; M.D., University of Chicago School of Medicine, 
1956. 

OPPENHEIMER, Ruth, Clinical Instructor in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; 
B.A., Birkbeck College, University of London, 1953. 

OZER, Mark, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology in Child Psychiatry; A.B., 
Harvard, 1953; M.D., Boston University School of Medicine, 1957. 

PHILLIPS, Frederick E., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.S., Eveleth Junior 
College, 1941; M.D., Wayne University, 1946. 

POPE, Addison, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., Howard University, 1948; 
M.D., Meharry Medical College, 1957. 

POPE, Benjamin, Professor of Medical Psychology; B.S., University of Manitoba, 
1955; B.Ed., 1941; Ph.D., University of California, 1950. 

RAE-GRANT, Naomi, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; M.B., B.S., Uni- 
versity of London, 1952; D.P.M., 1958. 

RAFFERTY, Francis T., Jr., Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Child Psychiatry; 
B.S., St. Mary's College; M.D., St. Louis University, 1948; M.S., University 
of Colorado, 1953. 

RAHER, Jack, Research Associate Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, 1943; M.S., University of Cincinnati, 1948; M.D., University of Geneva, 
Switzerland, 1953. 

RAMSAY, Robin, Rehabilitation Therapist; B.F.A., Maryland Institute of Art, 1955. 

RAPPEPORT, Jonas, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1950; M.D., 1952. 

REED, Julian W., Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1948; M.D., 1952. 

ROBINSON, Kent E., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., University 
of Cincinnati, 1943; M.D., 1947. 

ROMERO, Eduardo. Research Associate in Neurobiology in Psychiatry; A.B., 
Instituto D. F. Sarmiento, 1955; M.D., National University of Cordoba, Argen- 
tina, 1963. 

ROSEMAN, Morris, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; B.A., 1943; Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 

SACK, Lawrence, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., Harvard, 1956; M.D., 
1960. 

SAIDEL, Barbara H., Instructor in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.S., The 
City College of New York, 1955; M.S., 1957; Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1964. 

SAKLES, Constantine J., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., University of 
Rochester, 1955; Yale University School of Medicine, 1959. 

SAVAGE, Charles, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1939; M.S., University of Chicago, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

SCHAMP, Juliana R., Instructor, Psychiatric Social Work in Child Psychiatry, 
A.B., Miami University, 1945; M.A., Ohio State University, 1948. 

SCHLEIFER, Carl B., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., University 
of Florida, 1950; M.D., Emory University, 1955. 

SCHMUFF, Henry, Occupational Therapist; B.F.A., Maryland Institute of Art, 
1963. 

SCHNAPER, Nathan, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.S., Washington 
College, 1940; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 

SCHNEIDER, Miriam, Consultant in Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Hunter Col- 
lege, 1939; M.S.W., Columbia University, 1946; D.S.W., Catholic University of 
America, 1967. 
SCHONFIELD, Jacob, Assistant Clinical Professor in Medical Psychology in Psy- 
chiatry; B.A., Yeshiva University, 1950; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1960. 



74 • School of Medicine 

SCHULZ, Clarence, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; M.D., Washington University, 
1945. 

SCHWEIG, Noel, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1951; M.D., Duke University, 1956. 

SHAFFER, John, Research Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry; B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

SHOCHET, Bernard, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1952; M.D., 1954. 

SIEGMAN, Aron W., Research Associate Professor of Medical Psychology; B.A., 
City College of New York, 1952; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1954; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1957. 

SILA, Basri, Assistant Professor in Division of Community Psychiatry; B.S., Col- 
lege of Saint Michel, Istanbul, Turkey, 1950; M.D., University of Istanbul, 
Turkey, 1956. 

SMITH, James, Clinical Instructor in Forensic Psychiatry; A.B., Union College, 
1944; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1951. 

SPILIADIS, Sotoriors, Psychiatric Social Worker in Community Psychiatry; B.A., 
Columbia University, 1964; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1967. 

STYRT, Jerome, Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.S., University of Chicago, 
1940; M.D., 1945. 

TAYLOR, Terry, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., Duke University, 1956; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1960. 

THISTEL, Carl, Instructor in Social Work and Community Organizer in Division 
of Community Psychiatry; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1960; M.S.W., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1965; A.C.S.W., Academy of Certified Social Workers, 1968. 

TIGNOR, Kathy, Psychiatric Social Worker in Community Psychiatry; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, 1965; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1967. 

TRATTNER, Robert E., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; D.D.S., Western Reserve 
University, 1945; A.B., 1947; M.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

TUERK, Isadore, Associate Clinical Professor in Psychiatry; B.S., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1930; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

ULGUR, Ulku, Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; M.D., University of Istanbul, 
1959. 

VAULS, Kersley, Rehabilitation Therapist; B.S., Morgan State College, 1958. 

VIDAVER, Robert M., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry; A.B., Columbia 
University, 1953; M.D., State University of New York, 1956. 

VON MUEHLEN, Lutz H., Instructor in Psychiatry; Clinical Instructor in Psy- 
chiatry; B.S., University of Frankfurt, 1954; M.D., University of Munich, 1958. 

WARSOFSKY, Marvin, Psychiatric Social Worker in Community Psychiatry; A.B.. 
Northeastern University, 1959; M.S.W., Howard University, 1968. 

WARTHEN, Frances J., Research Assistant Professor in Division of Community 
Psychiatry; B.S., Southern Methodist University, 1959; M.S.N., Catholic Uni- 
versity of America, 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

WEINSTEIN, Stanley, Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work in Child Psychiatry; 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1965; M.S.W., 1968. 

WEINTRAUB, Walter, Associate Professor of Psychiatry; B.A., New York Uni- 
versity, 1948; M.D., University of Geneva, 1951. 

WEIR, Douglas W., Instructor in Psychiatry; A.B., St. John's College, 1958; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1964. 

WEISMAN, Maxwell N., Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry; B.A., College of The 
City of New York, 1930; M.A., Columbia University, 1931; M.D., University 
of Amsterdam, 1958. 

WEISS, Dianne, Instructor in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.S., Alfred Uni- 
versity, 1965; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1967. 

WEISS, Stephan D., Fellow in Medical Psychology in Psychiatry; B.A., University 
of Connecticut, 1965; M.S., University of Massachusetts, 1968. 



University of Maryland • 75 

WHITMARSH, Gerald A., Assistant Professor in Psychiatry; B.A., Trinity College, 

1953; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1961. 
WILHELMSEN, Judy, Assistant Professor in Psychiatric Nursing in Community 

Psychiatry; R.N., University of Maryland School of Nursing, 1956; B.S., 1964; 

M.S., 1968. 
WISE, Samuel P., Research Associate in Psychiatry; A.B., Emory University, 1941; 

M.D., Tulane University, 1946. 
YOUNG, Imogene S., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Social Work; B.A., Sophie 

Newcomb College, 1933; M.S.W., Tulane University, 1935; D.S.W., Catholic 

University of America, 1968. 



Radiology 



DENNIS, John Murray, Professor of Radiology and Head of the Department; 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 
COCKEY, Thomas Beale, Instructor; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1948; M.D., 

Johns Hopkins University, 1952. 
DAVIDSON, Charles Nuckols, Professor of Clinical Radiology; M.D., University 

of Virginia, 1938. 
HEARN, John Berkley, Associate Professor; M.B., B.S., Middlesex Hospital, 

London, 1947; D.M.R.D., 1952; F.F.R., 1956. 
HYMAN, Nathan Bernard, Instructor; M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 
KNOX, Gaylord Shearer, Associate Professor; M.D., Tulane University, 1951. 
LYON, James Alfred, Jr., Associate Professor; A.A., Princeton University, 1944; 

M.D., Long Island College of Medicine, 1947. 
REISS, Mark David, Assistant Professor; A.B., Syracuse University, 1955; M.D., 

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1959. 
ROBINSON, James Eugene, Associate Professor of Radiology and Head, Section 

of Physics and Radiobiology; B.S., Utah State Agricultural College, 1947; M.A., 

Washington University, 1949; Ph.D., 1955. 
ROSS, Winifred Margaret, Instructor; B.S., University of Manitoba, 1942; M.D., 

Albert Einstein School of Medicine, 1961. 
THOMAS, William Nathanil, Instructor, M.D., University of Virginia, 1942. 
WALLOP, William H., Instructor; A.A., Princeton University, 1949; M.D., Co- 
lumbia University, 1949. 
WEINER, Seymour, Instructor; B.S., City College of New York, 1956; M.D., 

Albert Einstein School of Medicine, 1961. 
WIZENBERG, Morris Joseph, Assistant Professor; M.D., University of Toronto, 

1953. 
YOUNG, William Werner, Instructor; B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1958; 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1962. 



Surgery 



BUXTON, Robert William, Professor of Surgery 1 and Head of the Department; 

A.B., Kansas University, 1931; M.D., 1936; M.S., University of Michigan, 1943. 
ABESHOUSE, George A., Instructor in Urology; A.B., Yale University, 1952; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 
ABRAMS, Robert Calvin, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1935; M.D., 1939. 
ADAMS, Thurston R., Associate Professor of Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1934. 
ALDERMAN, George Carl, Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., Loyola College, 

1948: M.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 
ARNOLD, James Givens, Jr., Professor of Neurological Surgery and Head, Division 

of Neurological Surgery 1 : B.A., University of North Carolina. 1925; M.D.. Johns 

Hopkins University, 1929. 



76 • School of Medicine 

ATTAR, Safuh, Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery; B.A., Makassed College, 

1943; M.D., American University, Beirut, Lebanon, 1947. 
AUSTIN, George N., Professor and Head Division of Orthopedic Surgery; B.A., 

University of Oklahoma, 1940; M.D., University of Oklahoma, 1940; M.D., 

University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, 1950. 
BAITCH, Arthur, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1952; M.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 
BELCHER, Henry V., Instructor in Surgery; B.A., University of Virginia, 1948; 

M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1952. 
BERRY, Robert Z., Associate in Otolaryngology; B.A., University of West Virginia, 

1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 
BIEHL, Harold Paul, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Western Maryland College, 1936; 

M.D, University of Maryland, 1940. 
BLANCHARD, Cyrus L., Professor of Otolaryngology and Head, Division of 

Otolaryngology; B.A., Clark University, 1943; M.D., George Washington Uni- 
versity, 1946. 
BOWIE, Harry Clay, Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1932; M.D., 1936. 
BRANTIGAN, Otto Charles, Professor of Surgery; B.S., Northwestern University, 

1931; M.D., 1934. 
BRIELE, Henry Alison, Associate in Postgraduate Surgery; Ph.G., University of 

Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1939. 
BURNS, Harold Bubert, Associate in Surgery; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 

1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 
CAMPBELL, Edward W., Jr., Assistant Professor of Urology; A.B., Amherst 

College, 1954; M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1958. 
CERINO, Michele T., Instructor in Thoracic Surgery; M.D., University of Pisa 

Medical School, 1955; M.S., McGill University, 1963. 
CHAPMAN, Margaret J., Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1952; M.A., Northwestern University, 1961. 
CICCI, Regina L., Instructor in Speech Pathology; B.S., Kent State University, 

1960; M.A., Northwestern University, 1961. 
CLARK, Francis Alden, Jr., Instructor in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 

1961. 
COWLEY, R. Adams, Professor of Thoracic Surgery and Head, Division of 

Thoracic Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 
CROSBY, Robert M. N., Associate in Neurological Surgery; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1943. 
CROSS, Richard J., Associate in Otolaryngology; B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 

1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 
CUNNINGHAM, Raymond M., Instructor in Surgery; B.A., Loyola College, 1935; 

University of Maryland, 1939. 
DEVINCENTIS, Michael L., Instructor in Surgery; B.S., Loyola College, 1937; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 
DIAMOND, Liebe Sokol, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Smith College, 

1951; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1955. 
DUNNIGAN, William Charles, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1931; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 
DWYER, Frank Philip, Jr., Assistant in Otolaryngology; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1948. 
ENGNOTH, Milton L., Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1953; M.D., 1957. 
ESMOND, William C, Assistant Professor in Surgery; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1940; M.D., 1951. 
FLETCHER, Margaret M„ Assistant Professor in Otolaryngology; B.S., University 

of Michigan, 1957; M.D., University of Michigan, 1961. 



University of Maryland • 77 

FLOTTE, C. Thomas, Associate Professor of Surgery; B.S., Franklin and Marshall 
College, 1943; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1946. 

GALLEHER, Earl Potter, Associate Professor of Urology; A.B., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1949; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1953. 

GARL1CK, William Lynnewood, Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery; A.B., 
Emory University, 1933; M.D., George Washington University, 1937. 

GASKEL, Jason H., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1930; M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

GERLACH, James J., Assistant in Otolaryngology; A.B., Colorado College, 1943; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1946. 

GOLDSTEIN, Robert Bruce, Instructor in Urology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1954. 

GOVATOS, George, Assistant Professor of Surgery; A.B., Boston College, 1926; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1930. 

GREENSTEIN, George Herbert, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1941; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

HAINES, John S., Assistant Professor of Urology; A.B., Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity, 1934; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

HAMBERRY, Leonard Gerard, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1940; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

HAMMOND, Arthur F., Jr., Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., Seton Hall Uni- 
versity, 1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

HANASHIRO, Paul K., Assistant Professor of Thoracic Surgery; A.B., Indiana 
University, 1953; M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

HEBB, Donald B., Assistant in Surgery; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

HELFRICH, Raymond F., Associate in Surgery; A.B., Loyola College, 1927; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1931. 

HENDERSON, Charles Morgan, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1955; M.D., 1957. 

HERRMAN, Raymond W., Instructor in Urology; A.B., University of Illinois, 
1941; M.D., St. Louis University, 1946. 

HILGER, Thelma, Instructor in Audiology; B.A., University of Iowa, 1950; M.S., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1952. 

HOLBROOK, William Addison, Assistant in Surgery; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1942; M.D., 1945. 

HUBBARD, T. Brannon, Jr., Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.A., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1938; M.D., Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 
1952. 

HULL, Harry Clay, Professor of Clinical Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1932. 

ISAACS, Benjamin Herbert, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 

JOHNSON, Robert H., Jr., Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.A., Duke University, 
1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 

JONES, Everett D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., Western Maryland 
College, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1927. 

KRAMER, Howard Calvin, Instructor in Urology; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1951. 

LABROSSE, Elwood H., Research Associate Professor; B.S., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1945; M.S., 1948; M.D., 1949; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1956. 

LANGENFELDER, Henry E., Assistant in Surgery; B.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1947; M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1951. 

LAPIDARIO, Renato S., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; A.A., University of 
Philippines, 1956; M.D., University of Philippines, 1961. 

LEBOUVIER, John Douglas, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., London 
University, 1952; M.B., 1952. 



78 • School of Medicine 

LONG, William B., Associate in Postgraduate Surgery; B.S., Princeton University, 
1940; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

LOVE, Jack W., Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.A., University of Illinois, 1952; 
Ph.D., Oxford University, England, 1956; M.D., Yale University, 1958. 

LYNN, William Dawson, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., Princeton University, 1940; 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

MANSBERGER, Arlie R., Jr., Professor of Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1947. 

MAYS, Howard Brooks, Assistant Professor of Urology; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1935. 

McELWAIN, Howard B., Assistant in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1919. 

MCLAUGHLIN, Joseph S., Assistant Professor in Thoracic Surgery; B.S. Loyola 
College, 1954; M.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 

MECH, Karl Frederick, Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1932; M.D., 1935. 

MILLER, John E., Instructor in Surgery; B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1938; 

MILLER, Joseph M., Associate in Surgery; A.B., Columbia University, 1931; M.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1939. 
M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1942. 

MOORE, Kirk, Assistant in Surgery; A.B., Princeton University, 1941; M.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1944. 

MORGAN, Thomas H., Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, M.B., Cam- 
bridge University, 1943; M.D., University College Hospital, Medical School, 
London, 1945. 

MOSBERG, William H., Jr., Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1944. 

NATALE, Ralph D., Instructor in Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 
1955; M.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 

NELSON, James Wharton, Professor of Clinical Surgery; A.B., St. John's College, 
1918; M.D., University of Maryland, 1925. 

NOVIN, Neil, Instructor in Surgery; B.A., New York University, 1951; M.D., State 
University of New York, 1955. 

OLLODART, Robert M., Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.A., University of 
Buffalo, 1955; M.D., University of Buffalo, 1956. 

OROURK, Thomas R., Professor of Otolaryngology; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1921. 

OTENASEK, Frank Joseph, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; A.B., Loyola 
College, 1933; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1937. 

PESSAGNO, Daniel James, Professor of Clinical Surgery; B.A., Rock Hill College, 
1916; M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

PHELAN, Patrick Carey, Jr., Associate in Surgery; B.A., Loyola College, 1935 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 

PIERPONT, Ross Z., Assistant in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1939 
M.D., 1940. 

PLASSE, Jerome S., Instructor in Plastic Surgery; A.B., Columbia College, 1955 
M.D., New York University, 1959. 

PORTER, Harry Primrose, Assistant in Otolaryngology; A.B., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1939; M.D., 1943. 

POWDER, James Richard, Instructor in Urology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 
1949; M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 

RABUZZI, Daniel D., Instructor in Otolaryngology; A.B., Howard College, 1957; 
M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1961. 

REVER, William Benjamin, Jr., Associate in Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1950. 



University of Maryland • 79 

ROSELL, Luis A., Instructor in Otolaryngology; M.D., University of Seville, 

Spain, 1952. 
ROSIN, John David, Associate in Surgery; B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1938; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1942; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952. 
RUDO, Alvin D., Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 

1943; M.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 
SCHERLIS, Irving, Assistant in Urology; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1940; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 
SCHIRMER, Horst K. A., Associate Professor of Surgery; B.S., Graf-Zeppelin-Real 

Gymnasium, Germany, 1951; M.D., Albert Ludvvig University, Freiburg, 

Germany, 1956. 
SCHME1SSER, Gerhard, Associate Professor of Surgery; A.B., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1949; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1953. 
SETTLE, William Booth. Associate in Surgery; A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 

1930; M.D., 1933. 
SHARRETT, John Oliver, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; M.D., University 

of Maryland, 1952. 
SIWINSKI, Arthur George, Assistant Professor of Surgery; A.B., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
SNYDER, Jerome, Instructor in Otolaryngology; Ph.G., University of Maryland, 

1928; B.S., University of Maryland, 1930; M.E)., University of Maryland, 1932. 
STEENBURG, Richard W., Associate Professor of Surgery; B.S., Stanford Uni- 
versity, 1944; M.D., Harvard University, 1948. 
STEWART, Edwin Harvey, Jr., Associate in Surgery; M.D., University of Mary- 
land. 1943. 
STICHEL, Frederick Louis, Jr., Assistant in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of 

Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1944. 
STRAM, John R., Instructor in Otolaryngology; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1957; M.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 
SUPIK, William Joseph, Associate in Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 1940; 

M.D., 1940. 
TANSEY, John J., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Brown University, 1942; 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 
THOMPSON, Raymond K., Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1937; M.D., 1941. 
TOULSON, W. Houston Toulson, M.D., Professor of Urology, Emeritus. 
VOSHELL, Allen Fiske, Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus; A.B., Johns 

Hopkins University, 1915; M.D., 1919. 
WALDER, Arnold I., Assistant Professor of Surgery; B.A., Tufts University, 1954; 

M.A., University of Minnesota, 1958; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1967; 

M.D., State University of New York, 1958. 
WALKER, William Wallace, Associate Professor of Surgery; B.S., University of 

West Virginia, 1921; M.D., University of Maryland, 1923. 
WEINER, Israel Howard, Instructor in Neurological Surgery; B.A., Johns Hopkins 

University, 1949; M.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 
WEISS, Harold R., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; B.S., University of Maryland, 

1952; M.D., 1954. 
WENZLAFF, Edward F., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery; A.B., Columbia College, 

1948; M.D., University of Buffalo, 1954. 
WHITE, John P., Ill, Instructor in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 
WIEDMAN, Alfred K., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery; M.D., University of 

Heidelberg, 1956. 
WILHELMSEN, Hans R., Instructor in Plastic Surgery; D.D.S., University of 

Maryland, 1955; M.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 
WILL, David Reid, Instructor in Surgery; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 



80 • School of Medicine 

YEAGER, George Herschel, Professor of Clinical Surgery; B.S., University of 

West Virginia, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1929. 
YOUNG, John David, Jr., Professor of Urology and Head, Division of Urological 

Surgery; B.A., Bridgewater College, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 
ZINN, Waitman F., M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology, Emeritus. 

Consultants, Fellows, Research Fellows, and Research Assistants 

HAWTHORNE, Ilse H., Research Assistant in Thoracic Surgery. 

IMASHUKU, Shinsaku, Research Associate Thoracic Surgery. 

KIRBY, William H., Jr., Research Associate in Thoracic Surgery. 

KRAMER, David N., Research Associate in Surgery. 

LA BROSSE, Elwood, Research Associate Professor in Thoracic Surgery. 

MASAITIS, Ceslovas, Research Associate in Thoracic Surgery. 

MENDONCA, Paulo P., Research Associate in Urology. 

PADGET, Dorcas H., Research Associate in Neurosurgery. 

TINGEY, Henry B., Consultant-Biostatistician in Thoracic Surgey. 

Lecturers 
BEEBY, James L. 



Organization of the Curriculum 
and Courses of Instruction 



Anatomy 83 

Anesthesiology 85 

Biological Chemistry 86 

Biophysics 86 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology 88 

International Medicine 89 

Medicine 90 

Arthritis 93 

Cardiology 93 

Clinical Pathology 93 

Dermatology 94 

Endocrinology and Metabolism 94 

Gastroenterology 95 

Hypertension and Renal 

Disease 95 

Infectious Diseases 96 

Physical Diagnosis 96 

Pulmonary Diseases 96 

Microbiology 97 

Neurology 98 



Obstretrics and Gynecology ... 99 

Ophthalmology 100 

Pathology 100 

Neuropathology 101 

Forensic Pathology 102 

Pediatrics 102 

Physiology 103 

Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 105 

Physical Medicine 106 

Psychiatry 107 

Radiology 108 

Surgery 109 

General Surgery 110 

Neurosurgery 110 

Orthopedic Surgery 110 

Otolaryngology Ill 

Thoracic Surgery Ill 

Urologic Surgery Ill 

Physical Therapy 114 



81 




ANATOMICAL HALL 



University of Maryland • 83 
ANATOMY 

Professors: Figge (head of department), Brantigan and Krahl. 
Associate Professors: Mech, O'Morchoe, Polley and Wadsworth. 
Assistant Professors: Donati, Linhardt, Petersen, Ramsay and Rennels. 
Lecturer: Hearn. 
Instructors: Barrett, Bulmash, Jenci, Masters, McFadden and Pfeiffer. 

ANAT 101. Gross and Clinical Anatomy. (288) 

First year. The course gives the student an opportunity to develop a basic 
concept of the morphology of the human body. Groups of four students will 
have the opportunity to dissect the human body. Some lectures will be devoted 
to roentgen anatomy and some to practical clinical aspects of anatomy. 

ANAT 102. Microanatomy. (126) 

First year, first semester. The course presents an integrated study of the 
histology and embryology of the human body. Insofar as possible, the course 
will be correlated with the gross anatomy and neurosciences courses, bio- 
chemistry and physiology. 

ANAT 103. Neurological Sciences. (144) 

First year, first and second semesters. This course combines all of the neuro- 
logical subjects taught in all years of the medical curriculum. In the first year 
it consists primarily of the integrated course of neuroanatomy and neuro- 
physiology with additional contributions from neurology, neuropathology, 
neurosurgery and electroencephalography. The structure and function of the 
central nervous system will be presented simultaneously. The course will involve 
dissections of the human brain, examination of stained microscopic sections of 
various levels of the brain stem and laboratory experience involving the study 
of functional aspects of the nervous system. 

ANAT 105. Genetics. (18) 

First year, first semester. This course consists of a series of one-hour lectures 
which include a consideration of the principles of genetics, biochemical 
genetics, radiation genetics, immunogenetics, and microbial genetics. Special 
emphasis is placed on the importance, understanding and application of 
genetics to health and disease. 

ANAT 106. Correlative Anatomy. (16) Elective 

Each week during the first year, patients will be demonstrated and the anatomi- 
cal features of the case will be stressed to give the student a concept of the 
relationship of the anatomy to clinical subjects. 

For Graduates 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are the Doctor 
of Philosophy and the M.D.-Ph.D. 

ANAT 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body. (9) 

Same course as ANAT 101, but on a more advanced level. It can be taken 
by graduate as well as postgraduate students when space is available. Labora- 
tory fee, $25.00. (Figge, Staff) 

ANAT 202. Microanatomy. (6) 

Same course as ANAT 102, but on a more advanced level. Laboratory fee, 
$15.00. (Figge, Donati, O'Morchoe) 

ANAT 203. Neurological Sciences. (4) 

Same course as ANAT 103, but with additional work of a more advanced 
nature. Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Interdepartmental Committee) 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 



University of Maryland • 85 

ANAT 205. Genetics. (2) 

Same course as ANAT 105, but on a more advanced level. (Petersen) 

ANAT 206. Correlative Anatomy. (1,1) 

Same course as ANAT 106, but examinations will be given. 

(Figge, Staff and clinical departments) 

ANAT 207. Fetal and Infant Anatomy. (2) 

First semester, fifteen periods of three hours each, to be arranged. This course 
is open to graduate students and postgraduates interested in pediatrics. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Krahl) 

ANAT 208. Studies on Normal and Atypical Growth. (2) 

Lectures in problems of growth. Two hours per week, time to be arranged. 
Eighteen weeks. (Figge) 

ANAT 210. Special Problems in Neuroanatomy. (2) 

This course will deal with specific problems in the field of neuroanatomy, 
depending on the interests of the sponsor. It will consist of lectures, seminars, 
and specific laboratory assignments. (Figge, Staff) 

ANAT 399. Research in Anatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Research work may be taken in any one 
of the branches of anatomy. (Figge, Staff) 

ANAT 499. Dissertation Research in Anatomy. (Figge, Staff) 



anesthesiology 

Professors: Helrich (head of department), Gold. 
Associate Professor: McAslan and Staff. 

During the first two years, the Department of Anesthesiology presents several 
lectures in the courses taught by the various preclinical departments. These lec- 
tures are intended to illustrate the application of the basic sciences to the clinical 
practice of anesthesiology. Emphasis is placed upon the physiologic and pharma- 
cologic aspects of preanesthetic medication, choice of anesthesia, and manage- 
ment of patients during surgery. 

ANES 101. Introduction to Anesthesiology. 

Third year. The third year class is given a series of one hour lectures dealing 
with preoperative preparation and inhalation, local and spinal anesthesia. An 
effort is made to correlate the basic sciences with their clinical application. 

ANES 102. Introduction to Anesthesiology. 

Fourth year. Each senior student spends two weeks in the operating rooms 
of the University Hospital or one of its affiliated hospitals administering 
anesthesia. Informal group meetings are held to emphasize factors affecting 
the anesthetic management of patients and to discuss pertinent anesthetic 
problems. The students also attend the regularly scheduled staff conferences 
in Anesthesiology. 

Art as Applied to Medicine is Now Renamed ILLUSTRATIVE SERVICES 



86 • School of Medicine 
BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professors: Adams (head of department), Pomerantz. 
Associate Professors: Bode and Frank. 
Assistant Professors: Kirtley and Gryder. 
Instructor: Brown. 
Associate: Chang. 

For Medical Students 

Biochemistry, as an introduction to the later preclinical subjects and to 
clinical studies, is presented within Basic Med. Sci 102, running throughout 
the first year. During the first semester, emphasis is on biophysics, biochemistry, 
and general physiology, whereas mammalian physiology occupies most of the 
second semester. The biochemistry portion of this course is oriented toward 
mammalian metabolism and enzymology, but also stresses general and com- 
parative biochemistry. The assigned laboratory time will be devoted to tutorial 
work under a faculty member from one of the participating departments, as 
described under the first-year program. 

All graduate courses as well as research opportunities are open to properly 
qualified medical students who may enroll either formally or informally. 

For Graduate Students 

The graduate degree offered is Doctor of Philosophy. 

Biochem. 201. (6) This comprises the lectures of the first semester of 
Basic Med. Sci. 102 together with conferences and other special exercises. 
Laboratory time is devoted to faculty-supervised laboratory or library research 
as described under "For Medical Students." 

Biochem. 202, 203. Advanced Biochemistry (2,2). A sequence of specific 
advanced courses, each a semester in length. Course titles have been: Enzy- 
mology (Spring 1968— (Kirtley)); Biochemical Genetics (Fall, 1968— (Bode)). 
Planned for 1969: Spring: Biochemical Mechanisms of Hormone Action 
(Pomerantz); Fall: Amino Acid Metabolism (Adams). Spring, 1970: (Micro- 
bial Biochemistry and Metabolism (Frank)). 

Prerequisite, Basic Med. Sci. 102, or Biochem. 201 or equivalent. 

Biochem. 204, 205. Seminar (1,1). Reports on current literature or re- 
search in progress. Prerequisite, same as Biochem. 202, 203. 

Biochem. 399. Research. Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 

BIOPHYSICS 

Professors: Mullins (chairman of department) and Sjodin. 
Assistant Professors: Hybi and Geduldig. 

The Department of Biophysics offers graduate courses of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The study programs 
are flexible and depend on the preparation and interests of the student. Detailed 
requirements are available from the department of Biophysics. 

It is recommended that students studying for the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy in Biophysics select a minor in either physics, chemistry, or mathematics. 



University of Maryland • 87 

A number of fellowships are available for beginning students; after the first 
year of graduate study, research assistantships are available. Inquiries should be 
directed to the department; deadline for applications is March 1. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BIOPHYS 100D. Introduction to Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, 
Math. 18, 19. An introduction to the study of living systems applying the 
methods of physics and chemistry. The cell as a physicochemical system and 
experimental methods for investigation, nerve impulse conduction and excita- 
tion, the interaction of radiation with living material; the structure and 
properties of muscle tissue, connective tissue, and their proteins. 

(Staff) 

BIOPHYS 101D. Introduction to Biophysics. (3) 

Continuation of Biophys. 100D. Given when number of students warrants. 

BIOPHYS 102D. Biophysics of Radiation. (2) 

Fall semester, even years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, 
Phys. 10, 11. An advanced study of the interaction of radiation with living 
matter and with molecules of biological interest. Dosimetry problems and 
some bio-medical applications will be considered. (Mullins, Sjodin, Robinson) 

BIOPHYS 103D. Laboratory Techniques in Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, 1969-1970. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the stafT. Training in the use 
of radioactive isotopes, radioactive counting equipment, and bioelectric measur- 
ing instruments applied to the study of membranes; viscosity, optical rotation. 
protein titrations, spectroscopy, conductivity, as applied to fiber forming pro- 
teins. Laboratory fee, $20.00. (Staff) 

BIOPHYS 104D. Seminar in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Seminars on various 
biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate students, and guest speakers. 

(Staff) 

For Graduates 

BIOPHYS 200D. Advanced and Theoretical Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, odd years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 
101, or consent of staff. An advanced and critical analysis of experimental 
findings in terms biophysical theory. (Staff) 

BIOPHYS 201D. Membrane Biophysics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, Math. 20, 21. 
Diffusion in and through membranes developed from first principles with special 
reference to problems of ion transport in biological membranes. (Sjodin) 

BIOPHYS 203D. X-ray Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures a week. An introduction to molecular structure determination 
by the techniques of x-ray diffraction. Emphasis upon problems arising in 
structural studies of molecules of biological origin. (Hybl) 

BIOPHYS 205D. Colloquium in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, Biophys. 104 or consent of the staff. Colloquia on various bio- 
physical topics given by the staff, graduate students and guest speakers. (Staff) 



88 • School of Medicine 

BIOPHYS 499D. Research in Biophysics. (3-6) 

Required of students planning to take the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
Biophysics. (Staff) 

CELL BIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: Aposhian (head). 

Associate Professors: O'Neill, Ludlum, Ryser and DuPraw. 

Assistant Professor: Brown. 

PHARMACOL 101. Medical Pharmacology. (233) 

Second year. The purpose of this course is to present the interactions of thera- 
peutic and other agents with biological systems ranging from isolated enzyme 
systems through more complex systems, including animals and man. 

For Graduates 

The graduate program in Cell Biology and Pharmacology is designed for 
students seeking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. For students studying for 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine, a program is available for continued study 
and research toward a Ph.D. 

PHARMACOL 201. f. s. General Pharmacology. (9) 

Same as 101, for students majoring in pharmacology. Additional instruction 
and collateral reading are required. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

PHARMACOL 205. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the amount of work ac- 
complished. 

PHARMACOL 206. Pharmacologic Methods. 

Maximum credits, 4. Credit in accordance with the work accomplished. 

PHARMACOL 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmacodynamics. (2, 2) 

PHARMACOL 209. Biochemical Pharmacology. (2) 

PHARMACOL 210. History of Pharmacology. (2) 

PHARMACOL 211. The Biology of Macromolecules. (4) 

ILLUSTRATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF 
Thomas M. Stevenson, Director 

This facility is maintained to supply Audio-visual Aids to Medical School 
faculty and staff for teaching, research, and publication purposes. The Depart- 
ment also supports student activities which require this type of service. The 
primary services are: Illustration, Photography, Offset Printing, and Projections. 

illustration 

Includes comprehensive renderings of surgical and clinical techniques, ana- 
tomical renderings, statistical charts and other graphic representation, simple 
and comprehensive design of flyers, brochures, posters, etc. It also includes 
layout and paste-up for offset printing and photographic copying. In addition 
this section is responsible for the design of motion picture titles, displays, and 
exhibits. 



University of Maryland • 89 

photography 

Photography includes ordinary photographic copying of flat material such 
as written matter, x-rays, laboratory tracings and data, etc. Photography of 
specimens, equipment setups, surgical, clinical, and laboratory activities. Also, 
Public Relations, archives, and portraiture for school related purposes. The 
Department is equipped for photomicrography (large and small format), slide 
duplication and motion picture photography. The Department further acts as 
a collecting station for commercial processing of color photography by other 
departments. 

OFFSET PRINTING 

This section is maintained to furnish volume duplication and facsimile print- 
ing. The plant is equipped for graphc arts finishing such as collating, folding, 
stapling, punching, cutting and padding. 

PROJECTIONS 

The Department is responsible for the purchase, maintenance, and operation 
of projection equipment for use in classroom instruction. Projectors are perm- 
anently located in a number of classrooms and lecture halls. Additional equip- 
ment is stored in the Department for use in less organized areas. A room with 
equipment is available within the Department for reviewing projection material. 

INTERNATIONAL MEDICINE 

Professors: Clyde (head of department), Barnett, Klimt, McCrumb and 

MlDDLEBROOK. 

Associate Professors: Aziz, Meinert, Stauffer and Woodbury. 
Assistant Professors: Anthony, Baker, Barry, Begum, Canner, Carozza, 
Knatterud, Krol, McCarthy and Wolfe. 

International Centers for Medical Research and Training were created under 
the aegis of the National Institutes of Health in accordance with objectives of 
the International Health Research Act of 1960 (Public Law 86-610, July 12, 
1960). It was the purpose of this act to advance the status of international health 
research and research training. Congress further expressed the hope that "a pro- 
gram through United States universities for the early development of research 
and research training centers with adequate field opportunities for international 
studies" would be established. This program under the direction of the Office of 
International Research of the National Institutes of Health provided for the 
establishment of a research and research training center at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore in March of 1961. The University 
of Maryland International Center for Medical Research and Training has suc- 
ceeded in the establishment of domestic and overseas research-training programs 
in Baltimore, Maryland, and Lahore, West Pakistan, with the following objec- 
tives: 

1. To offer research training in international health problems to American 
physicans and allied professional workers as well as their Pakistani 
counterparts. 

2. To conduct medical and allied research at the domestic and overseas sites; 
the mechanisms for such training. 



90 • School of Medicine 

3. To create, through scientific endeavors, an atmosphere of mutual under- 
standing and friendship between the host nation and the United States. 

In July of 1963 international health activities of the University of Maryland 
were consolidated under an Institute of International Medicine with depart- 
mental status within the School of Medicine. Under the present administrative 
arrangement, the International Center for Medical Research and Training forms 
the nucleus of the Institute into which other international and domestic pro- 
grams are incorporated. 

The Institute of International Medicine is composed of Divisions of Epi- 
demiology and Biostatistics, Experimental Pathology, Medical Entomology and 
Ecology, and Virus Diseases, and derives major support in addition from the 
Departments of Microbiology, Medicine, and Pediatrics. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Research Associate program of the International Center provides for 
postdoctoral training in the various disciplines represented within the Institute 
of International Medicine and affiliated Departments of Mcrobiology, Medi- 
cine, and Pediatrics. In general, the program encompasses three years, two of 
which are spent on a field assignment at the Pakistan Medical Research Center 
in Lahore. 

Upon entry into the program each Research Associate works out in advance 
with his advisor a definitive plan of study and research. Assignment to Divisions 
and appointment to advisors depends upon the candidate's background, interests, 
and needs. The global concept of medicine is emphasized and provision is made 
for more advanced training in specialized aspects of international health. Fol- 
lowing a basic orientation course, each Research Associate proceeds into one or 
another of specialized training areas. During this time he becomes identified with 
one of the Institute's Divisions and begins preceptor type training through the 
mechanism of a research project which also prepares the candidate for field work 
in Pakistan. Postdoctoral candidates with Ph.D., M.D., and D.V.M. degrees 
enter in one of several specialized programs soon after appointment to the pro- 
gram. These include infectious diseases-microbiology, nutrition, medical ento- 
mology, and epidemiology. In many instances overlapping interests will result 
in combined training and joint research projects. In some cases, additional clini- 
cal training of physician candidates will be considered essential to the success of 
the overall program. 

Applications should be submitted through the Head of the Department. 

MEDICINE 

Professors: Woodward (head of department), Connor, Ellis, Krause, 
T. Morrison, Revell, H. Robinson, L. Scherlis, V. Smith, Tigertt and 

WlSWELL. 

Associate Professors: Bereston, Borges, Cotter, Eastland, Ellinger, Greis- 
man, Gundry, Hetherington, Hornick, Karns, Lisansky, Lub/sh, S 
Morrison, Parker, H. Raskin, J. Raskin, R. Robinson, Schubart, Simp- 
son, Singleton and Workman. 

Assistant Professors: Beacham, Burnett, Carroll, Charache, J. Cohen, 
Ebeling, Entwisle, Evans, Freeman, Jacobson, Jiji, Leach, Lee, Legum, 
Lerner, D. Levy, Merrill, Muller, Neish, Reiter, S. Scherlis, Serra, 
Shapiro, S. Smith, Swisher, Wisseman, Zieve and Staff. 






■J! 



if- 






STUDENT UNION BUILDING 



92 • School of Medicine 

MED 102. Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 

Third year. This course consists of a clinical clerkship on the medical wards 
of the University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore City Hospitals, Mercy or 
Maryland General Hospitals, for a period of nine weeks. Students are re- 
sponsible, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, laboratory 
examinations, and progress notes of assigned cases. They attend ward rounds 
and conferences in general medicine with the Resident Staff, Attending Phy- 
sicians, and Chiefs of Service. For an additional three weeks students are 
assigned for work in neurology or pulmonary diseases, including tuberculosis 
and attend special ward rounds and teaching conferences in general medicine. 

MED 103. The Principles of Medicine. 

Third year. A short series of lectures in General Medicine, and Clinical Medi- 
cine are given to the entire junior class. 

MED 104. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 

Fourth year. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards of the University of 
Maryland Hospital, Mercy Hospital, Maryland General Hospital or York 
Hospital for four weeks. An additional four-week period is spent in the Medi- 
cal Out-Patient Department where instruction is given in General Medicine and 
the medical specialties. During this tour the senior students participate in the 
workup of chronically ill patients at the Montebello Chronic Disease Hospital, 
and attend consultative rounds in cardiology, infectious diseases, gastro- 
enterology, arthritis, radioisotopes, neurology, hematology, endocrinology, and 
pulmonary diseases on the wards of the University Hospital. 

Selected students who have completed the junior year may take Medicine 
104 during the summer months. Application should be made to the Department 
Head prior to March 1 of the current year. Those students completing the 
course successfully will be assigned elective time during the academic year. 
This program is designed to foster research for promising students and to 
provide for more intensive training in the fundamentals of clinical medicine. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Students who have completed their junior year are encouraged to seek ad- 
ditional training during the summer months preceding their senior studies. This 
training may be obtained in one of several ways. A limited number of students 
are appointed to Clinical Clerkships on the Medical Wards of the University 
Hospital. In these positions, they are responsible, under supervision, for the his- 
tory, physical examination, laboratory studies, and progress notes of assigned 
cases. 

In addition, certain of the medical subspecialty divisions provide specialized 
training for students as Summer Fellows during the summer months. The ap- 
plicant is encouraged to apply directly to the Division Head. These fellowships 
enable the student to become acquainted with the various specialized diagnostic 
and research techniques, the clinical problems and therapeutic regimens peculiar 
to each of the medical subspecialties. Summer Fellowships are available in the 
following Divisions: Cardiology, (2 appointments), Dermatology (2 appoint- 
ments), Endocrinology (2 appointments), Gastroenterology (2 appointments), 
Hematology (2 appointments), Renal Hypertension (2 appointments), Infectious 
Diseases (2 appointments), Arthritis (1 appointment), Radioisotopes (1 appoint- 
ment), Pulmonary Diseases (2 appointments), and Clinical Physiology (2 ap- 
pointments). Interested applicants should contact the respective Division Head 
prior to January 1 of the year in which the fellowship is desired. In many in- 



University of Maryland • 93 

stances a fellowship award is made providing remumeration for two or three of 
the summer months. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

These are available in the various specialties of Medicine. For details see 
specific division. 

The Department of Medicine, for administrative purposes, is divided into ten 
Divisions. Each of these Divisions participates in the major courses taught by 
the Department. In addition, a number of specialized courses and postgraduate 
fellowships are offered by the Divisions. 

DIVISION OF ARTHRITIS 

Doctors: Barth (head of division), Kochman and Staff. 
MED 105. Division Rounds. 

Third year. Elective. 
MED 105 A. Outpatient Clinic. 

Fourth year. Elective. Weekly arthritis outpatient clinics and attendance at 

weekly arthritis seminar and rounds. 

DIVISION OF CARDIOLOGY 

Doctors: L. Scherlis (head of division), Antlitz, Dembo, Gonzalez, Lee, 
Salan, S. Scherlis, Singleton, Swisher and Staff. 

ID 3. Physical Diagnosis. 

Second year, second semester. The Division of Cardiology participates in 
presenting this course. 

MED 106. Electrocardiography. (16) 

Third and fourth years. Elective. This is an introductory course consisting of 
illustrated group lectures and exercises. 

MED 106A. Outpatient Clinic and Divisions Rounds. 

Third and Fourth year. Elective weekly clinic and attendance at rounds. 

fellowships 

These are available to selected postgraduate applicants. The Fellow participates 
in the activities of the Division, including cardiac catheterization, electrocardi- 
ography, phonocardiography, and vectorcardiography. Research Fellowships are 
also available. The fellowship begins July 1st of each year. A financial stipend 
is provided. Application is made through the Head of the Division and must be 
completed by October of the preceding year. 

DIVISION OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

Doctors: Spurling (acting head of division), Jiji, Kushner, Lancaster, 
Linthicum, Masters, Miller, Sherrer, Taylor and Zahir. 

MED 101. Clinical Pathology. (128) 

Second year. The course is designed to train the student in the performance 
and interpretation of the fundamental laboratory procedures used in clinical 
diagnosis. During the first semester the basic techniques of hematology as well 



94 • School of Medicine 

as clinical aspects of blood diseases are taught. Blood group immunology in 
relation to transfusion is also covered. In the second semester the performance 
and interpretation of tests used in the diagnosis of renal, hepatic, gastric, pan- 
creatic, and metabolic diseases are considered. A review, with clinical applica- 
tions, of acid-base balance and electrolyte disturbances is included. Methods 
of examination of cerebrospinal fluid, transudates and exudates are taught. 
Elements of clinical parasitology complete the work in this semester. 

Each student provides his own microscope and blood counting equipment. 
A completely equipped locker is provided for each student. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

Two full-time clinical and research fellowships in hematology are available 
to applicants who have had a minimum of one year internship. A financial 
stipend is provided. Application should be made to the Head of the Division. 

DIVISION OF DERMATOLOGY 

Professor: H. M. Robinson, Jr. (head of division). 

Doctors: Bacharach, Bereston, Burnett, Ellis, Hollander, J. Raskin, 
R. C. V. Robinson, Shapiro, Yaffee and Staff. 

MED 107. Introduction to Dermatology. 

Third year. Students are given assigned reading on the more common skin 
eruptions. Nine two hour clinical sessions are held for each quarter of the 
junior class. Individual instruction is given by one of the senior staff members 
emphasizing the pertinent aspects of differential diagnosis. 

MED 108. Practical Exercises in Dermatology. 

Fourth year. Groups of 15 students spend 20 hours in the out-patient depart- 
ment where they are given individual instruction in the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of cutaneous lesions. Emphasis is laid on the relationship of various 
eruptions to systemic conditions. Instruction is given in mycologic technique. 

MED 108A. 

Students who take dermatology for the senior elective receive special training 
in clinical dermatology and the basic sciences as applied to dermatology. 

GRADUATE TRAINING 

The Division of Dermatology is approved by the American Board of Derma- 
tology for a three year period of training which is required by the Board. This 
consists of instruction in the basic sciences (mycology, bacterology, histopath- 
ology, chemistry, and physiology), and instruction in clinical dermatology. 
Emphasis is placed on the relationship of cutaneous lesions to systemic diseases. 
Residents and Fellows spend a part of the training period at the Rosewood School 
for Retarded Children, the Baltimore City Hospitals, and in the private offices 
of the members of the staff. Temporary membership in the dermatologic soci- 
eties is provided under the sponsorship of the Division Head. 

DIVISION OF ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM 

Doctors: Connor (head of division), Wiswell, Workman and Staff. 

Endocrine Clinic — Conference and Rounds. 

Fourth year. Elective. Patients with a variety of endocrine-metabolic diseases 



University of Maryland • 95 

are seen in the Out-Patient Department every Monday afternoon from 1:30 to 
4:00 p.m. This is followed by a Conference in which clinical case material is 
presented for discussion with staff members and students actively participating. 
Every Friday afternoon weekly wards rounds are held. Elective periods for 
concentrated study for 1- to 3-month intervals are available for selected stu- 
dents. Summer fellowships for students are also offered. 

NUCLEAR MEDICINE 

Dr. Workman (head) 

PHARMACOLOGY 201. 

Second year. In cooperation with the Department of Pharmacology, a portion 
of one laboratory session is utilized to demonstrate the accuracy of a radio- 
isotope method of estimating thyroid function. 

MED 110. 

Fourth year elective (Conference Nuclear Medicine). 

Postgraduate Fellowships are available to applicants who have completed 
internship and at least one year of residency training. Opportunities for active 
participation in clinical and research activities are available. Independent re- 
search investigations are encouraged. A financial stipend is provided. Three 
full-time fellowship positions are available. 

Clinical Pathology. 

Second year. In cooperation with the Division of Clinical Pathology two 
lecture-demonstrations are presented emphasizing diagnostic radioisotope pro- 
cedures useful in hematology. 

DIVISION OF GASTROENTEROLOGY 

Doctors: H. Raskin (head of division), V. Smith, W. Inayatullah and 

Staff. 

The Division of Gastroenterology presents a concentrated two weeks course 
in applied basic science to gastrointestinal disorders in the sophomore year. 
Weekly G-I conferences are held. A monthly combined G.I. -Radiology meeting 
is held on the second Wednesday of each month and a combined G.I. -Pathology 
session is held on the fourth Tuesday of each month. The outpatient clinic is 
held every Thursday. 

fellowships 

Senior students wishing to take an elective month of gastroenterology are 
most welcome. Summer student fellowships are available. Those interested in 
a two year postgraduate fellowship should apply to the Head of the Division. 

DIVISION OF HYPERTENSION AND RENAL DISEASES 

Doctors: Lubash (head of division), Borges, Lewandowski and Staff. 

MED 110. Clinical Elective. 

Fourth year. Elective. The division provides consultation service for patients 
with a variety of hypertensive and renal diseases. A weekly outpatient session 
is also conducted. An active dialysis and transplantation program has been 
developed in conjunction with the Department of Surgery and its Division of 
Urology. There are daily ward rounds and a weekly conference. Students 



96 • School of Medicine 

may participate in all these activities for elective periods of one month or 

longer. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

These are available to selected postgraduate applicants. The Fellow partici- 
pates in investigative and clinical activities of the division. A financial stipend 
is provided. Application is made through the Head of the Division. 

DIVISION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES 

Doctors: Hornick (head of division), L. Fiset, Rapoport, M. Snyder, Togo, 
and Staff. 

Conferences are held each Thursday afternoon dealing with selected topics 
in infectious diseases to which students are invited. 

CLINICAL ELECTIVE 

Special programs are provided for senior students during their elective periods. 

POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The division sponsors four Fellows who receive instruction in laboratory 
techniques and clinical investigation. Fellows participate in all functions of the 
division, including collaboration in investigative problems. A financial stipend 
is provided. Application is made through the Head of the Division. 

STUDENT FELLOWSHIPS 

The division offers two fellowships for support and supervision of students 
throughout their medical school career. These fellowships provide special 
instruction and experience in infectious diseases. Application is made through 
the Head of the Division. 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS 

Doctor: Cotter (head of division) and Staff. 

ID 2. Introduction of Clinical Medicine. 

Second year. The Division participates in presenting this course. 

ID 3. Physical Diagnosis. 

Second year. This course implements ID. 2. and provides the student with 
bedside instruction in physical diagnosis. Small tutorial groups are formed, 
each under the direction of an instructor. In the first fr e weeks, experience 
in physical examination of normal individuals is given onj afternoon weekly. 

During the remainder of the year, students become acquainted with abnormal 
signs through examination of hospitalized patients. For five weeks the Division 
of Cardiology gives instruction in the physical examination of the heart. There- 
after, sections are assigned in rotation to the Departments of Neurology and 
Pediatrics for instruction in these specialties. 

DIVISION OF PULMONARY DISEASES 

Doctors: Simpson (head of division), Blide, Kerr, Marine, Ruche, Spicer 
and Staff. 



University of Maryland • 97 



MED 113. Clinical Clerkship in Pulmonary Diseases. 

Third year. This 3 week period of training is given on the chest ward service 
and in the chest clinic. Students are assigned hospital patients whom they 
work up, follow, and present at rounds and at conference. Clinic and bedside 
teaching emphasizes development of the technique of the medical examination 
which is correlated with x-ray study. The seminars and conferences emphasize 
an understanding of the basic processes involved in respiratory health and 
disease. 

Fourth year. Elective. The chest clinic provides an opportunity for clinical 
and physiologic study of patients with chronic bronchopulmonary disease, 
especially chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Emphasis during this elective 
period is placed on development of understanding of principles and techniques 
of testing of cardio-pulmonary function testing. 



STUDENT FELLOWSHIP 

The service offers three such positions for the support and supervision of 
students throughout their medical school career. These fellowships will provide 
special graded instruction and experience in research methodology, epidemiol- 
ogy, physical diagnosis, clinical chest disease, and pulmonary physiology. The 
individual student during his medical school career, will gradually be introduced 
to clinical medical research so that he may plan and complete a research project 
during this period. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Wisseman (head of department). 

Research Professor: Traub. 

Associate Professors: Eylar, P. Fiset, Kessel and M. Snyder. 

Assistant Professors: McCrumb, Myers, Rosenzweig and Staff. 

Instructors: Fabrikant. 

MICROBIOL 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (180) 

Second year, first semester. This course is intended to introduce the student 
to basic concepts of microbial agents and immunologic mechanisms necessary 
to understand infectious diseases, public health, and diseases of immunologic 
origin. Properties of microorganisms are considered in relation to pathogenesis 
of infections, mechanisms of tissue damage and host defense mechanisms. 
Bacterial, fungal, viral, and rickettsial agents are studied in both lecture and 
laboratory. 

For Graduates 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
and encourages especially those who wish to enroll in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. 
program. While the degree of Master of Science may be offered in special 
instances, priority for research facilities will be given aspirants to the Ph.D. 
degree. These courses are available only by prior arrangement with the Staff. 

MICROBIOL 201. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group 
conferences per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course, intended for the 
serious advanced student of medical microbiology, is built upon the framework 
of Microbiol. 101 supplemented with advanced readings and laboratory work. 



98 • School of Medicine 

MICROBIOL 203. Microbial Physiology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week supplemented witb 
demonstrations. By consent of instructor. 

MICROBIOL 206,207. Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate students, staff, 
and guests participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of subjects of 
special interest or pertinent to graduate training program. 

MICROBIOL 209. Special Topics. 

(Permission and credit arranged individually.) This course provides the op- 
portunity for the graduate student to pursue under supervision subjects of 
special interest not offered in other formal courses. 

MICROBIOL 210. Advanced Virology and Rickettsiology Lecture. (3) 

This course considers the general properties of viruses and rickettsiae, methods 
for studying them, and finally concentrates on agents of medical importance. 
Special emphasis is placed on the host-parasite relationship, characterization 
of the various viral and rickettsial agents and on biological and ecological 
factors. Registration is by permission of instructor only. The course will be 
given on the average on alternate years in the Spring semester. There are two 
weekly sessions of 90 minutes each. Prerequisite: Microbiol. 201 or equivalent. 

MICROBIOL 211. Virology and Rickettsiology Laboratory. (2) 

This course is the laboratory counterpart of Microbiol. 210. It is designed to 
familiarize the student with the major techniques for the study of virus and 
rickettsial agents, and to give him first hand experience with a variety of the 
more common agents. Registration is by permission of instructor only. Be- 
cause of the limited facilities and the nature of the work, it may be necessary 
to restrict registration in this course according to the following priority: students 
majoring in medical microbiology, then students minoring in microbiology and, 
finally, others. The laboratory consists of two formal sessions per week; how- 
ever, the nature of the work frequently requires additional participation 
throughout the week. 

MICROBIOL 399. Research (for thesis problem) 
Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 

NEUROLOGY 

Professors: Nelson (head of department), Merlis, Mayer and Van 

Buskirk. 
Associate Professors: Heck and Teitelbaum. 

Assistant Professors: Kramer, Mosser, Price. Oleynick and Sutton. 
Instructor: Hulfish. 

NEURO 101. Introduction to Clinical Neurology. (16) 

(Second year.) Lecture-demonstrations in neurology are presented, empha- 
sizing correlation of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the nervous system 
with clinical neurology. 

ID 3. Neurologic Aspects of Physical Diagnosis. (8) 

(Second year.) The Department participates in the physical diagnosis course 
with instruction in the performance of the normal neurologic examination as 
well as examination of selected patients with neurologic disorders. 

NEURO 102. Clinical Clerkship in Neurology. 

Third year. Available for a portion of the third year class. This course consists 
of a clerkship on the neurology ward of the University Hospital for approxi- 



University of Maryland • 99 

mately four weeks. Under house staff and attending staff supervision, the stu- 
dents are responsible for the total care of the patient with neurologic disease. 
They may assist in the performance of some procedures and attend rounds 
and conferences in neurology. 

NEURO 103. Practical Clinical Neurology. (10) 

Third year. A series of lecture-demonstrations given to the entire third year 
class with emphasis on diagnosis and treatment of the common neurologic 
diseases. 

NEURO 104. 

Fourth year. Elective time of 4 weeks may be spent in the Department of 
Neurology, either on the ward or in one of the research laboratories. 

SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 

Students who have completed their first, second, or third years and have an 
interest in the neurologic sciences may apply for additional training in clinical 
neurology or in one of the research laboratories of the Department of Neurology. 
Qualified students may receive remuneration for their summer work. 

POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 

There is a fully approved three year program for specialty training in Neurol- 
ogy at the University Hospital. This provides for clinical training as well as a 
rotation through the associated basic science disciplines. Fellowships with a 
stipend are provided and begin July 1 each year. For further information, con- 
tact the Head of the Department. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Professors: Haskins (head of department) and Kaltreider. 

Associate Professors: Middleton and Munford. 

Associate Clinical Professors: Cornbrooks and McNally. 

Assistant Professors: Durkan, Garcia, Misenhimer, Moszkowski, Rimer and 

VlLLASANTA. 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Brady, Cohen, Davis, Diggs, Dixon, Dumler, 

Kardash, Martin, Morris, Seegar and Staff. 
Instructors: Ances, Baca and Westney. 

OB-GYN 101. Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Third year. Students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology for a period 
of six weeks. As clinical clerks, they participate in the original diagnostic 
studies, pelvic surgical procedures, and postoperative care of hospitalized 
patients. 

Daily rounds, seminars, and departmental conferences with the attending 
staff and house officers aid the student in the interpretation and correlation with 
his observations, diagnoses, and the several therapeutic regimens. 

Specific instruction is provided in pathology, basic science, and endocrinology 
as related to obstetrics and gynecology. Obstetrical manikin exercises, prenatal 
examination, and gynecologic outpatient care are accomplished in the Out- 
patient Department. 



100 • School of Medicine 

OB-GYN 102. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Fourth year. Students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baltimore 
Oity Hospital for a period of four weeks. The student rotates through the 
accident room, delivery floor and maternity division. He participates in daily 
rounds, deliveries, postpartum care, and seminars. Specific instruction in can- 
cer, obstetrical complications, and pelvimetry is provided. 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Professor: Richards (head of department). 
Associate Professors: Fox, Michaelis, Schocket and Cavonius. 
Assistant Professors: Bernstein, Boaz, Meisels and Rubacky. 
Research Associate: Hilz. 

Instructors: Braver, Creamer, Feinberg, Goldberg, Katzen Kogan, Kohl- 
hepp, Kronthal, Ortel, O'Rourk and Ross. 

OPHTHAL 101. Introduction to Ophthalmology. 

Third year. A lecture course for the entire class covers the fundamentals of 
Ophthalmology. Weekly section work, with emphasis on the use of the ophthal- 
moscope, includes discussion periods, demonstrations and clinics. 

OPHTHAL 102. Clinical Ophthalmology. 

Fourth year. Ward rounds, demonstrations, discussion periods and clinics in 
diseases of the eye. 



PATHOLOGY 

full time staff 

Professors: Schultz (acting head of department), Firminger and Wagner. 

Associate Professors: Ming, S. C, Rasmussen and Wood. 

Assistant Professors: Hendrickson, Levin, Ming, P-M. and Parr. 

clinical staff (visiting) 

Professors: Fisher, Merkel, Weinberg and Wright. 

Associate Professors: Freimuth, Lindeberg, Reimann and Toll. 

Assistant Professors: Adams, Burkart, Cranley, Guerin, Hicken, Kiefer, 

Kime, Passen, Reuber, Spitz, Springate and Hameli. 
Instructors: Ferrari, Hoffman and Wilson. 

PATH 101. General, Systemic and Experimental Pathology. (272) 

Second year. This course starts with the study of the basic principles of 
pathology and progresses with the study of diseases of the various organ sys- 
tems. In the second semester instruction in diseases of the organ systems is 
closely correlated with other departmental offerings and Introduction to 
Mechanisms of Disease through the Subject Systems Committees. Teaching 
is chiefly by the case method using fresh and fixed autopsy cases but also 
utilizes gross museum specimens and a set of prepared selected histologic 
slides. Students assist in the performance of autopsies in small groups, prepare 
final protocols, and present the findings and interpretation of the cases to 
others in the class. 

Included in the course is an introduction to experimental pathology by two 
experiments illustrative of basic pathologic principles. 



University of Maryland • 101 

PATH 102. Experimental Pathology. (Hours vary with project chosen.) 
Second year. A limited number of students have the opportunity to participate 
in experimental work. Some carry out a series of 6 experiments selected to 
illustrate the dynamics of disease processes. Others choose some area of the 
Department such as tissue culture, electron microscopy, or cytopathology for 
seminars and the pursuit of an original project under the supervision of a 
member of the Staff. 

PATH 103. Correlative Medical Pathology. (9) 

Third year. This course is given in collaboration with the Department of 
Medicine and consists of a series of conferences with small groups of students, 
an internist and a pathologist. An illustrative clinical case is used as the base 
for discussion of a few selected diseases with particular emphasis on correlating 
the anatomical and functional changes with the clinical disease. 

PATH 104. Surgical Pathology. (16) 

Fourth year. This course consists of a series of rather informal lectures and 
discussions of the pathology of various surgical conditions with small groups of 
students using colored lantern slides, gross museum specimens, a set of prepared 
microscopic slides and current gross surgical specimens. 

PATH 106. Elective Pathology. (115) 

Fourth year. Students may spend a month continuously in pathology as an 
assistant to a resident participating in autopsies, examination of surgical speci- 
mens, and contributing to discussions in the various conferences of the 
Department. 

PATH 107. (56) 

Second year (second semester). A small group of students attend a series of 
round table discussions on the diagnosis of medical diseases by biopsy. The 
course includes microscopic study of the histopathologic findings, their inter- 
pretation and significance with special emphasis on diseases of the liver and 
kidney. 

fellowships (after sophomore year) 

Students may be selected for summer fellowships in pathology or in certain 
instances drop out of the regular curriculum for a year and devote their entire 
time to pathology. They may spend a minor proportion of their time as externs 
in pathology and attending the regular intradepartmental conferences but the 
major part of their time is devoted toward research, with students participating 
in original projects under the supervision of a Staff member. 

DIVISION OF NEUROPATHOLOGY 

Doctors: Wagner (head of division), Parr and Staff. 

Neuropathology is now taught as a part of a newly developed curriculum 
known as the Neurologic Sciences Curriculum. Since 1964, all departments con- 
cerned with the teaching of neurologically related subjects have cooperated in 
the formulation of a single curriculum. All aspects of the neurologic sciences 
are covered in a progressively expanding manner during the 4 years the students 
spend in school. 

Neuropathology is included in the curriculum as follows: 

Neurologic Sciences I: Correlative illustrations are presented as their principal 
anatomic areas are studied. Illustrative material is presented in the section on 
Clinical Anatomical Correlation. 



102 • School of Medicine 

Neurologic Sciences II: A complete course of basic lectures in Neuropathol- 
ogy, demonstrations of typical neuropathology lesions and clinicopathologic 
case studies, becomes a continuing integrated aspect of the Neurologic Science 
Curriculum. 

Neurologic Sciences 111 and IV: Continued specific correlation and periodic 
reviews of Neuropathology is provided during the clinical years. Formal Clin- 
icopathologic Conferences are included. 

DIVISION OF FORENSIC PATHOLOGY 

Doctors: Fisher (head of division), Freimuth, Lindenberg, Schweda, 
Spitz and Springate. 

for graduates 

In addition to teaching basic forensic pathology in the second year course this 
division offers a number of other courses including a graduate program in toxi- 
cology leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
Toxicology. 

LEG MED 201. Legal Medicine. (1) 

One hour of lecture for twelve weeks, 4 hours assigned reading. This course 
embraces a summary of medical jurisprudence including the laws governing the 
practice of medicine, industrial compensation and malpractice, procedings in 
criminal and civil prosecution, medcal evidence and testimony, including medi- 
colegal toxicology. (12 hours). 

LEG MED 202. Toxicology. (10) 

Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per week for 1 year. The lectures in- 
clude discussion of mechanism of action of poisons, lethal doses, antidotes and 
methods of detection and quantitation of poisons in tissues and body fluids. 
There is also included some discussion of industrial toxicology relating in- 
dustrial exposures to toxic substances to effects produced in the worker using 
these materials. The laboratory work embraces practical application of analy- 
tical procedures for the detection and estimation of poisons in post mortem 
tissue samples. 

LEG MED. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to Toxicology. (2) 
Two hours per week for one year. This course includes elementary anatomy 
with normal histology and selected histopathology as it will be seen by the 
toxicologist. It is a correlated course embracing anatomy, basic physiology and 
the alterations in function as well as structure brought about by disease and 
poisoning. 

FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS 

Normal human physiology is presented in the first year in two different 
courses: Basic Medical Sciences 102, and Neurosciences 101. 
LEG MED 205. Research in Toxicology Leading to Preparation of a Thesis 

for the Ph.D. (30) 

PEDIATRICS 

Professors: Cornblath (head of department), Bradley (emeritus), Fink- 

elstein and Hepner. 
Associate Professors: Baldwin, Clemmens, Glaser, Glick, Gorton, Scher- 

lis, Stine, Walker, Weaver and Wells. 



University of Maryland • 103 

Assistant Professors: Ballis, Fineman, Heldrlch, Irwin, Jensen, Kappel- 
man, Kaiser, Knickerbocker, Lentz, London, Maher, Mosser, Nair, 
Schwarz, Seabold, Sigman, Spragins, Ventling and Wapnir. 

PED 100. Elective. 

First year. The opportunity for freshman students to volunteer to follow a 
newborn from birth through four years of age is provided. 

PED 101. Inpatient Clerkship. 

Third year. Students are assigned as clinical clerks for a period of six weeks 
to the pediatric wards of the University of Maryland, Mercy and Baltimore 
City Hospitals. They are responsible for patient care and work with house 
staff and instructors in planning the workup and treatment of assigned patients. 
Ward rounds are attended daily. The students are assigned tutors who meet 
with their students two times weekly. 

Regularly scheduled conferences are held covering x-ray diagnosis, cardiology, 
journal review, chart conferences, neonatal mortality, case discussions and 
metabolic diseases. Discussions cover concepts of the pathophysiology and 
theraputic management of pediatric patients. The total impact of the illness 
on the child and family complex is emphasized. 

PED 102. Ambulatory Patient Clerkship. 

Fourth year. Students may select from a variety of experiences ranging from 
inpatient junior internships to ambulatory care of children in community 
pediatric centers or the pediatric clinics in the outpatient departments of several 
hospitals. These assignments are determined by individual interview between 
the student and a faculty member. 

PED 103. Laboratory Research Problems in Pediatrics. 

Second year. Elective. Students will be required to set up laboratory procedures 
to be used by them in the study of a research problem. Problems will be se- 
lected in order that a fairly complete project can be done by the students in 
their elective time over a period of one year. Emphasis will be made on the 
accuracy and reliability of standard techniques, as applied to the detailed an- 
alysis of their research problem. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors: Blake (head of department), Adelman, Barraclough and 
Shock. 

Associate Professors: Fajer, Glaser, Karpeles, Merlis, Pinter and Solo- 
mon. 

Assistant Professors: Goldman, Jurf and Greisman. 

Physiology 101 consists of lectures, laboratory work, and conferences run- 
ning throughout the first year. The lectures cover principles of physiology. Lab- 
oratory work and the conferences thereon include an introductory series of 
exercises and demonstrations to acquaint students with contemporary techniques 
in this discipline after which time students select an advisor from one of the 
medical school departments and continue their laboratory work on a tutorial 
basis. 

Neurosci. 101 correlates the study of neuroanatomy with neurophysiology 
and introduces related clinical material in lecture and laboratory work. 
Lectures in abnormal human physiology are presented in the second year. 
Advanced seminars (see below) and/or research in special areas of physiology 




t V ^ ■ 



m 



>■■ 




DAVIDGE HALL 



University of Maryland • 105 

are open to interested students who have completed the first year. 

Combined M.D.-M.S. and M.D.-Ph.D. programs, requiring additional course 
work and original research, are offered for highly qualified students. 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The several graduate programs in Physiology are designed for students ori- 
ented toward careers in mammalian physiology, biomedical engineering, ger- 
ontology, or academic medicine. Background in mathematics, physics, and 
chemistry is considered essential and ordinarily only those wishing to complete 
the requirements for a Ph.D., M.D.-Ph.D., or M.D.-M.S. degree will be con- 
sidered. The program in gerontology is given in collaboration with the Gerontol- 
ogy Division of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 
at the Baltimore City Hospitals. The M.D.-Ph.D. and M.D.-M.S. programs are 
given in collaboration with the School of Medicine. Interested students are in- 
vited to write for additional details. 

Graduate students majoring in physiology will ordinarily be expected to take 
Physiology 201 and Neurosci. 201 and those advanced seminars that are perti- 
nent to their areas of interest. Additional course work in anatomy, biophysics, 
biochemistry, pharmacology, mathematics, and/or physics complete the minor 
requirement. Foreign language examinations are required for Ph.D. candidacy 
and original research and a dissertation for attainment of the degree. 

Advanced courses offered by the Physiology Department include: 

Physiology 201 (3, 7) Similar to Physiology 101 but with additional reading 
and conference work. 

Neurosciences 201. (3, 3) Similar to Neurosci. 101 but with additional read- 
ing and conference work. 

Physiol. 202. Cardiovasvular Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 203. Pulmonary Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2) 

Physiol. 206. Seminar. (1) 

Physiol. 207. Physiology of the Central Nervous System. (2) 

Physiol. 208. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System. (2) 

Physiol. 209. General Physiology. (3) 

Physiol. 210. Physiological Control Systems. (3) 

Physiol. 211. Sensory Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 212. Physiology of Reproduction. (2) 

Physiol. 213. Seminar in Neuroendocrinology. (2) 

Physiol. 214. Comparative Adrenal Physiology. (2) 

Physiol. 399. Research. 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION 

Professors: Entwisle (head of department), Henderson, P. Richardson 

and Tayback. 
Associate Professors: Barrett, Dowling, Hellman, Mahoney and Schon- 

FIELD. 

Assistant Professors: Gessner, Hebel, Markush, Reed, A. Richardson and 
Stewart. 



106 • School of Medicine 

PREV MED 164. Introduction to Biostatistics. (45) 

Elective for graduate students in the School of Medicine. The fundamental 
concepts of statistical methodology and its mathematical foundation are dis- 
cussed along with practical application in the fields of biology and medicine. 
The topics to be covered include: probabilistic models, some application of 
probability, sampling distribution, hypothesis testing, experimental design, and 
analysis of variance. 

PREV MED 101. Biostatistics. (36) 

First year, first semester. Each weekly two hour session is divided into a lec- 
ture period followed by small group sessions used for review, discussion or 
practical exercises. This series of lectures and small group sessions illustrates 
the basic methods of statistical analysis and demonstrates their use in several 
areas of clinical practice and investigation. The course will cover the follow- 
ing statistical subjects: concepts of measurement in medicine, analytical methods 
for quantitative and qualitative data, life table method and application to 
medicine, age adjustment and bio-assay. 

PREV MED 102. Epidemiology and Community Medicine. (62) 

Second year, two hours each week. Patterns of illness and medical care are 
discussed, and the role of a variety of health agencies is reviewed. The basic 
methods and application of epidemiology are reviewed and illustrated by con- 
sideration of certain groups of chronic diseases. 

PREV MED 103. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation I. (48) 
During third year the student is assigned a patient with a chronic disease and 
follows this patient and the patient's family, the student serving as a health 
advisor. During this year of practical experience, the student studies in depth 
the medical care and management of his patient, including the use of com- 
munity resources, and the epidemiology of the specific chronic diseases which 
his patient manifests. This family-based program gives the student an oppor- 
tunity to understand comprehensive medical care. 

In addition, the student participates in small group sessions in the area of 
rehabilitation, including comprehensive evaluation services, medical care and 
chronic disease. Part of the student's assignment is at Montebello State 
Hospital. 

PREV MED 104. Applied Preventive Medicine II. (18) 

Fourth year. Each student participates in four seminars devoted to broad con- 
sideration of the application of preventive medicine in general and specialty 
practice. 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION 

Doctors: P. Richardson (head of division), Dowling, Fleischer, Gessner, 
Mahoney, A. Richardson and Staff. 

The Division participates in Preventive Medicine 103 where the students 
receive lecture demonstrations and participate in small group discussions in the 
application of physical medicine procedures and rehabilitation techniques in 
the general practice of medicine. 

The Division also participates in the Physical Diagnosis Course (ID. 3) with 
instruction in the evaluation of motor performance of the extremities. 

Summer fellowships are available for research or clinical training in Physical 
Medicine and Rehabilitation. 



University of Maryland • 107 



PSYCHIATRY 



Professors: Brody (head of department), Bartemeir, Cappon, Farinholt, 

Grenell, Kubie, Monroe, Pope and Rafferty. 
Associate Professors: Ainsworth, Anderson, Balis, Derbyshire, Hartz. 

Huffer, Jacobson, Lisansky, Roseman, Tuerk, Weintraub and Young. 
Research Associate Professors: Findley, Friedenberg, Goldiamond, Raher, 

SlEGMAN AND WlSE. 

Assistant Professors: Albright, Ascher, Blumberg, Boslow, Bradford, 
G. Brown, Clemmens, Cohen, Davis, Donner, Eichler, Faillace, 
Foster, Glaser, Gorwitz, A. Gross, H. Gross, M. Gross, Holden, Hunt, 
Jantz, Kohlmeyer, Kraft, Lasson, Levin, Levy, Mackie, Magruder, 
Maxwell, McCue, Modarressi, Mott, Mourat, Noshpitz, Ozer, Rae- 
Grant, Rappeport, Reed, Robinson, Sakles, Savage, Schleifer, 
Schnaper, Schonfield, Schweig, Shochet, Sila, Taylor, Thompson, 
Ulgur, Vidaver, Whitmarsh and Wilhelmsen. 

Research Assistant Professors: Shaffer and Warthen. 

Instructors: Becker, Burt, Carson, Cicci, Clower, Cohn, Cowen, Croce, 
Chacko, R. Davis, Derbin, Fiedler, Finn, Fitzpatrick, Ford, Freinek, 
Goldmann, Gordon, Gray, G. Gross, Gutches, Hage, Hamilton, 
Harris, Hitchman, Holder, Hulfish, Johnston, Kloor, Lai, Lamb, 
Lewis, Lurie, Martin, McElroy, McNelis, Nabors, Oleynick, Oppen- 
heimer, Phillips, A. Pope, Sack, Saidel, Schamp, Schultz, G. Smith, 
Styrt, Thistel, Trattner, Von Muehlen, Weinstein, Weir, Weisman 
and D. Weiss. 

Research Associate: Blass. 

Lecturers: M. Kramer, Kurland and Novey. 

PSY 101a. Interview Appraisal. 

(Thursday afternoons, 1st semester.) Dr. Brody, Dr. Derbyshire and Staff. 

This course is devoted to providing future physicians with a fundamental 
knowledge of human relationships. Principals and concepts of role theory, inter- 
personal relations, and psychodynamics provide a frame of reference within 
which medical students examine transactional behavior. Each week a physician- 
patient interview is the medium providing students an opportunity to observe 
and critically analyze a transaction. With the leadership of a staff psychiatrist, 
students form small groups after each interview. The groups focus upon ob- 
serving the transactional process. Lectures prior to each patient interview and 
assigned readings provide the substantive material with which students analyze 
human interactions. 

PSY 101b. Health, Illness, and Human Behavior. 

(Thursday afternoons, 2nd semester.) Dr. Derbyshire, Dr. Hunt, and Staff. 

Behaviors associated with illness and health are incorporated into all social 
systems. Anthropologic, psychologic, and sociologic concepts for examining and 
understanding the social behavior of health and illness are stressed. Of central 
concern is the life cycle of families. An examination of the family life process 
through developmental tasks provides an opportunity for viewing health and 
illness in relation to its social system, role theory, culture, motivation, socializa- 
tion, values, attitudes, perception, reference groups, and institutions. 

PSY 101c. Life Situations, Emotions, and Illness. ■ 

(Thursday afternoons, 2nd semester.) Dr. Lisansky, Dr. Derbyshire, and staff. 
This course develops a frame of reference for viewing illness of all kinds. 



108 • School of Medicine 

emotional and physical, from the study of adults with a wide variety of medical 
problems. Much of the material is developed during the course of classroom 
interviews with patients from the medical and surgical wards. Important issues 
include: reactions to stress, and situational and social factors in disease. Em- 
phasis is placed upon observing, understanding, and evaluating the personal and 
social factors in the disease process, in treatment, and in prevention. 

PSY 102. Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry, Psychopathology 
and Psychotherapy. (60) 
Dr. Monroe and staff. 

This course, Tuesday and Thursday morning during the first semester and 
Thursday morning during the second semester, presents to the sophomore medi- 
cal students, by lectures, films, interviews, and discussions, a foundation in 
psychopathology. Each of the reaction types are discussed with signs and symp- 
toms. There is also a discussion of basic defense mechanisms. Psychopathology 
is also correlated with effects of culture, group process, and their relationship 
to the therapeutic task which will be part of the doctor-patient relationship. 

PSY 103. Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship. 

(Third year, 3 weeks.) Dr. Weintraub, Dr. Huffer, Dr. Lisansky, and Dr. 

Wilson. 

Students are assigned to various clinical areas. Under the direction of the 
Liaison Division staff psychiatrists, the students work with medical-surgical 
patients, learning the principals and techniques of interviewing, doctor-patient 
relationship and supportive psychotherapy. On the wards of the Inpatient 
Division, the students are indocrinated into the milieu approach in the treatment 
of psychiatric patients. In addition, they are responsible for the detailed history, 
examination, and treatment of newly admitted psychiatric patients, working 
closely with the psychiatric assistant residents. The importance of family- 
social influences is stressed. Several students can elect to have psychosomatic 
medicine as their main focus, while others spend their clerkship time at the 
Spring Grove State Hospital. 

PSY 104. Advanced Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship. 

(Fourth year — 4 weeks). (Dr. Gross, Dr. Rafferty, and Staff) 

A clinical clerkship is offered in the outpatient clinics of the Psychiatric Institute 
for one month. The students elect either the adult or children's programs. 
Emphasis is on the clinical management, diagnosis, interviewing technique, and 
psychotherapy. Related theoretical seminars and intensive personal supervision 
provide support to the clinical experience. 

RADIOLOGY 

Professors: Dennis (head of department) and Davidson. 
Associate Professors: Hearn, Knox, Lyon and Robinson. 
Assistant Professors: Reiss, Seydel and Wizenberg. 
Instructors: Allen, Hyman, Navarro, Thomas, Threatt and Wallop. 

RAD 101. Radiologic Anatomy. (12) 

First year, first semester. A correlated course is given in conjunction with the 
Department of Anatomy. This course consists of nine lecture-demonstrations 
devoted to the skull, chest, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, the spine, 
and joints. Not only is the normal anatomy shown, but the radiologic aspects 
of a few pathologic processes are also shown for emphasis and correlation. 

RAD 103. Radiation Therapy Orientation. (5) 

Third year This series of five lectures is given to the whole third year class 
to present the basis of radiation therapy. In the first lecture, the basic principles 



University of Maryland • 109 

of radiotherapy and the present and future role of radiotherapy of malignant 
tumors is presented. The second lecture is devoted to the principles of radio- 
biology, radiophysics and radiation protection. The last three lectures deal 
with groups of tumors that are curable with ionizing radiation with a discussion 
of the principle indications, management and results of radiotherapy in each 
of these groups. 

RAD 104. Radiologic Orientation I. (33) 

Third year. A series of lecture-demonstrations are given to small groups of 
students at the Baltimore City Hospital, Mercy Hospital, and the University 
Hospital. An attempt is made to cover the roentgen studies of all systems of 
the body with demonstrations of the more common lesions encountered in 
each system. At Baltimore City Hospital, twelve lecture-demonstrations are 
given on the chest, the genitourinary tract and metabolic bone diseases, while 
at Mercy Hospital, three hours are devoted to the arthritides and bone tumors. 
At the University Hospital, eighteen additional lecture-demonstrations are 
devoted to the lungs, gastrointestional tract, heart, and skull. 

RAD 105. Radiologic Orientation II. (60) 

Fourth year. Students in groups of five are assigned full time for a period of 
two weeks to the Diagnostic Division of the Department of Radiology. On 
alternate mornings, a student observes chest and gastrointestinal fluoroscopy, 
interviews outpatients and correlates the clinical and roentgen findings on these 
patients and attends film reading sessions with the staff radiologists. The stu- 
dents are taught the basic principles of fluoroscopy and are assigned a few 
patients with pulmonary and cardiac lesions to fluoroscope. Recommended 
reading assignments are made and the students spend the afternoons stud\ing 
a select group of teaching cases which are correlated with these reading as- 
signments. Daily diagnostic conferences are held with the students, and at 
this time the interesting cases of the day are presented. They also attend 
joint conferences held with the department of Pediatrics, and the Division 
of General and Thoracic Surgery. 

SURGERY 

Professors: Buxton (head of department), Arnold, Austin, Blanchard, 

Cowley, Hull, Mansberger, Yeager and Young. 
Associate Professors: Adams, Attar, Flotte, Galleher, Hubbard, Morgan, 

MOSBERG, SCHIRMER, SCHMEISSER, STEENBURG AND THOMPSON. 

Assistant Professors: Bowie, Campbell, Fletcher, Govatos, Johnson, Mays, 
Mech, Ollodart, Siwinski, Walder and Staff. 

SURG 101A. Surgical Specialty Lectures. (42) 

Third year. This is a series of lectures wherein the surgical discussions center 
around the problems of Otorhinolaryngology, Thoracic Surgery, Neurosurgery, 
Orthopedic Surgery, and Urologic Surgery. 

SURG 103. Outpatient Clerkship in Surgery. (286) 

Third year. One-fourth of the third year class is assigned to the Department 
of Surgery each quarter of the school year. Students are assigned to the Out- 
patient Department for the examination and supervised care of patients in 
the General Surgical, Orthopedic, Urologic, and ENT Clinics. One-third of 
this quarter is spent at Mercy Hospital or Baltimore City Hospitals. On this 
latter rotation experiences are offered in Orthopedic Surgery. ENT and 
Urology. Whereas for Mercy Hospital rotation these are at University 
Hospital. Students are assigned in rotation as clinical clerks at night in the 
Emergency Room. 



110 • School of Medicine 



SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS 



Fellowships are available each summer for a period of ten weeks in the 
Surgical Research Laboratory. Both sophomore and junior students are eligible. 
Investigative problems related to these services will be undertaken under the 
guidance of members of the Surgical Staff, and under the direct supervision 
of Associate Professor Mansberger. 

DIVISION OF GENERAL SURGERY 

Doctors: Adam:, Bowie, Buxton, Flotte, Govatos, Hubbard, Hull, 
Johnson, Mansberger, Ollodart, Siwinski, Steemburg, Stewart, 
Walder, Yeager and Staff. 

SURG 103A 

This is the student's introduction to an office-type surgical practice in that 
he undertakes the supervised care of patients in the Surgical Dispensary. Gen- 
eral discussions related to problems presented by these patients are given by 
the Surgical Staff. The introduction to specific surgical techniques in exami- 
nation and treatment of patients is undertaken. This course is given at both 
University and Mercy Hospitals, and Baltimore City Hospitals. Students are 
assigned to the Emergency Room during this period. 

SURG 104A. 

Senior students are assigned to patients on the surgical wards in the University 
Hospital and at Maryland General Hospital. They are responsible for the 
physical examination, history, and certain laboratory tests as required by the 
patient's disease. They participate in the active care and treatment of patients. 
Rounds are held daily by attending staff and frequent student conferences 
are conducted. 

DIVISION OF NEUROSURGERY 

Doctors: Arnold, Thompson and Staff. 

SURG 104B. 

Senior students assigned to this division act in the capacity of student interns. 
The students are closely integrated with the House Staff and are assigned 
sufficient patients so that comprehensive experience in the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of neurosurgical problems is obtained. Instruction is through ward 
rounds and informal discussions. Wednesday mornings are devoted to clinical, 
x-ray, and neuropathologic conferences. 

DIVISION OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Doctors: Austin (head of division), T. Morgan, R. Lapidario, Schmeisser, 
Tansey and Staff. 

SURG 103C. 

Junior students are assigned to this division in the Outpatient Department at 
University Hospital, Baltimore City Hospitals, and Mercy Hospital. Patients 
are seen for diagnosis and postoperative care. Instruction is given in the 
application of plaster casts and in the ambulatory management of orthopedic 
problems. Occasion is given to instruction in the Physical Therapy of patients 
with orthopedic disease. 



University of Maryland • 111 

SURG 104C. 

Senior students are assigned patients both on the surgical ward? and in the 
Emergency Room. They participate in the care of these patients, and are 
given instruction in the application of traction and plaster casts. Frequent 
ward rounds are held at the Kernan Hospital for Crippled Children. An 
Amputee Training program is active. 

DIVISION OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY 

Doctors: Blanchard (head of division), Engnoth, Fletcher, Hammond, 
Natale, O'Rourk, Stram and Staff. 

Mercy Hospital: Drs. Gerlach and Isaacs. 

SURG 103E. 

In a series of six periods of four hours, in the Outpatient Otolaryngology 
Clinic, junior students are individually instructed in the techniques of the 
examination of the ears, nose, and throat. One hour of basic audiological 
technique is presented to each group by an audiologist, one hour of intro- 
ductory speech pathology is presented by a speech pathologist. 

SURG 104E. 

An advanced period of elective study with emphasis on diagnosis and treat- 
ment is available to approximately one-fifth of the senior class students each 
year as an alternate elective surgical specialty for one month's duration. In 
the Outpatient Department diagnostic problems are presented at conferences 
with the staff department head twice each week and thoroughly reviewed in 
the light of current practice. Two sessions each week are available to the 
student to assist in the operating room and two sessions each week are avail- 
able in the bronchoesophagology clinic. Each student is responsible for eve- 
ning emergency calls on Ear, Nose, and Throat and examination of the pa- 
tients admitted on the service. Daily ward rounds are carried out with the 
students. 

DIVISION OF THORACIC SURGERY 

Doctors: Cowley (head of division), Attar, McLaughlin, Miller and 
Staff. 

SURG 104F. 

Senior students participate in the care of these patients in the operating rooms 
and on the wards of University, Mercy and Mt. Wilson Hospitals. In addi- 
tion, they receive instruction in diagnostic bronchoscopy, esophagoscopy, 
cardiac catheterization, angiocardiography, and pulmonary functions studies. 

DIVISION OF UROLOGIC SURGERY 

Doctors: Young (head of division), Campbell, Galleher, Mays, Schirmer 
and Staff. 

SURG 103D. 

Instruction is given to junior students in this division on the diagnosis of 
urologic disease of both men and women. The general aspects of instrumen- 
tation are discussed and the roentgenologic evidence of urologic disease is 
emphasized. One section of these students receive their instruction at Balti- 
more City Hospitals. 

SURG 104D. 

Students are assigned patients in the University Hospital wards. Further 
instruction is given in diagnosis and instrumentation of these patients and 
in the x-ray diagnosis of urologic disease. 



Continuing Education Courses 

THE COMMITTEE ON CONTINUING 
MEDICAL EDUCATION 

E. T. Lisansky, M.D., Chairman and Director 
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll, Executive Secretary 
John H. Moxley, III, m.d., Dean, Ex Officio 
George H. Yeager, m.d., Director of Hospital, Ex Officio 
Raymond L. Clemmens, m.d. Erland Nelson, m.d. 

Thomas B. Connor, m.d. Howard F. Raskin, m.d. 

Virginia Huffer, m.d. Leonard Scherlis, m.d. 

Arlie R. Mansberger, Jr., m.d. William L. Stewart, m.d. 

Edmund B. Middleton, m.d. Theodore E. Woodward, m.d. 

In an effort to assist the practicing physician to keep abreast of the newer 
developments in the science and practice of medicine, the Continuing Medical 
Education Committee continues to offer courses in a variety of subjects. At this 
writing, it is planned to present on our campus, courses as follows: 

COURSE DURATION 

Advances in Medical Science 2 hrs./day, 1 day/week, 12 weeks 

Basic Electrocardiography 1 day 

Clinical Anatomy 3 hrs./day, 2 days/week, 15 weeks 

Clinical Cardiology 1 day 

Dermatology 1 day 

Diabetes 1 day 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat 1 day 

Family Counseling 3 days 

Gynecology 1 day 

Hematology 1 day 

Infectious Diseases 4 days (In association with 

American College of Physicians) 

*In-Service 1-4 weeks 

Dermatology, For In Tg. cr 4 days (In association with 

American College of Physicians) 

Neuropathology for Pathologists .... 5 days 

Obstetrics 1 day 

Psychiatry for Internists 5 days (In association with 

American College of Physicians) 

Surgical Physiology 1 day 

♦VISITING TRAINEESHIP IN-SERVICE PROGRAM 

Various departments and sub-divisions of the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine are open to interested physicians through a Visiting Traineeship 

112 






University of Maryland • 113 

In-Service Program" designed to expose the practicing physician to the most 
current concepts in the practice of medicine, surgery and their various 
specialties. 

This program is highly flexible and designed for each enrollee individually. 
The enrolled physician will participate in the department's routine scheduled 
program of Rounds, Clinics and Conferences. No alteration in the department 
routine will be made to formalize the program into a specific postgraduate 
course. The enrollee will, however, be the guest of the division or department 
with which he affiliates. Ample allowance of time be made for collateral read- 
ing in the privacy of the library and for attendance at Chief of Service Rounds, 
Resident Rounds and Grand Rounds, if desired. 

Each program is individually designed where possible. Such programs are 
formulated after a personal interview with the Director, or Assistant Director, 
of the Committee on Continuing Medical Education, and the Department or 
Division Head under whose supervision the trainee or enrollee will work. 
However, if a personal interview is inconvenient because of geographical dis- 
tance, applications will be considered by appropriate correspondence. 

The Visiting Traineeship In-Service Program allows for cross-disciplinary 
visiting, or the entire period may be allocated to one specific subject or medical 
problem. This program, therefore, offers a variety of possibilities that may 
allow a profitable and rewarding experience. 

Inasmuch as this catalog material is being prepared in 1968 and is intended 
to cover activities through 1971, it is possible that new courses may be devised 
and others deleted during the intervening period. Please contact the Continuing 
Education Committee of the University of Maryland School of Medicine for 
further information regarding postgraduate courses. 



Department of Physical Therapy 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



University of Maryland • 115 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 



The Department of Physical Therapy of the School of Medicine administers 
a 4 year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree. The curriculum 
consists of 139 semester hour credits: 63 in liberal arts and sciences, 4 in health 
and physical activities and 72 in professional courses. The freshmen and sopho- 
more students are registered on the College Park or Baltimore County Campus 
and the junior and senior students on the Baltimore City Campus. Qualified 
students from other accredited universities or colleges who have successfully 
completed appropriate courses may be admitted directly to the professional 
program at Baltimore. 

The educational program is accredited by the Council on Medical Education 
of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Physi- 
cal Therapy Association. 

For detailed information refer to the BULLETIN issued by the Department 
of Physical Therapy. This can be obtained by writing to the Department of 
Physical Therapy, School of Medicine, 520R West Lombard Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. 



FACULTY 

LATIMER, Ruth M., Associate Professor and Head of the Department; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Richmond, 1945; C.P.T., U.S. Army Hospital, 1946; M.S., Medical 

College of Virginia, 1952. 
BUCA, Josephine T., Assistant Professor; B.S., Loyola University, 1949; C.P.T., 

University of Texas, 1947; M.A., University of Maryland, 1967. 
GLICKMAN, Leslie, Instructor; B.S. & C.P.T., University of Maryland, 1964. 
GLIDDEN, Dorothy, Instructor; B.S., University of Wisconsin. 1942; C.P.T., U.S. 

Army Medical School, 1945; M.P.H., University of North Carolina, 1965. 
KARPELES, Leo, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of North Carolina, 1941: 

M.D., University of Washington, 1955. 
KENDALL, Florence, Lecturer; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; C.P.T., 

Walter Reed General Hospital, 1932. 
LENN, Kaye, Instructor; B.A., Montana State University, 1951; C.P.T., Medical 

College of Virginia, 1952. 
NOVELL, Joan, Instructor; B.S., University of Connecticut (major in Physical 

Therapy), 1955. 
PAISLEY, Kenneth, Instructor; B.S., Bloomsburg State College, Pa., 1957; C.P.T., 

University of Pennsylvania, 1958; M.P.H., University of North Carolina, 1966; 

M.S., University of Scranton, Pa., 1967. 
PAYTON, Otto, Instructor; (Dept. of Preventive Medicine & Rehabilitation); 

B.S. & C.P.T., University of Kansas, 1956; M.S., Ed., University of Indiana. 

1964. 
PFEIFFER, Boyd, Instructor; B.A., Gettysburg College, 1960. 
SHOTTER, Lillian. Assistant Professor; B.S.. Madison College, Va., 1933; C.P.T., 

New York University, 1935; M.A., Columbia University, 1950. 
SNYDER, Joel, Assistant; B.S., University of Maryland, 1964. 

Members of other departments of the Medical and Nursing Schools present 
the medical, surgical and nursing lectures assisted by the faculty of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Therapy. 

Clinical education is conducted at the University of Maryland Hospital and 
other clinical affiliations by the academic and clincal faculty. 



116 • School of Medicine 

PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS 

Course Title first second 

ENG 1 — Composition 3 

PHIL 1 — Introduction to Philosophy (or course in Fine Arts) . . 3 

SPEECH 1— Public Speaking 3 

CHEM 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

MATH 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 3 

SOC 1 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

PSYC 1— Introduction to Psychology 3 

PT 10, 1 1 — Physical Therapy Orientation 1 1 

Academic Hours 14 17 

PE — Physical Activities 1 1 

HLTH 5— Science & Theory of Health 2 

Total Hours 17 18 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ENG 3, 4— World Literature 3 3 

PHYS 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

ZOOL 1— General Zoology 4 

ZOOL 2— The Animal Phyla 4 

PSYC — Choice of 2 psychology courses 3 3 

HIST 21 or 22— History of the U.S 3 

HIST 41 or 42— Western Civilization 3 

Total Hours 17 17 

For course description refer to the Bulletins of the Colleges of Arts and 
Sciences or Physical Education, Recreation and Health, as appropriate. 

Students transferring from a regionally accredited college for admission to the 
junior year must have completed 65 academic semester hour credits of courses 
comparable to those listed above with 2 S.H.C. of substitution for P.T. 10, 11 and 
a year of physical education and health (4 S.H.C). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

SEMESTER credit hours 

Course Title first second 

ANAT 101, 102— Human Anatomy 5 5 

CM 101— Clinical Medicine I 2 

CM 102— Clinical Medicine II 2 

PATH 102— Pathology 3 

PHYSIOL 101— Human Psysiology 4 

PT 101— P.T. Theory & Practice I 3 

PT 102— P.T. Theory & Practice II 2 

PT 103— Rehabilitation I 1 

PT 104 — Nursing Procedures Related to Physical Therapy .... 1 

PT 105— Professional Orientation & Ethics 1 

PT 106 — Therapeutic Exercise I 2 

PT 107, 108— Clinical Education I, II 1 1 

Total Hours 17 16 



University of Maryland • 117 

SUMMER (6 weeks) 
PT 1 10— Clinical Education III 4 

SENIOR YEAR 

ANAT 151 — Biomechanics & Kinesiology 3 

CM 151, 152— Clinical Medicine III, IV 3 1 

PHYSIOL 151— Applied Physiology 2 

PT 151 — Evaluation Procedures 2 

PT 153 — Therapeutic Exercise II 3 

PT 154— Rehabilitation II 2 

PT 155— P.T. Theory & Practice III 3 

PT 156 — Public and Community Health 2 

PT 157— Clinical Education IV 1 

PT 158— Clinical Education V 6 

PT 160— Biostatistics & Research 3 

PT 162 — Current Literature 1 

PT 164 — Administration 1 



Total Hours 17 16 



Description of Courses 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Numbers in parentheses indicate semester hour credits and approximate 
clock hours. 

PT 10, 11. Physical Therapy Orientation. (1,1-32) 

General introductory course to the profession of physical therapy and the 
relationship to other health professions. Orientation of the student is done by 
visual aids, discussion and visits to physical therapy departments. 

ANAT 101, 102. Human Anatomy. (5,5-288) 

Prerequisites, zoology 8 hours. The student is given an opportunity to develop 
a basic concept of the morphology of the human body through a correlation of 
histology gross anatomy and neuroanatomy. Dissection of the human body, 
on a regional basis, including the brain is required. Three hours of lecture 
and six hours of laboratory a week. 

CM 101. Clinical Medicine I. (2-32) 

Prerequisites, psychology 9 hours. Lectures in psychiatry (22 hours) with 
special emphasis on psychosomatic disorders, personal and social factors affect- 
ing the handicapped and patient-therapist interactions. Lectures in dermatology 
(10 hours) including the anatomy and function of the skin, symptomatology, 
and treatment of skin diseases. 

CM 102. Clinical Medicine II. (2-32) 

Prerequisite, Physiol. 101. Continuation of CM. 101 with lectures in medicine 
to include the symptoms and treatment of patients with involvement of the 
pulmonary, cardiovascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, endocrine and re- 
productive systems. 

PATH 102. Pathology. (3-48) 

Prerequisites, Anat. 101 and Physiol. 101. This course includes the study of 
the basic principles of disease and injury with their application to the various 
systems of the body. An autopsy and pathological specimen are observed. 

PHYSIOL 101. Human Physiology. (4-112) 

Prerequisites, zoology 8 hours and chemistry 8 hours. The lectures cover the 
major fields of physiology, including the following areas: central and peripheral 
nervous systems, neuromuscular apparatus, heart and circulation, respiration, 
kidney and body fluids, gastro-intestinal tract, endocrines and reproduction. 
Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory and one hour conference 
a week. 

PT 101. Physical Therapy Theory and Practice I. (3-96) 
Manipulative Procedures (48 hours) 

Students are taught to investigate by means of palpation of topographical 
anatomy those areas responsible for restricting range of motion or inhibiting 

118 



University of Maryland • 119 

functional activity and to apply appropriate manipulative soft-tissue techniques 
to reduce pain, release contractures of muscles and scar tissue adhesions. The 
theory and physiological effects are discussed. One hour of lecture and two 
hours of laboratory a week. 
Hydrotherapy (48 hours) 

The physics of water and the principles of thermometry are reviewed. The 
physiological effects of local and general application of heat and cold on the 
human are studied both didactically and in the laboratory. Procedures which 
are taught include application of hot and cold packs, whirlpool, Hubbard tank, 
moist air, paraffin as well as principles and methods of underwater exercise. 
The therapeutic indications and limits of each of these procedures are stressed. 
One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory or clinical practice a week. 

PT 102. Physical Therapy Theory and Practice II. (2-4) 

Prerequisite, physics 8 hours. This course includes lectures and practice in 
the administration of infrared, ultraviolet, diathermy, microthermy and ultra- 
sonics. The physics and physiological effects are reviewed thereby enhancing 
the student's ability to make judgment in the therapeutic application of the 
procedures. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory or clinical 
practice a week. 

PT 103. Rehabilitation I. (1-32) 

A study of the basic philosophy underlying comprehensive care of the phy- 
sically handicapped, its principles and practices. The essential role of the 
physical therapist in the total treatment program is stressed. An introduction 
to functional training, ambulation and the application of assistive and sup- 
portive devices is included. One hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory 
or clinical practice a week. 

PT 104. Nursing Procedures Related to Physical Therapy. (1-32) 

This course, taught by a nurse and a physical therapist, is designed to cover 
the cooperative relationship between the two professions in patient care to in- 
clude supportive and aseptic bandaging, isolation procedures, oxygen therapy, 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation, drainage, first aid and vital signs. One hour 
of lecture and one hour of laboratory or cliinical observation a week. 

PT 105. Professional Orientation and Ethics. (1-16) 

A broad interpretation of the qualifications of a profession and a basic intro- 
duction to ethics is presented. The history and development of physical therapy 
as a profession is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the student's 
understanding of and development of professional and ethical behavior. 

PT 106. Therapeutic Exercise I. (2-64) 

This course covers the history and scope of therapeutic exercise, patterns of 
movement and posture (normal and abnormal) and a study of developmental 
and physiological principles of purposeful graded exercises for the prevention 
and treatment of physical disabilities. One hour of lecture and three hours 
of laboratory or clinical practice a week. 

PT 107, 108. Clinical Education I, II. (2-96) 

Clinical observation and experience in patient care with emphasis on utilizing 
the procedures concurrently learned in other courses. Three hours a week. 

PT 110. Clinical Education III. (4-210) 

A continuation of P.T. 108. The student has the opportunity to become more 
proficient in applying to patients the procedures learned in the first year and 
to observe other procedures to be learned in the second year. The student 
has six weeks of full-time (approximately 35 hours a week) clinical experi- 
ence, spending three weeks at two different hospitals or agencies. 



120 • School of Medicine 

ANAT 151. Biomechanics and Kinesiology. (3-96) 

Prerequisites, Physics 8 hours, Anat. 101, 102. A detailed study of motion in 
the human body with emphasis on its mechanical and functional aspects. It 
is designed to include observation and analysis of movement as it occurs in 
man under both normal and pathological conditions. Two hours of lecture 
and four hours of laboratory a week. 

CM 151, 152. Clinical Medicine III, IV. (3,1-64) 

A continuation of CM. 102, with 16 hours of lecture in each of the special- 
ities — surgery, pediatrics, neurology and orthopedics. The symptoms and treat- 
ment of patients with conditions most frequently referred to the physical 
therapists are stressed. 

PHYSIOL 151. Applied Physiology. (2-48) 

Prerequisite, Physiol. 101. A study of physiology as it applies to exercise and 
its effects on the various systems, especially the cardio-pulmonary and neuro- 
muscular, in normal and pathological conditions. One hour of lecture and 
two hours of laboratory a week. 

PT 151. Evaluation Procedures. (2-64) 

The principles, techniques and interpretation of those testing procedures within 
the scope of the physical therapist are taught by discussion and practice with 
normal and abnormal individuals. These evaluations include manual and 
functional muscle tests; goniometric, girth and length measurements; postural 
analyses and tests of endurance and coordination and sensory acuity. One 
hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory or clinical practice a week. 

PT 153. Therapeutic Exercise II. (3-96) 

The course, in continuation of P.T. 106, is designed to help the student develop 
skill in the correlation and application of the neurophysiological principles in- 
volved in the prevention and treatment of physical disabilities as well as to 
develop skill in planning, teaching and writing programs of exercise. Two 
hours lecture and four hours of laboratory or clinical practice a week. 

PT 154. Rehabilitation II. (2-48) 

A continuation of P.T. 103. Emphasis is placed on the multi-discipline ap- 
proach to the special problems of the severely handicapped, such as patients 
with amputations and spinal cord lesions. Orthotics and prosthetics are studied 
including pre- and post-prosthetic evaluation and treatment. Two hours of 
lecture and four hours of laboratory or clinical practice a week for eight 
weeks. (Third quarter). 

PT 155. Physicial Therapy and Practice III. (3-96) 

This course includes the physics and the physiological effects of low frequency 
alternating and direct currents as applied percutaneously for therapeutic and 
diagnostic use. Electromyography and nerve conduction time are included. 
Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory or clinical practice a week. 

PT 156. Public and Community Health. (2-32) 

The principles and methods of public health, including use of public health 
statistics, epidemiology, enviironmental health, community health organization 
and community health planning based on chronic disease epidemiology, are 
studied. The student has the opportunity to study other health related pro- 
fessions as well as social and health agencies to make him better able to con- 
tribute to comprehensive health care. Four hours of lecture a week for eight 
weeks. (Third quarter). 

PT 157. Clinical Education IV. (1-48) 

A continuation of P.T. 110, offering clinical experience in hospitals or with 
agencies utilizing advanced physical therapy procedures — especially those being 
taught in concurrent courses. Three hours a week. 



University of Maryland • 121 

PT 158. Clinical Education V. (6-376) 

A continuation of P.T. 157. The students is given increased responsibility for 
patient evaluation, planning the treatment program and administration of phy- 
sical therapy; thereby integrating all procedures for comprehensive patient 
care. For the first eight weeks (third quarter) 12 hours a week; for the second 
eight weeks (fourth quarter) full-time or approximately 35 hours a week. The 
student will spend four weeks with each of two different hospitals or agencies. 

PT 160. BlOSTATISTICS AND RESEARCH. (3-48) 

Prerequisite, mathematics 6 hours. A course designed to acquaint the student 
with the need for research in clinical physical therapy with an introduction 
to research design, mathematical tools and instrumentation. Each student 
will be expected to participate in a research project during the last semester. 
One hour of lecture and five hours of laboratory for eight weeks. (Third 
quarter). 

PT 162. Current Literature. (1-16) 

A course designed to assist the student in evaluating and abstracting current 
scientific literature in a selected area. Oral, visual and written communications 
are used for presentation. Two hours a week for eight weeks. (Third quarter). 

PT 164. Administration. (1-16) 

Students are given an opportunity to become acquainted with administration 
and supervision as it applies to the physical therapist. Human (interpersonal 
relations); intellectual (laws, methods and principles) and material factors 
(buildings, grounds, equipment) are discussed. Students are given an oppor- 
tunity to practice written and oral communications, analyze and describe the 
duties of a physical therapist, write policies for a department and plan a phy- 
sical therapy department. Two hours a week for eight weeks. (Third quarter). 



Endowment Fund for 
The Medical School 



The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

Wetherbee Fort, m.d., President Harry Clifton Byrd 

Austin C. Diggs H. Vernon Eney 

Everett S. Diggs, m.d. Frederic M. Hewitt 

E. Robert Kent George H. Yeager, m.d. 
James R. Karns, m.d., Secy.-Treas. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its legal title 
being The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland," 
and is independent and self-perpetuating. Except as may be otherwise directed 
by the donor with respect to particular funds, the powers of the Trustees are 
limited to the expenditure of the interest or income derived from the various 
funds or donations which are applied as directed by the donors for the benefit of 
the University. They may be made to the general or University Fund, to the 
Medical Fund or to any other department of the University. If intended for the 
School of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some 
special object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes 
of the donor will be strictly regarded. Checks should be made payable to The 
Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland, and sent to Dr. 
James R. Karns, 800 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the law of the State 
of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Medicine 



(Here state amount or describe property) 



122 



Medical School Alumni Association 

OFFICERS FOR 1968-1969 

Dr. Lewis P. Gundry, President 

Dr. Wilfred H. . Townshend, Jr., President-Elect 

Dr. John C. Hamrick, Vice-President 

Dr. Herbert Berger, Vice-President 

Dr. C. Martin Rhode, Vice-President 

Dr. Theodore Kardash, Secretary 

Dr. Robert B. Goldstein, Treasurer 

Dr. William H. Triplett, Executive Director 

Mr. Wm. B. Girkin, Executive Secretary 

Members of the Board of Directors 

Dr. W. Kenneth Mansfield 

Dr. John C. Dumler 

Dr. Alfred A. Garrison 

Dr. James R. Karns 

Dr. Arlie R. Mansberger 

Dr. Martin E. Strobel 

Dr. Henry H. Startzman 

Dr. Kyle Y. Swisher 

Dr. Howard B. Mays, Ex-officio 

Dr. John O. Sharrett, Ex-officio 

Nominating Committee 

Dr. Howard B. Mays, Ex-officio 
Dr. John O. Sharrett, Ex-officio 
Dr. Theodore Stacy 
Dr. J. Howard Franz 
Dr. Gibson J. Wells 

Representatives to General Alumni Council 

Dr. Martin E. Strobel Alternates Dr. Kyle Y. Swisher 

Dr. William H. Triplett Dr. Alfred A. Garrison 

Dr. Robert B. Goldstein Dr. Lewis P. Gundry 

Representatives to Editorial Board, Bulletin 
Dr. Lester A. Wall Dr. Arlie R. Mansberger Dr. John D. Gelin 

Representatives to Faculty Board 
Dr. Arlie R. Mansberger Dr. Edward F. Cotter 

123 



Faculty Index of the Medical School 



A 

Abeles, A. L 47 

Abeshouse, G. A 75 

Abrams, R. C 75 

Acton, C. B 49 

Adams, E 47 

Adams, G. K 46 

Adams, J. E 61 

Adams, T. R 75 

Adelman, W. J., Jr 66 

Agapitos, G. N 49 

Aimone, A 47 

Ainsworth, L. H 68 

Albright, M. J 68 

Alderman, G. C 75 

Alevizatos, A. C 49 

Amces, I. G 58 

Anderson, A. R 68 

Anderson, A. W 49 

Andrese, A. P 58 

Andres, R 49 

Andrews, L. P 49 

Anthony, R. L 48 

Antlitz, A. M 49 

Aposhian, H. V 48 

Arnold, J. G., Jr 75 

Asher, E 68 

Ashman, L 49 

Aslam-Khan, M 48 

Atkins, J. L 50 

Attar, S 76 

Ault, V. L 62 

Austin, G. N 76 

Awad, M. Z 68 

Ayuyao, G. P 62 

Aziz, M. A 48 

B 

Baca, M 58 

Bacharach, D 50 

Badie, D 62 

Baitch, A 76 

Baker, J. T 58 

Baker, R. H 48 

Baldwin, R. W 63 

Balis, G 68 

Ballard, M. B 45, 59 

Balsam, F. J 66 



Baltazar, R. P 63 

Barnett, H. C 48 

Barnett, R. M 59 

Barraclough, C. A 66 

Barrett, C. P 45, 46 

Barrett, H. V 66 

Barry, C 48 

Bartemeier, L. H 68 

Barth, W. F 50 

Bauerschub, G. M., Jr 63 

Baum, M 68 

Beacham, E. G 50 

Beck, H. M 59 

Becker, R. E 68 

Beeby, J. L 80 

Begum, F 48 

Belcher, H. V 76 

Bell, F. K 48 

Bereston, E. S 50 

Bergmann, H 62 

Bernstein, H. N 60 

Berry, R. Z 76 

Besson, E. H 63 

Bessman, S. P 47 

Bianco, E. A 50 

Biehl, H. P 76 

Biggs, R. D 57 

Blake, W. D 66 

Blanchard, C. L 76 

Blass, T 68 

Blazek, C. J 50 

Blide, R. M 50 

Blum, L. V 50 

Blumberg, D 68 

Bluth, H 68 

Boaz, T. D 60 

Boccuti, A. R 46 

Bode, V. C 47 

Borges, F. J 50 

Boslow, H 68 

Bowden, G. R 48 

Bowen, C 68 

Bowie, H. C 76 

Bradford, N. H 68 

Bradley, J. E 45, 63 

Brager, S. H 50 

Brantigan, O. C 45, 76 

Braver, D. A 60 

Brenner, A 63 



125 



126 



School of Medicine 



Briele, H. A 76 

Brody, E. B 68 

Brown, A 66 

Brown, A. V 47 

Brown, G. P 69 

Brown, N. C 48 

Brown, R 69 

Bryan, V 58 

Buca. J. T 114 

Bulmash, M. H 45, 46 

Bundick, W. R 50 

Burgin, B 50 

Burkart, T. J 61 

Burkle, J. H 50 

Burnett, J. W 50 

Burns, H. B 76 

Burns, J. P., Jr 48 

Burt, R 69 

Buxton, R. W 75 

Byerly, M. P 50 

Byrd, D. M., Ill 48 

C 

Cader, G 50 

Campbell, E. W., Jr 76 

Canner, P. L 48 

Caplan, L. H 63 

Cappon, D 69 

Carozza, F. A., Jr 48, 50 

Callol, D. G 50 

Carson, J. E 69 

Cascorbi, H. F 46 

Cavonius, C. R 60 

Cerino, M. T 76 

Chacko, R 69 

Chang, Y. F 47 

Chapman, M. J 76 

Charache, P 50 

Chou, T. H 47 

Christensen, O. D 59 

Church, G 50 

Cicci, R. L 69, 76 

Clark, F. A., Jr 76 

Clemmens, R. L 63, 69 

Clower, C. G 69 

Clyde, D. F 48 

Cockey, T. B 75 

Cohen, B. S 50, 66 

Cohen, G. M 69 

Cohen, H 59 

Cohen, J. H 50 

Cohen, M. L 57 

Cohn, J. V 69 

Connor, H. E„ Jr 69 

Connore, T. B 50 

Cook, E. E„ Jr 50 



Coplan, R. S 59 

Cordi, J. M 63 

Cornblath, M 62 

Cornbrooks, E. I., Jr 59 

Cotter, E. F 50 

Cowen, J. R 69 

Cowley, R. A 76 

Cranley, R. E 61 

Creamer, J. J 60 

Croce, G. C 69 

Crosby, R. M. N 63, 76 

Cross, E., Jr 50 

Cross, R. J 76 

Crauch, P. A 48 

Cunningham, R. M 76 

D 

Davidson, C. N 75 

Davis, G. H 59 

Davis, J. R 50 

Davis, M. H 51 

Davis, N. M 69 

Davis, R. E 69 

Dean, G. E 63 

Dear, W. A 57 

Del Rosario, R. S 46 

Dembo, D. H 51 

Dennis, J. M 75 

Derbin, J. P 69 

Derbyshire, R. L 69 

Devincentis, M. L 76 

DeWeer, P. J 47 

Diamond, L. S 76 

Diaz, A 51 

Diener, R. L 59 

Diggs, E. S 59 

Dixon, D. M 59 

Dodd, W. A 59 

Donahoe, K 69 

Donati, E. J 45 

Donnelly, M. J 49 

Donner, L 69 

Dorset, D. L 47 

Dowling, A. S 67 

Dudley, W. C 51 

Duke, J 67 

Dumler, J. C 59 

Dunnigan, W. C 76 

DePraw, E. J., Jr 48 

Durkan, J. P 59 

Duvall, R. G 51 

Dwyer, F. P., Jr 76 

E 

Eastland, J. S 51 

Eberling, W. C, III 51 

Eby, D., Sr 47 



University of Maryland • 127 



Ehrlich, D 59 

Eichler, M 69 

Einberg, E 69 

Ellinger, G. F 51 

Ellis, F. A 51 

Elsmore, T. A 48 

Elwood, L 67 

Engnoth, M. L 76 

Entwisle, G 51, 66 

Esmond, W. C 51, 76 

Evans, R. L 51 

Eylar, O. R 57 

F 

Fabrikant, LB 57 

Failace, L. A 69 

Fajer, A. B 66 

Farinhold, L. W 69 

Fassett, D 69 

Feinberg, G. N 60 

Feldman, M„ Jr 51 

Fernandez, A. C 51 

Ferrari, M. B 61 

Fiedler, K. R 70 

Figge, F. H. J 45 

Findley, J. D 70 

Fineman. J 63 

Finkelstein, A. H 63 

Finlay, T. H 47 

Finn, R. B 70 

Fiocco, F 51 

Firminger, H. 1 61 

Fiset, L. G 51 

Fiset, P 57 

Fisher, R. S 61 

Fitspatrick, V. D., Jr 59 

Fitzpatrick, W. N 70 

Fleischer, C. J 67 

Fletcher, M. M 76 

Flotte, C. T 77 

Flynn, P. D 51 

Ford, R 70 

Foster, G. W 70 

Fox, S. L 60 

Frank, L. H 47 

Freeman, 1 51 

Freimuth, H. C 61 

Freinek, W. R 70 

Friedman, M 51 

Friedenberg, R 70 

! Funk, A 51 

Furnary, J. C 51 

G 

! Gallaher, LP 59 

Galleher, E. P 77 



Gakenheimer, W. A 51 

Garcia, R 59 

Gareis, L. C 59 

Garlick, W. L 77 

Gaskel, J. H 77 

Gavin, G. A 70 

Geduldig, D. S 47 

Gelpi, LA 70 

George, P 67 

Gerlach, J.J 77 

Gessner, J. E 67 

Glaser, E. M 66 

Glaser, K. 63, 70 

Glassman, L 46 

Glick, G. M 46 

Glick, S. S 63 

Glickman, L 114 

Glidden, D 114 

Gold, M. 1 46 

Goldberg, J. R 60 

Goldiamond, 1 70 

Goldman, L 66 

Goldmann, H 70 

Goldstein, A 47 

Goldstein, M 51 

Goldstein, R. B 77 

Gonzalez, C. E 51 

Gonzalez, L. E 51 

Goodman, E 70 

Goodman, H 63 

Gordon, B. S 70 

Gorten, M. K 63 

Gorwitz, K 70 

Goshorn, G 63 

Govatos, G 77 

Grant, J. A 63 

Gray, S. H 70 

Green, R. M 63 

Greenberg, M. G 63 

Greenstein, G. H 77 

Greisman, S. E 51, 66 

Grenwell, R. G 70 

Grenzer, W. H 51 

Griffin, R 70 

Gross, A 70 

Gross, G. M 70 

Gross, H. S 70 

Gross, M 70 

Gryder, R. M 47 

Guerin, P. F 61 

Gundry, L. P 51 

Gutberlet, R. L 63 

Gutches, G. A 70 

Guyther, J. R 51 



128 



School of Medicine 



H 

Hachtel, F. W 45, 57 

Hage, M.J... 70 

Haider, R 52 

Hain, D. R 71 

Haines, J. S 77 

Hall, W. M 59 

Hamberry, L. G 77 

Hamell, A. Z 61 

Hamilton, J 71 

Hammond, A. F., Jr 77 

Hanashire, P. K 77 

Hankin, S. J 52 

Harmon, L. E 52 

Harris, W. M 71 

Harrison, D. P 47 

Hartz, J 71 

Haskins, A. L 58 

Hawkins, J. E 52 

Hawthorne, I. H 80 

Hayleck, M. L 63 

Heackock, A. H 47 

Hearn, J. B 45, 75 

Hebb, D. B 77 

Hebel, J. R 67 

Heck, A. F 58 

Hecker, W. A 63 

Heiner, G. G 49 

Heiner, J. D 49 

Heinz, E. C 49 

Heldeich, F. J., Jr 63 

Helfrich, R. F 77 

Helfrich. W. G 52 

Hellman, L. P 67 

Helrich, M 46 

Henderson, CM 77 

Henderson, M. M 67 

Hendrickson, G 61 

Hendry, M. H 67 

Hepner, R 63 

Herrman, R. W 77 

Hersperger, W. C 52 

Hetherington, L. H 52 

Hicken, W. J 61 

Hick, S 71 

Hilger, T 77 

Hill. CD 59 

Hilz, R. L 61 

Hinton, D 47 

Hitchman, I. L 71 

Hobbs, A. S 47 

Hoffman, W. 1 61 

Holbrook, W. A 77 

Holden, W 71 

Holder, W. L 71 

Hollander, M. B 52 



Holljes, H. W. D 52 

Holthous, R. R 63 

Hooper, Z. V 52 

Hopps, H. C 61 

Hornick, R. B 52 

Howard, L. W 63 

Howell, C 64 

Howell, S 47 

Hubbard, T. B., Jr 77 

Hudson, B. W 64 

Huffer, V 71 

Hulfish, B 58, 71 

Hull, H. C 77 

Hunt, G 71 

Hybl, A 47 

Hyman, N. B 75 

I 

Imashuku, S 80 

Inayatullah, M 52 

Irwin, R. C 64 

Isaacs, B. H 77 



Jacobson, W 71 

Jacobson, M. W 52 

James, W. E 59 

Jantz, E 71 

Jarboe, P 71 

Jenci, J. D 45 

Jennings, F. L 45 

Jensen, P. J 64 

Jiji, R 52 

Johnson, R. H 77 

Johnston, D. F 71 

Jones, E. D 77 

Jurf, A. N 66 

K 

Kaiser, T. H 64, 71 

Kallins, E. S 52 

Kaltreider, D. F 59 

Kammer, W. H 52 

Kaplow, S 46 

Kappelman, M 64 

Kardash, T 59 

Karfgin, A 52 

Karfgin, W. E 52 

Karns, J. R 52 

Karpeles, L 114 

Karpeles, L. M 66 

Kasik, F. T., Jr 52 

Kassel, L. E 52 

Katzen, L. E 60 

Keller, M. L 46 

Kemick, LB 52 

Kemp, K. V 67 



University of Maryland • 129 



Kendall, F 114 

Kenny, T. J 64 

Kent, Y. V 46 

Keown, L. L 52 

Kerr, H. D 52 

Kessell, R. W. 1 57 

Kessler, I. 1 67 

Kiefer, L 61 

Kime, P. W 61 

King, J. D. B 52 

Kirby, W. H., Jr 80 

Kirkpatrick, C. N., Jr 52 

Kirtley, M. E 47 

Kitlowski, E. A 45 

Klein, D. F 64 

Klimt, C. R 49 

Kloor, M 71 

Kloss, M. G 71 

Knatterud, G. L 49 

Knickerbocker, D. E 64 

Kniffin, A. L 71 

Knoch, H. R 52 

Knox, G. S 75 

Kochman, L. A 52 

Kogan, L. L 60 

Koh, J 48 

Kohlhepp, P. A 60 

Kohlmeyer, W. A 71 

Kohn, J 71 

Koo, P 47 

Kopecky, W. J., Jr 47 

Koppani, Z. H. B 64 

Kraft, G 71 

Krahl, V. E 45 

Kramer, D. N 80 

Kramer, H. C 77 

Kramer, M 71 

Kramer, M. D 58 

Krantz, J. C., Jr 45 

Krause, L. A. M 52 

Krevans, J. R 53 

Krol, W. E 49 

Kronthal, A 61 

Kubie, L. S 71 

Kuehn, F. G 53 

Kuller, L. H 67 

Kurland, A 71 

L 

LaBrosse, E. H 47, 77, 80 

Lai, H 71 

Lamb, A. C 71 

Lancaster, R. G 53 

Landesmann, R. K 46 

Lang, R. C 64 

Langenfelder, H. E 77 



Lapidario, R. S 77 

Lasson, M. L 72 

Lasson, M. S 64 

Latimer, R. M 114 

Lavenstein, A. F 64 

LaVina, C. L 46 

Lavy, R. C 64 

Ldulum, D. B 48 

Leach, C. E 53 

Lebouvier, J. D 77 

Lee, Y. C 53 

Legum, S. E 53 

Lenn, K 114 

Lentz, G. A., Jr 64, 67 

Lerman, L. R 53 

Lerner, P. F 53 

Leslie, F. E 53 

Levin, H 61 

Levin, L. A 72 

Levin, M 53 

Levin, M. L 57 

Levin, N 59 

Levy, D. A 53 

Levy, K 53 

Levy, R 72 

Lewandowski, A. A 53 

Lewis, H. A 72 

Li, J 47 

Libonati, J. P 53 

Lindenberg, R 62 

Linhardt, E. G 45 

Linthicum, CM 53 

Lisansky, E. T 53, 72 

Lister, L 53 

Liteanu, M 46 

Liu, S. J 53 

Lloyd, D 72 

Logan, M 72 

London, R. L 64 

Long, W. B 78 

Lopez-Majano, V 53 

Love, J. W 78 

Love, W. S 45, 53 

Lovice, H 53 

Lubash, G. D 53 

Luddy, R. E 64 

Lurie, S 72 

Lyden, R. J 53 

Lynn, W. D 78 

Lyon, J. A., Jr 64, 75 

M 

Machen, J. W 64 

Mackie, J. B 72 

Magruder, W. W 72 

Maher, E. E 64 



130 • School of Medicine 



Mahoney, F. 1 67 

Maiden, N. C 64 

Mansberger, A. R., Jr 78 

Marek, C. B 59 

Marine. D. N 53 

Markush, R. E 67 

Martin, C. W 59 

Martin, H. B 72 

Martin, L. G 53 

Masaitis, C 80 

Masters, J. M 45, 53 

Matanoski, G. M 67 

Maxwell, A 72 

Maxwell, G. A 59 

Mayer, R. F 58 

Mays, H. B 78 

McAslan, T. C 46 

McCarthy, V. C 49 

McCrumb, F. R., Jr 49, 53, 57 

McCue, C 72 

McCulloh, D 72 

McElroy, E 72 

McElwain, H. B 78 

McFadden, R. B 45 

McGinn, E. B 64 

McLaughlin, J. S 78 

McLean, G 53 

McNally, H. B 59 

McNelis, D. P 72 

McQueen, J 72 

Mead, J 53 

Mech, K. F 45, 78 

Meinert, C. L 49 

Meisels, A. A 61 

Mendonca, P. P 80 

Merkel, W. C 62 

Merlis, J. K 58, 66 

Merrill, G. G 53 

Michaelis, M 61 

Middlebrook, G 49 

Middleton, E. B 59 

Miller, J. E 78 

Miller, J. M 78 

Miller, N. L 64 

Miller, S 53 

Ming, P. M. L 62 

Ming, S. C 62 

Mintzer, D. W 54 

Misenhimer, H. R 59 

Modarressi, T. M 72 

Monroe, R. R 72 

Moore, K 78 

Morgan, T. H 78 

Morrison, S 54 

Morrison, T. H 54 

Mosberg, W. H., Jr 78 



Mosser, R. S 58, 64 

Moszlowski, E. F 59 

Mott, T 72 

Mould, L. L 60 

Mourat, S 72 

Mules, J. E 67 

Mullan, P. A 64 

Muller, S. E 54 

Mullins, L. J 47 

Munford, R. S 60 

Muse, J. E„ Jr 54 

Music, S. 1 57 

Musser, R. D 45 

Myers, J. A 54 

Myers, J. C 54 

Myers, W. F 57 

N 

Nabors, F 72 

Nair, P 64 

Nakazawa, M 72 

Nasdor, H. H 60 

Natale, R. D 78 

Navarro, R. N 46 

Neish, D. D„ Jr 54 

Nelson, E 58 

Nelson, J. W 78 

Niermann, W. A 64 

Nilsson, V 72 

Nishihare, M 48 

Nolan, J. J 54 

Norton, C 64 

Noshpitz, J 72 

Novak, T. M 67 

Novell, J 114 

Novey, R 72 

Novin, N 78 

O 

O'Donnell, J. J 72 

Oleynick, A. H 58, 73 

Oliver, M. L 46 

Ollodart, R. M 58, 88 

O'Mansky, B 64 

CTMansky, S. 1 54 

CTMorchoe, C. C. C 46 

O'Neill, J. J 48 

Oppenheimer, R 73 

O'Rourk, T. R., Jr 61 

Ortel, R. L 61 

Osterman, J. V., Jr 48 

Otenasek, F. J 78 

Oursler, D. A 54 

Owens, L. K 54 

Ozer, M 73 



University of Maryland 



131 



Pinter, G. G. 

Plasse, J. S 

Polley, E. H. 
Polachek, A. A. 

Pollack, S 

Pomerantz, S. H. 

Pope, A 

Pope, B 

Porter, H. P. 
Powder, J. R. 
Price, T. R 



80 
65 
114 
60 
47 



Padget, D. H. 
Padousis, R. P. 

Paisley, K 

Panayis, A. P. 

Pangborn, W. A. '*' 

Papadopoulos, C 

Parelhoff, M. E 4b 

Parker, R. T ^ 

Parker, W. S. 

Parr, J 

Passen, S 

Payton, O. 

Payton, O. D. 

Pearson, R. H. 

Pessagno, D. J. 

Petersen, K. W. 

Petrali, J. P. 

Pfeiffer, B ll * 

Pfeiffer, C. B. 

Phelan, P. C, Jr 

Phillips, F. E. . 

Pierpont, R. Z 



Raskin, J 5A 

Redding, J. S. . 
Reed, J. 
Reed, J. W 



54 
67, 73 



62 
62 

114 
67 
47 
78 
46 
46 



Reese, J. M 45 ' f 

Reimann, D. L °2 

Reiss, M. D 1: > 

Reiter, R. A ^4 

Remsberg, J. R. S ^4 

Rennels, M. L ^6 

Renner, I t5 

Reuber, M. D ^ 



54 



Revell, S. T. R., Jr 

Rever, W. B., Jr ™ 

60 



78 
73 

78 



Richards, R. D 

Richardson, A. D «? 

Richardson, P. F 

Rimer, B. A 

Rivera, A. M • 

Robertson, R. G 49 

Robinson, H. M., Jr 55 

Robinson, J. E ' 5 

Robinson, K. E 73 



68 
60 

65 

58 



Pijanowski, W. J ^ 

'*.'.'. 78 

46 



55 

65 
55 

73 
55 



54 
48 

47 
73 
73 
78 
78 
58 



54 



Queen, J. E 

Quinn, M. K 



Raab, K _ R 

Rabuzzi, D. D '° 

Rae-Grant, N '* 

Rafferty, F. T '* 

Raher, J '* 

Rahman, A. N D J] 

G. M. 
Ramsay 

Ramsay, R. • 

Randall, L. L 

Rasmussen, P 

Randol, C. L. 

Rapoport, M. I 

Rappeport, J 

Raskin, H. F 34 



Robinson, R. C. V 

Robinson, S. S 

Roig, R 

Romero, E 

Roop, D. J 

Rosell, L. A IZ 

Roseman, M 

Rosen, L. S 

Rosenzweig, E. C 

Rosin, J. D 

Ross, J 

Ross, W. M 

Rothfeld, B 

Rubacky, E. P 

Rubin, S 

Rudo, A. D 

Ruley, E. J 

Rusche, E 

Ryser, H. J. P 



47 
57 
79 

61 

75 



61 

55 
79 
65 
55 

48 



Ramapuram, U. m. 

Ramsay, F. J 

60 

62 
65 



Sabundayo, R. M 51 

Sack, L 1\ 

Saidel, B. H '/ 

Y 48 



Sakamoto 

Sakles, C. J. '* 

Salan, J " 

Samelson, L 

Sardana, I. 
Saunders, E. 
Saunders. O. H 
Savage, C. . 
Schamp, J. R- 



65 
55 

65 

73 
73 



132 • School of Medicine 



Scherlis, 1 79 

Scherlis, L 55, 65 

Scherlis, S 55, 65 

Schirmer, H. K. A 79 

Schleifer, C. B 73 

Schmeisser, G 79 

Schmuff, H 73 

Schnaper, N 73 

Schneider, J. C 47 

Schneider, M 73 

Schocket, S. S 61 

Schonfield, J 68, 73 

Schubart, A. F 55 

Schultz, R. B 61 

Schulz, C 74 

Schuster, M. M 55 

Schwarz, G. C 65 

Scheda, P 62 

Schweig, N 74 

Scott, H. B 55 

Seabold, W. M 65 

Seebert, C. T 46 

Seegar, J. K. B. E., Jr 60 

Segall, S 55 

Selvin, B. L 47 

Serpick, A 55 

Serra, L. M 55 

Settle, W. B 79 

Shaffer, J 74 

Shapiro, A 55 

Sharrett, J. 79 

Shaw, C. E 55 

Shea, W. H 55 

Shear, J 55 

Shell, J. H., Jr 60 

Sherman, J 55 

Sherrard, M. L 55 

Sherrer, E. L., Jr 55 

Sherrill, E 68 

Sherrill E. B 55 

Shin, M. L 62 

Shirai, A 58 

Shochet, B 74 

Shock, N. W 66 

Shockett, B. R 55 

Shotter, L 114 

Siegel, LA 60 

Siegman, A. W 74 

Sigman, B 65 

Sila, B 74 

Sila, U. 1 65 

Silber, M 68 

Silberman, R 58 

Silver, A. A 55 

Silverstein, E. H 56 

Simpson, D. G 56 



Sina, B 56 

Singleton, R. T 56 

Sinton, W. A., Jr 65 

Siwinski, A. G 79 

Sjodin, R. A 47 

Smith, D. C 45, 66 

Smith, J 74 

Smith, S 56 

Smith, S. W 60 

Smith, V. M 56 

Smoot, R. T 56 

Snyder, J 79, 114 

Snyder, J. M 46 

Snyder, J. N 56 

Snyder, M. J 56, 57 

Solomon, N 56, 66 

Speed, W. C, III 56 

Spencer, H. R 45 

Spicer, W. S., Jr 56 

Spiliadis, S 74 

Spitz, W 62 

Spragins, M 65 

Springate, C. S 62 

Spurling, C. L 56 

Srulevich, S 68 

Stambler, A. A 65 

Standiford, W. E 65 

Starcke, H 58 

Staufrer, J. C 49, 56 

Steenburg, R. W 79 

Steinbach, S. R 56 

Stephenson, R. R 57 

Stern, M 68 

Stewart, E. H., Jr 79 

Stewart, W. L 56, 68 

Stichel, F. L., Jr 79 

Stine, O. C 65 

Stone, W. S 62 

Strahan, J. E 56 

Stram, J. R 79 

Styrt, J 74 

Sunday, S. D 56 

Supik, W. J 79 

Sussman, S. W 47 

Sutton, G. G 58 

Swisher, K. Y., Jr 56 

T 

Tansey, J. J 79 

Tayback, M 68 

Taylor, T 74 

Teitelbaum, H. A 58 

Thistel, C 74 

Thomas, W. N 75 

Thompson, R. K 79 



University of Maryland • 133 



Tigertt, W. D 56 

Tignor, K 74 

Tildon, J. T 47, 65 

Tingey, H. B 80 

Togo, Y 56 

Toll, M. W 62 

Tominaga, S 49 

Toulson, W. H 45, 79 

Townshend, W. H., Jr 56 

Tramer, A 65 

Trattner, R. E 74 

Traub, R 57 

Tudino, M. E 56 

Tuerk, 1 74 

Twining, R. H 56 

U 

Uigur, U 74 

V 

Valderas, J. G 60 

Van Buskirk, C 58 

Vance, A 65 

Van Lill, S. J 56 

Vauls, K 74 

Ventling, CD 65 

Vidaver, R. M 74 

Villa Santa, U 60 

Vollmer, F. J 56 

Von Muehlen, L. H 74 

Voshell, A. F 45, 79 

W 

Waddell, A. D 48 

Wadsworth, G. E 46 

Waghelstein, J 56 

Wagner, J. A 62 

Walder, A. 1 79 

Walker, S. H 65 

Walker, W. W 79 

Wall, G. H 65 

Wall, L. A., Jr 56 

Wallop, W. H 75 

Walsh, W. T 58 

Wapnir, R. A 65 

Warfel, L. E 58 

Warsofsky, M 74 

Warthen, F. J 74 

Weaver, K. H 65 

Weber, R 57, 65 

Weeks, W. E 65 

Weinberg, T 62 

Weiner, I. H 79 

Weiner, S 75 



Weinstein, S 74 

Weintraub, W 74 

Weir, D. W 74 

Weisman, M. N 74 

Weiss, D 74 

Weiss, H, R 79 

Weiss, S. D 74 

Wells, G. E., Jr 60 

Wells, G. J 66 

Wells, R 58 

Wentzel, M. C 47 

Wenzel, R. P 57 

Wenzlaff, E. F 79 

White, E. L 66 

White, J. P., Ill 79 

Whitmarsh, G. A 75 

Wich, J. C 66 

Wideman, J. M 47 

Wiedman, A. K 79 

Wilfson, D 57 

Wilhelmsen, H. R 79 

Wilhelmsen, J 75 

Will, D. R 79 

Williams, C. H 57 

Wilson, E. F 62 

Wise, S. P 75 

Wisotzkey, H 62 

Wisseman, C. L., Jr 57 

Wiswell, J. G 57 

Wittier, R. C 58 

Wizenberg, M. J 75 

Wolfe, M. S 49 

Womack, W. S 60 

Wong, E 47 

Wood, C 62 

Woodbury, J. W 49 

Woodward, C. L 57 

Woodward, T. E 49 

Workman, J. B 57 

Worsley, T. L., Jr 57 

Wright, R. B 62 

Wright, C. E 66 

Wu, S. C 47 

Y 

Yaffe, S. N 57 

Yeager, G. H 80 

Yim, R. E 66 

Young, I. S 75 

Young, J. D., Jr 80 

Young, W. W 75 

Z 

Zarbin, G. L. F 66 

Zieve, P. D 57 

Zinn, W. F 45, 80 



Subject Index of the Medical School 



A 

Administration Building 28 

Administration 42 

Admission, requirements 6 

Advancement for graduation 10 

Air Force Reserve — Regular 

Officer Program 20 

Alpha Omega Alpha — 'National 

Medical Society 25 

American Medical Association 

Loans 22 

Anatomy 83 

Anesthesiology 85 

Application, method of making ... 8 

Arthritis 93 

Avalon Scholarship 20 

B 

Baccalaureate degree 13 

Balder Scholarship Award 18 

Baltimore City Hospital 38 

Baltimore Student Union Board ... 23 

Biological Chemistry 86 

Biophysics 86 

Bressler Research Laboratory .... 28 

C 

Cardiology 93 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology ... 88 
Clinical Pathological Conference 

Award 19 

Clinical Pathology 93 

Combined Doctor of Philosophy- 
Doctor of Medicine program ... 13 

Commencement 27 

Continuing Education Courses .... 112 

Curriculum, organization 9 

D 

Davidge Hall 28 

Dermatology 94 

Diplomas, application form 27 

Dr. Wayne W. Babcock Prize ... 19 

Dr. J. Edmund Bradley Prize 19 

Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger Prize 19 



Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial 

Prize 19 

Dr. Leonard M. Hummel Memorial 

Award 19 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr., Prize 19 

Dr. Milton S. Sacks Memorial 

Award 19 

Dr. John B. Weaver Fellowship . . 22 

E 

Endocrinology and Metabolism . . 94 

Endowment Fund 122 

Equipment, required 17 

Eye Research Foundation of 

Bethesda 39 

F 

Faculty 45 

Faculty Organization 44 

Faculty Prize 18 

Federal Health Professions 

Scholarship Program 20 

Federal Health Professions 

Student Loan Program 21 

Fees 15 

Fees, nonpayment 16 

Fees, re-examination 16 

Fellowships 22 

Financial aid 19 

Forensic Pathology 102 

G 

Gastroenterology 95 

General Faculty Rules 10 

General Information 22 

General Surgery 110 

Grading system 10 

Graduate program 13 

Graduation attendance 11 

Gray Laboratory 28 

H 

Health Sciences Library 32 

Historical Sketch 39 

Hospitalization 15 



134 



University of Maryland • 135 



Housing 26 

Honor Council 23 

Howard Hall 28 

Hypertension and Renal Disease . . 95 

I 

Infectious Diseases 96 

Intrafraternity Council 25 

International Medicine 89 

Internships and residencies 13 

K 

Kernan, James Lawrence, Hospital 
and Industrial School of Maryland 

for Crippled Children 36 

L 

Leave of absence 17 

Loans 21 

M 

Maryland General Hospital 38 

Medical School Alumni Association 123 

Medical Technology Building .... 28 

Medicine 90 

Mercy Hospital 36 

Microbiology 97 

N 

Neurology 98 

Neuropathology 101 

Neurosurgery 110 

Non-resident, definition 6 

Nuclear Medicine 95 

O 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 99 

Omega Mu 23 

Ophthalmology 100 

Orthopedic Surgery 110 

Otolaryngology Ill 

P 

Pathology 100 

Pediatrics 102 

Physical Diagnosis 96 

Physical Medicine 106 

Physical Therpay 114 

Physiology 103 

Preventive Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 105 

Prizes and Awards 19 

Psychiatry 107 

Pulmonary Diseases 96 



R 

Radiology 108 

Registration 15 

Registration fee 15 

Requirements for admission to 

advanced standing 8 

Requirements for admission to 

first year class 7 

Resident, definition 6 

Rules, general faculty 10 

S 

Scholarships 20 

State board examination, 

certification 11 

State Scholarships for General 

Practice 20 

Student Activities Committee 22 

Student Activities Fund 16 

Student American Medical 

Association 23 

Student Council 23 

Student Council Emergency 

Loan Fund 22 

Student Council Intramural 

Athletic Program 25 

Student employment 22 

Student Health Organization 25 

Student Health Service 25 

Student organizations 22 

Students orientation for new 9 

Student Research Fellowships 22 

Surgery 109 

T 

Thoracic Surgery Ill 

Tuition 15 

U 

University of Maryland Hospital . . 32 

University loans 21 

University scholarships 21 

Urologic Surgery Ill 

W 

Warfield Freshman Merit 

Scholarship 21 

Withdrawal, academic standing on . 17 

Withdrawal, and Refunds 16 

Withdrawal, refund of fees 17 

Women's Auxiliary, Student 

American Medical Association . 23 



Yearbook 25 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins 
January 20, 1955 
College Park, Maryland 






vO 



MAY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



JULY 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



o 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

MAY 

5 M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 

JULY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

DECEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 







JANUARY 




3 


M 


T W T 


F S 
1 2 




3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 




10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 




17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 




24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 


^ 
& 


31 

9 


M 


MAY 

T W T 


F S 

1 




2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 8 




9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 15 




16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 22 




23 


24 


25 26 27 


28 29 




30 


31 







FEBRUARY 

9 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 



JUNE 

9 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



MARCH 

9 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



JULY 

9 M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



APRIL 

9 M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 

9 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 






Sffo 



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SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



1971-1973 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN 




Contents 



Academic Calendar 2 

Aerial View of Campus 5 

Requirements for Admission 7 

Instructions Leading to Degree of Doctor of Medicine 10 

Additional Educational Programs 14 

Tuition, Fees, and Registration 16 

Required Equipment 18 

Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds, 

and Student Employment 19 

General Information 23 

Buildings and Facilities 28 

Affiliated Institutions 36 

Historical Sketch 39 

Administration 42 

Faculty Organization 46 

Faculty 47 

Organization of Curriculum and Courses of Instruction 81 

Continuing Education Courses 1 20 

Department of Physical Therapy 121 

Description of Courses, Physical Therapy 123 

Medical School Alumni Association 1 27 

Faculty Index 129 

Subject Index 1 40 

Calendar 1971-1973 Cover 3 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University 
reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further reserves the right, at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in 
the best interests of the University. 



CATALOG 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

1971-1973 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Medical School Calendar for 1971-1973 



AUGUST 


16-20 




SEPTEMBER 


8-10* 




SEPTEMBER 


13 


Monday 


NOVEMBER 


24 


Wednesday 


NOVEMBER 


29 


Monday 


DECEMBER 


22 


Wednesday 
J 972 S 


JANUARY 


3 


Monday 


JANUARY 


10-21* 




JANUARY 


17-21 




JANUARY 


21 


Friday 


JANUARY 


24 


Monday 


FEBRUARY 


21 


Monday 


MARCH 


30 


Thursday 



APRIL 



APRIL 




10-14 




APRIL 




17 


Monday 


MAY 




26 


Friday 


MAY 




29 


Monday 


JUNE 




2 


Friday 


MAY 


30-JUNE 


2 





7 977 SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Reexaminations for Advancement 

Orientation Programs and Registration 

First Day of Instruction — All Classes 

Thanksgiving recess begins at 5 P.M. 
All Classes 

Instruction resumes for all classes 

Christmas recess begins at 5 P.M. 
All Classes 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Instruction resumes for all classes 

REGISTRATION & PAYMENT OF FEES 
BY MAIL— All Classes 

Exam Week — Freshman Year 

Last day of the First Semester 

Beginning of Second Semester 

Holiday — Washington's Birthday 

Easter recess begins for 3rd and 4th Years 
at 5 P.M. 

Instruction resumes for 3rd and 4th Year 
Students 

Spring Vacation begins at 5 P.M., April 7, 
for 1st and 2nd Year Students 

Instruction resumes for 1st and 2nd Year 
Students 

Instruction ends — All classes 

Memorial Day 

Precommencement and Commencement — 
Baltimore Campus 

Examinations for 1st and 2nd Years 



Tuesday 



* All students are to complete registration, including the payment of fees, on regular 
registration days. Those who do not complete their registration on the prescribed days will 
be charged a PENALTY FEE of $20.00. The Office of the Registrar and the Comptroller 
are located in Howard Hall and are open for registration from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. 



AUGUST 


14-18 




SEPTEMBER 


6-8* 




SEPTEMBER 


11 


Monday 


NOVEMBER 


22 


Wednesday 


NOVEMBER 


27 


Monday 


DECEMBER 


22 


Wednesday 
1973 S 


JANUARY 


3 


Monday 


JANUARY 


8-19* 




JANUARY 


15-19 




JANUARY 


19 


Friday 


JANUARY 


22 


Monday 


FEBRUARY 


19 


Monday 


APRIL 


19 


Thursday 



APRIL 



24 Tuesday 



APRIL 


9-13 




APRIL 


16 


Monday 


MAY 


25 


Friday 


MAY 


28 


Monday 


JUNE 


1 


Friday 


MAY 29-JUNE 1 







7 972 SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Reexaminations for Advancement- 
Orientation Programs and Registration 
First Day of Instruction — All Classes 

Thanksgiving recess begins at 5 P.M. 
All Classes 

Instruction resumes for all classes 

Christmas recess begin at 5 P.M. 
All Classes 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Instruction resumes for all classes 

REGISTRATION & PAYMENT OF FEES 
BY MAIL— All Classes 

Exam Week — Freshman Year 

Last day of the First Semester 

Beginning of Second Semester 

Holiday — Washington's Birthday 

Easter recess begins for 3rd and 4th Years 
at 5 P.M. 

Instruction resumes for 3rd and 4th Year 
Students 

Spring Vacation begins at 5 P.M., April 6, 
for 1st and 2nd Year Students 

Instruction resumes for 1st and 2nd Year 
Students 

Instruction ends — All classes 

Memorial Day 

Precommencement and Commencement — 
Baltimore Campus 

Examinations for 1st and 2nd Years 



*AII students are to complete registration, including the payment of fees, on regular 
registration days. Those who do not complete their registration on the prescribed days will 
be charged a PENALTY FEE of $20.00. The Office of the Registrar and the Comptroller 
are located in Howard Hall and are open for registration from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. 



KEY TO MAP 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



BRB- 


-Bressler Research Building 
20 S. Greene Street 


MEB 


BU- 


-Baltimore Union 

621 W. Lombard Street 


MTB 


CPC- 


-Community Pediatric Center 
412 W. Redwood Street 


NPA 


"CST- 


-Center for the Study of Trauma 
22 S. Greene Street 


OPD 


DC- 


-Dental Clinic 

610-618 W. Lombard Street 


PH 


DH- 


-Dunning Hall 






(School of Pharmacy) 


PI 




636 W. Lombard Street 




DPB- 


-Dental-Pharmacy Building 
32 S. Greene Street 


PKG- 


DVH- 


-Davidge Hall 

(School of Medicine) 


PKG 




522 W. Lombard Street 


RH- 


GL- 


-Gray Laboratory 

520 Rear W. Lombard Street 




HH- 


-Howard Hall 






660 W. Redwood Street 


SF 


HHH- 


-Hayden-Harris Hall 






(School of Dentistry) 


SNB 




666 W. Baltimore Street 




HLMH- 


-H. L. Mencken House 
1524 Hollins Street 


SSW & AB 


HSL- 


-Health Sciences Library 






111S. Greene Street 


UCB- 


KM- 


-Kelly Memorial Building 






650 W. Lombard Street 


UH 


LB- 


-Lombard Building 






51 1 W. Lombard Street 


WH- 


LH- 


-Lane Hall 

(School of Law) 






500 W. Baltimore Street 


WHC- 



Medical Examiner's Building 

1 1 1 Penn Street 
Medical Technology Building 

31 S. Greene Street 
National Pituitary Agency 

210 W. Fayette Street 
Outpatient Department 

601 W. Lombard Street 
Parsons Hall 

(Nurses' Residence) 

624 W. Lombard Street 
Psychiatric Institute 

645 W. Redwood Street 
Parking University Garage 

701 W. Redwood Street 
Parking University Garage 

633 W. Fayette Street 
Redwood Hall 

(Community Mental Healtf 
Center) 

721 W. Redwood Street 
Storage Facility 

710 W. Lombard Street 
School of Nursing Building 

655 W. Lombard Street 
School of Social Work & 

Administration Building 

525 W. Redwood Street 
University College Building 

520 W. Lombard Street 
University Hospital 

22 S. Greene Street 
Whitehurst Hall 

(School of Nursing) 

W. Lombard Street 
Western Health Clinic 

700 W. Lombard Street 




U. OF M AT BALTIMORE 




JOHN H. MOXLEY III, M.D., Dean 



Requirements for Admission 

General Statement. The University of Maryland, in all its branches and di- 
visions, subscribes to a policy of equal educational opportunity for peoples of 
all races, creeds and ethnic origins. 

Policy on Admissions 

Academic achievement, extra-curricular activities, personal characteristics, 
recommendations from college instructors or the premedical committee, scores 
on the Medical College Admissions Test, and personal interview are all care- 
fully considered in evaluating an applicant. Academic achievement alone does 
not automatically insure acceptance as the Committee is equally concerned 
with personality, communication skills, character, integrity, motivation, and 
assessment of the individual as a potential physician. A letter of recommenda- 
tion is required from the premedical committee. If there is no premedical 
committee, letters are requested from two science and one non-science course 
instructors. Candidates will be expected to complete all required premedical 
courses before June 15 of the year they are to matriculate. With permission 
of the Committee on Admissions, this requirement at times may be waived. All 
courses must be completed prior to registration in the School of Medicine in 
September. 

Matriculants are required to accept the provisions of the Honor Code and 
to agree to assume its obligations prior to registration. A copy of the Honor 
Code and agreement form is sent to each candidate with notice of acceptance. 

Although preference will be given to Maryland residents, applications from 
well qualified students from other areas of the United States and Canada are 
welcome. Because of the many applicants for the number of places available, 
applicants can be considered only if they are citizens of the United States or 
Canada. Applicants from foreign schools must complete at least two years of 
premedical work in an approved college or university in the United States or 
Canada. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of 
Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a minor is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless his parents move to and become legal residents of Maryland by main- 
taining such residence for at least six months. However, the right of the minor 
student to change from a non-resident status to resident status must be estab- 
lished by his parents or legal guardian prior to the registration period set for 
any semester. 



8 I School of Medicine 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. An adult may change his status from non-resident 
to resident by withdrawing from the University for six months and remaining 
in the state as a civilian not enrolled in any other institution for more than 
eight semester hours of credit. Time spent on active duty in the armed services 
while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six-months 
period referred to above unless the individual's home of record on his official 
military records is the State of Maryland. In the case of both military person- 
nel and adults, residence may be established through ownership and main- 
tenance of a home in the state which is the student's primary place of domicile. 

Procedures are available for reviewing the residence status of students. 
Individuals seeking to appeal the decisions concerning their residence status 
should contact the Office of Admissions. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be main- 
tained. 

Requirements for Admission to First Year Class 

Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses, par- 
ticularly in the sciences. Except under unusual circumstances the student should 
plan a four year curriculum with a suitable Arts and Science major leading to 
a bachelor's degree. A major in an area other than science is quite accept- 
able although it is not intended to divert students from a science major if this 
is their field of choice. The student taking science courses beyond the minimal 
requirements is encouraged to take such subjects as embryology, comparative 
anatomy, psychology, anthropology, physical chemistry, or cellular physiology. 
Courses duplicating medical school work are not recommended unless they 
are required in the student's major sequence. Having credit in such courses 
will not excuse students from taking them in medical school. However, the op- 
portunity to place out of biochemistry by written examination is offered. In 
the non-science area courses in English, philosophy, sociology, economics, his- 
tory and government and politics are recommended. Mathematics through 
calculus is also recommended. 

Applicants who choose a non-science major should take a sequence of 
science courses which demonstrates their academic ability to capably handle 
the demands made by science oriented curriculum. 

A minimum of 90 semester hours (three academic years) of acceptable col- 
lege credit is required exclusive of physical education and military science, 
earned in colleges of arts and sciences whose names occur on the current list 
of "Accredited Institutions of Higher Education" as compiled by the National 
Committee of Regional Accrediting Agencies of the United States. Applicants 
who will have earned a bachelor's degree in arts and sciences before regis- 
tration for medical school from an approved college or university will be given 
preference over applicants who have not completed the requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. Only those courses will be acceptable which are approved 
for credit towards an A.B. or B.S. degree by the university or college attended 
as well as the University of Maryland. 



University of Maryland I 9 

The following college courses and credits at an acceptable level are re- 
quired before registering for Medical School. 

Semester Hours 

General biology or zoology 8 

Inorganic chemistry 8 

Organic chemistry 6 

General physics 8 

English 6 

No more than 60 hours can be accepted from accredited Junior Colleges 
and then only if these credits are validated by a college offering a Bachelor 
of Arts or Science Degree. 

Applicants over the age of 28 cannot be encouraged to apply. 

An evaluation of the applicant's credentials is made by members of the 
Committee of Admissions to determine if an interview is to be requested. This 
decision is based upon a composite estimate of the applicant's ability and 
future promise in the field of medicine as measured by his academic record 
to date, performance in the Medical College Admissions Test, recommenda- 
tions of the premedical faculty, extracurricular activities, and the applicant's 
overall standing as compared with that of the other applicant's applying that 
year. Such interviews must be scheduled in advance at the initiative of the 
Committee. 

The Medical College Admission Test should be taken in May and must be 
taken no later than October of the year preceding the year of entrance. Ap- 
plicants should write the Psychological Testing Corporation, 304 East 45th 
Street, New York, New York 10017, for further information and for registra- 
tion forms. 

Requirements for Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students who have attended approved medical schools are eligible to file 
applications for admission to the second and third year classes only. These ap- 
plicants must meet the current first year entrance requirements in addition to 
presenting acceptable medical school credentials and a medical school record 
based on courses which are equivalent to similar courses in this school. 

Application for advanced standing must be made no later than April 15 of 
the year of desired admission. 

No student can be considered who has been dismissed from any medical 
school unless his former Dean submits a letter addressed to the Committee 
on Admissions stating the student is reinstated in good standing and eligible 
for promotion. 

No student can be considered who is not eligible for promotion at time of 
transfer. 

Persons who already hold the degree of Doctor of Medicine will not be ad- 
mitted to the Medical School as a candidate for that degree from this Uni- 
versity. 

No applicants from foreign medical schools can be considered for advanced 
standing. 

Application for admission to advanced standing is made in accordance 
with instructions accompanying the application form. 



7 / School of Medicine 

Method of Making Application 

The School of Medicine is participating with the American Medical College 
Application Service (AMCAS). Requests for application material for the first 
year class may be obtained from either AMCAS, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 or The Committee on Admissions, School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland, 660 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. 

Application for admission to the first year class entering in September must 
be filed between July 1 and December 15 of the year prior to desired admis- 
sion. Requests for application forms should be made after June 15. Applica- 
tion material cannot be released after December 1. The deadline for receiving 
the application form is December 15. 

It is very definitely in the best interests of the applicant to file the applica- 
tion form and supporting credentials early in the application period. Please 
do not have supporting credentials sent prior to filing a final application. 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to see that all required credentials 
and the completed application packet are filed with and received by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. This especially applies to the letter of recommendation 
from the premedical committee, transcripts from all institutions attended (sent 
directly from that institution to the Committee), and the scores on the Medical 
College Admissions Test. 

Orientation for New Students 

All new students, whether they are admitted to the first year class or with 
advanced standing, are expected to attend Orientation for New Students. 



Instruction Leading to the 
Degree of Doctor of Medicine 

Organization of Curriculum 

Broadly stated, the educational objectives of the School of Medicine are 
as follows: 

1. To educate students in a manner which will enable them to function 
at a high level of technical competence and social awareness in an 
ever-changing, constantly demanding profession. 

2. To provide opportunities for students at every level of training to pur- 
sue areas of special interest in depth, whether for intellectual stimu- 
lation or furtherance of a career choice. 

3. To train a variety of individuals to form the core of highly competent 
professionals who will practice medicine as generalists or specialists, 
teach full time or part time, or continue to add to human knowledge 
through research. 

More specifically, the curriculum has been designed to meet educational 
contingencies as they arise. To this end the faculty has established as a basic 



University of Maryland I 1 1 

principle continuous curricular review and has empaneled a standing Cur- 
riculum Committee. It is charged with the responsibility of monitoring the 
curriculum and recommending changes whenever they are deemed necessary. 

The curriculum varies from year to year to meet students' changing educa- 
tional needs. It preserves the standard or classical sequence of subject mat- 
ter but the method by which each is presented is modified. The first year 
provides general and overview courses in the basic sciences. Free time is 
scheduled for outside reading and independent study. Small group confer- 
ences are offered in some subjects in lieu of, or in addition to, laboratory 
experiences. 

The second year introduces in the first semester the second level basic 
material. In the second semester instruction shifts to a subject system orienta- 
tion. The emphasis in this approach is interdisciplinary. 

In the first and second years efforts are made to indicate the clinical 
relevance of subject matter. A course entitled "Correlative Medicine" intro- 
duces the students to patients with clinical problems related to material being 
studied in Biochemistry, Anatomy and Physiology. In addition, Embryology 
has established working arrangements with the departments of Pediatrics 
and Otolaryngology who present patients with embryologically-based prob- 
lems. 

In the second year, during the subject systems teaching, clinical specialties 
participate in the presentation of basic material. 

Courses offered in the first two years are as follows: 

Year 1 . Anatomy— Gross and Microscopic 
Biochemistry 
Biophysics 
Biostatistics 
Correlative Medicine 
Embryology 
Genetics 

Introduction to Clinical Practice— Beginning Physical Diagnosis 
Neurological Sciences 
Physiology 
Psychiatry 
Sociology 

Year 2. Clinical Pathology 

Community Medicine— Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine 

Microbiology 

Pathology— General and Special 

Pharmacology 

Physical Diagnosis 

Psychiatry 

These subjects are taught in an interdisciplinary fashion in the second semester 
as subject systems. Correlation of content is made as part of a conference 
entitled Introduction to the Mechanisms of Disease. The systems studied are 
Gastrointestinal, Nervous, Cardiovascular, Musculoskeletal, Renal, Endocrine, 
Reproductive and Respiratory. 

The two clinical years, like the preclinical, must be viewed as a unity. The 



12 I School of Medicine 

third year provides a basic clinical experience in five major specialty areas: 
Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Psychiatry- 
Neurology. Instruction in each of these disciplines is presented as the "core" 
or minimum experience needed by all students before moving into the senior 
(elective) year. 

The senior year is highly flexible and individualized. Students are offered 
a 48-week year from which they will be granted 12 weeks of vacation or 
free time, to be taken when they elect. They are required to take a 12 week 
experience— six weeks of which is a combined experience in ambulatory care 
and preventive medicine. (Primarily a clinical clerkship in ambulatory care with 
two mornings a week given to more didactic sessions in preventive medicine.) 
The remaining 6 weeks are made up of a combined Anesthesiology, Ophthal- 
mology and Radiology clerkships. The remaining 24 weeks are to be filled 
with a program of the student's own design with the advice and consent 
of a faculty advisor. At the present time the student has over 200 faculty- 
approved elective programs from which to choose. 

General Faculty Rules 

The University authorities reserve the right to make changes in the curricu- 
lum, the requirements for advancement and graduation, fees, and in rules 
and regulations whenever appropriate. 

Students who report for classes later than one week after scheduled time 
will be permitted to begin work only by permission of the Dean. 

Attendance at all scheduled classes is expected. 

Notice of change of address should be submitted promptly to the Dean's 
Office and to the Registrar's Office. 

Grades and Promotion 

Official grades are designated by these symbols: 

H— honors, completion of the course with exceptional performance 
P— satisfactory completion of the course 
F— failure 

When circumstances beyond a student's control make it impossible for 
him to complete a course at the usual time, he will be given an Incomplete (I) 
until such time as he has completed the course. An "I" is in no way prejudicial 
to the final rating or grade of the student in the course. 

Periodically throughout the academic year, the Advancement Committee 
convenes to review the records of all students in each class. The estimate 
of a student's academic status is based on academic achievement, his moral 
and ethical traits and general evaluation of his fitness for a career in medicine. 

Students with one or more failures, at the discretion of the Advancement 
Committee, may be allowed to remove the "F" by: reexamination; repetition 
of the course, the semester, the entire year at the School of Medicine or the 
course at any school satisfactory to the department head, or may be dismissed. 

Students who repeat a year and who do not show significant improvement 
in all courses may, at the discretion of the Advancement Committee, be dis- 
missed. All "F" grades must be absolved prior to graduation. 

The faculty reserves the right to determine if a student may withdraw, re- 



University of Maryland I 1 3 

peat, advance or graduate on academic or moral and personal grounds, in- 
cluding traits of character. 

All discretionary actions of the Advancement Committee are subject to 
ratification by the Faculty Board and must be presented to them at their next 
meeting. 

Certification for State Board Examinations 

Students at the end of their second and fourth years will be certified to the 
State Board of Examiners if they have successfully completed the requirements 
for promotion to the third year or for graduation. 

Diplomas 

Members of the Senior Class must fill out an "Application for Diploma 
Form." 

Commencement 

All graduating seniors are required to attend the Pre-commencement and 
Commencement ceremonies unless excused in writing by the Dean. 






Additional Educational Programs 

Baccalaureate Degree 

Selected students entering the School of Medicine from colleges which 
usually grant a baccalaureate degree after the successful completion of the 
first year of medicine, are responsible for: a) providing a certificate from his 
college or university that he is eligible for this degree, and b) meeting all re- 
quirements of the School of Medicine for advancement to the second year. 

Graduate Program 

Graduate courses and research opportunities leading to advanced degrees 
are available in most of the basic science departments of the School of 
Medicine. Students pursuing graduate work must register in the Graduate 
School of the University of Maryland and meet the same requirements as other 
graduate students. Detailed information concerning fees, scholarships, and 
other material of general nature, may be found in the University publication 
titled An Adventure in Learning. This may be obtained from the Office of 
University Relations, North Administration Building, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Combined Doctor of Philosophy — Doctor of Medicine Program 

Properly qualified medical students may elect to enter the combined educa- 
tional program leading to Doctor of Medicine and a graduate degree. Such 
students may arrange a leave of absence of up to three years at the end of 
their second or third year in medical school to become candidates for either 
SA.S. or Ph.D. in one of the basic medical sciences. Before entering the com- 
bined program, students must meet the requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School and be acceptable to {he department of their choice as a 
candidate for an advanced degree. 

Additional Educational Programs 

Research training in international health is accomplished through the 
mechanism of a Research Associate program under the Institute of Interna- 
tional Medicine. This program provides for post-doctoral training in research 
on a broad spectrum of health problems of developing nations. 

Internships and Residencies 

The University of Maryland Hospital offers the following graduate specialty 
training programs for interns and residents. These programs are approved by 
the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 
Association. 

14 



University of Maryland I 7 5 

The Hospital participates in the National Intern Matching Program to fill its 
35 approved intern positions. The program includes rotating internships and 
straight internships in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and pathology. 

Approved residency programs are offered in the following specialty areas: 
Department of Medicine: Internal Medicine, Dermatology, Family 

Practice 
Department of Surgery: General Surgery, Neurological Surgery, 

Orthopedic Surgery, Thoracic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Urology 
Department of Pediatrics: Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy 
Department of Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry 
Department of Anesthesiology: Anesthesiology 
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology: Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Department of Pathology: Pathology 

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine: Rehabilitation Medicine 
Department of Radiology: Radiology 
Department of Neurology: Neurology 
Department of Preventive Medicine: Preventive Medicine 
Department of Ophthalmology: Ophthalmology 
In total, approximately 250 resident positions are offered. 

Appointments to intern and resident positions are made by the Director of 
the Hospital upon the recommendations of the House Staff Committee of the 
Medical Board or, in the case of residents, upon the recommendations of the 
appropriate Clinical Department Head. Correspondence and applications 
should be addressed to: 

THE DIRECTOR 

University of Maryland Hospital 
Redwood and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Additional Education Programs 

Research training in international health is accomplished through the mech- 
anism of a Research Associate program under the Institute of International 
Medicine. This program provides for post-doctoral training in research on a 
broad spectrum of health problems of developing nations. 



Tuition, Fees and Resistration 

Current Fees 

Application Fee $ 7.50 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) 10.00 

Tuition— Resident of Maryland 900.00 

Tuition-Non-Residents 1600.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Student Activities Fee 23.50 

Student Health Fee 1 0.00 

*Student Union Fee 30.00 

"Special Fee 25.00 

***Hospital Insurance (Blue Cross) 

Individual Plan 61 .68 

Parent and Child 1 29.60 

Family Plan 162.24 

The application fee should be submitted with the formal application to 
medical school. A deposit on tuition of $50 is required of all applicants be- 
fore the expiration date specified in the offer of acceptance. The deposit on 
tuition will be credited against first semester charges. In the event of with- 
drawal before registration, the advanced deposit will be returned on request, 
if requested before March 1. 

Registration 

For the fall semester, all students, after proper certification, are requested 
to complete a set of registration cards to be obtained from the Office of the 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. All students are expected to complete their 
registration, including the payment of bills on the registration days. Those who 
do not complete their registration on the prescribed days will be charged a 
fee of $20.00. 

One-half of the tuition fee and all of the following— the laboratory fee, 
the student health fee, the student union fee, the National Board Examina- 
tion fee, the special fee, and the student activities fee are payable on the 
date specified for registration for the first semester. Blue Cross Hospitaliza- 
tion for six months in advance is paid at the beginning of each semester. 

*The Student Union Fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional Schools on 
the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction 
of the Union Building. 

**The Special Fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools 
on the Baltimore Campus and is used to finance equipment for the Union Building. 

**Membership of the student in Blue Cross or any other acceptable hospital insurance 
is required. Each student must produce certified proof of such membership at the time of 
registration. Rates are subject to change. 

16 



University of Maryland I 1 7 

The remainder of the tuition fee shall be paid on the date designated 
for the payment of fees for the second semester. Fourth year students shall 
pay the graduation fee, in addition, at this time. 

Any enrolled student may request at registration the postponement of 
payment of one half his tuition charges (but not fees) for 30 days. This 
service is interest free and requires only the student's promise to pay by 
that date. 

Non-payment of Fees 

If semester fees are not paid in full on the specified registration dates, a 
penalty of $20.00 will be added. 

If a satisfactory settlement or an agreement for settlement is not made 
with the business office within ten days after a payment is due, the student 
automatically is debarred from attendance at classes and will forfeit the 
other privileges of the School of Medicine. 

Re-examination Fee 

A student who is eligible for re-examination must secure a bill in the 
amount of $5.00 from the Registrar's Office, make payment to the Cashier 
for each subject in which he is to be examined, and present the receipt to 
the faculty member giving the examination before he will be permitted to 
take the examination. 



Student Activities Fund 

This fund supports all student activities and is budgeted by the Student 
Council in accordance with its own by-laws. All expenditures from this fund 
must be approved by the Student Council. The fund supports the student 
recreational and social program, representation at national conventions for 
certain student organizations, the cost of registration in the National Intern- 
ship Matching Program as well as other activities. A portion of the fund 
is allocated to the yearbook and provides each medical student with a copy 
of this publication. On registration all students are given a copy of The 
Student Handbook containing The Honor Code and The By-Laws of the Honor 
Council together with the By-Laws of the Student Council. 

Withdrawals and Refunds 

Students desiring to leave the School of Medicine at any time during the 
academic year are required to file with the Dean a letter of resignation. 
The student must satisfy the authorities that he has no outstanding obliga- 
tions to the school and must return his Student Identity Card and Matricula- 
tion Card. 

If these procedures are not completed, the student will not be entitled to 
honorable dismissal nor to refund of fees. 

Students under 21 years of age must supplement the procedures pre- 
viously described with the written consent of their parents or guardians. 



18 I School of Medicine 

Academic Standing On Withdrawal 

Students who voluntarily withdraw during an academic semester will be 
given no credit. 

Students are not permitted to resort to withdrawal in order to preclude 
current or impending failures. Their standing on withdrawal will be recorded 
in the Registrar's Office. 

Students who withdraw from the School of Medicine, and later desire 
readmission, must apply to the Committee on Admissions, unless other 
arrangements have been consumated with the Dean's written consent. 

Refunds On Withdrawal 

Students who are eligible to honorable dismissal will receive a refund of 
current charges, after the matriculation fee has been deducted, according 
to the following schedule: 

Periods Elapsed After Instruction Begins 

Percentage 
Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

After five weeks 0% 

Leave Of Absence 

Students who are in good standing may be granted one year's leave of 
absence on request to the Dean. Longer leaves can be arranged only under 
special circumstances except those students in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. 
program. 



Required Equipment 



At the beginning of the first year, all freshmen must possess a complete 
set of dissecting instruments similar to the one on display in the bookstore. 
In addition, they must provide themselves with a standard monocular or 
binocular microscope equipped with a mechanical stage and a substage 
lamp, and the following additional attachments: 

30 mm., 4x 0.1N.A. 
16 mm., lOx, 0.25N.A. 
4 mm., 43x, 0.65N.A. 
1.8 mm., 97x, oil immersion, 1.25 N.A. 
Oculars: lOx 

A substage condenser (1.25N.A.) with rack and pinion focusing de- 
vice 
A carrying case is recommended 



University of Maryland I 19 

Students are cautioned with respect to the purchase of used or odd-lot 
microscopes since some of the older instruments are in poor optical or 
mechanical condition, and in addition, some are equipped with a 4 mm. 
(high dry) objective whose N.A. is marked as 0.85. This objective has 
such a short working distance (0.3 mm.) that it is difficult or impossible to 
focus through thick cover glasses or the standard hemocytometer cover 
glass without breakage. 

All microscopes will be checked during the first scheduled laboratory 
in Microanatomy. 

Other instruments and equipment may be needed. The student will be 
informed of these needs by the department involved at an appropriate 
time. 

Students in the second year class are also expected to provide them- 
selves with short white lapel coats. Three button, 8-ounce sanforized duck 
coats are satisfactory. 



Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships, 
Loan Funds, and Student Employment 

Prizes 

The Faculty Prize 

The Faculty will award the Faculty Gold Medal and Certificate and 
five or more Certificates of Honor to those highest ranking candidates for 
graduation who, during the four academic years, have exhibited outstand- 
ing qualifications for the practice of medicine. 

The Balder Scholarship Award 

Each year a prize of $500 will be awarded for outstanding academic 
achievement to a graduating senior. 

The Dr. J. Edmund Bradley Prize 

Each year a prize of $100 is awarded to a graduating senior who has 
performed with special excellence in Pediatrics. This award is given in 
honor of Dr. Bradley, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics. 

The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize 

A prize of $25, given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a memorial 
to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, is awarded to the student in the fourth 
year class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

The Dr. Leonard M. Hummel Memorial Award 

A gold medal and Certificate of Proficiency will be awarded annually 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Leonard M. Hummel to the graduate selected 
by the Executive Committee of the Faculty who has manifested outstand- 
ing qualifications in Internal Medicine. 



20 I School of Medicine 

The Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr., Prize 

A prize of $25 is given each year in honor of Dr. Harry M. Robinson, 
Sr., late Professor Emeritus of Dermatology, to the member of the fourth 
year class selected by the Faculty who has done outstanding work in Derma- 
tology. 

The Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger Prize 

A prize of $100 is given each year in honor of Dr. Jacob E. Fine- 
singer, late Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry, to 
the member of the fourth year class selected by the Faculty who has 
done outstanding work in Psychiatry. 

The Dr. Milton S. Sacks Memorial Award 

A prize of $100 is given each year in honor of Dr. Milton S. Sacks, 
late Professor of Medicine and Hematology, to the member of the fourth 
year class selected by the Faculty who has performed with special ex- 
cellence in Medicine and Hematology. 

The Dr. Wayne W. Babcodc Prize 

Each year a prize of $50 will be awarded to a graduating senior 
for outstanding work in Surgery as a memorial to Dr. Wayne W. Babcock. 

The Clinical Pathological Conference Award 

The junior or senior student who has performed most ably throughout 
the academic year in the diagnosis of clinical pathological conference 
cases will receive an award of $50 and will have his name appropriately 
inscribed on a plaque in Gordon Wilson Hall. 

Financial Aid 

The supervision of financial aid for medical students rests with the 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, 103 Davidge Hall. In general, all Uni- 
versity scholarships and most Federal scholarships and loans are awarded 
on an annual basis in July prior to the academic year. Relevant applications 
must be complete by June 1 . A far smaller number of Federal scholarships, 
Federal loans, and University loans are awarded in October and in January. 

Scholarships 

ALL CLASSES 

Federal Health Professions Scholarship Program 

Members of the class may apply for Federal Scholarships awarded 
on the basis of need alone to "students of exceptional financial need 
who need such assistance to pursue a course of study." Those students 
eligible for such scholarships may anticipate a total educational indebt- 
edness at the end of Medical School not substantially in excess of $5000. 
Such scholarships, which are renewable after annual reassessment of 
both needs and resources, may be as high as $2500 per year. No 






University of* Maryland I 21 

Federal Scholarship will be awarded to students who do not also si- 
multaneously request and receive a Federal Health Professions Loan. 

State Scholarships For General Practice 

The State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21218, offers 10 scholarships each year in the amount of $1500 
per year. Such awards, which are renewable annually, may be made to 
needy students anticipating or having a bachelor's degree in the year 
of the award. The students must have been residents of Maryland for 
five years prior to the time of application. The awards, based on need 
and academic merit, will be given to students only if they sign a bond 
to "engage in general practice of medicine for no less than three years 
in an area of need in the State of Maryland so designated by the State 
Health Department. . . ." Applications for these awards should be made 
directly to the State Scholarship Board; they must be submitted by April 1 
prior to the relevant academic year. 

Air Force Reserve— Regular Officer Program 

Students who will be 26 years old or less when they enter Medical 
School and have or are capable of obtaining an Air Force Commission 
are eligible for a special program. Students selected in a nationwide 
competition will receive full pay and allowances as well as reimbursement 
for tuition, fees, equipment and books throughout their Medical School 
tenure. In repayment they must remain in the Air Force for two or three 
years for each year they receive such financial support. Detailed infor- 
mation shall be obtained as soon after acceptance as possible from 
USAFMPC (AF MSMB-4) Randolph AFB, Texas 78148. 

FOR FRESHMEN ONLY 
Avalon Scholarship 

An Avalon Scholarship, with a stipend of $650, will be awarded to 
the member of the incoming freshman class who shows the greatest 
promise of a successful career in medicine. All accepted students are 
eligible whether resident or non-resident. Formal application is not nec- 
essary in that all admitted students are automatically considered. At the 
end of each academic year, the recipient's record will be reviewed by 
the Committee on Scholarships and Loans and the scholarship extended 
for another year if the record warrants. Any recipient who does not 
stand at least in the upper third of the class may not be considered 
eligible for renewal. If an applicant is awarded an Avalon Scholar- 
ship, it is understood that during its tenure he will accept no outside 
remunerative employment during the school year without approval of 
the Office of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. 

Warfield Freshman Merit Scholarship 

Five scholarships, each with a stipend of $650, are available to 
members of the first year class who are residents of Maryland and who 
have demonstrated outstanding potentiality for the study of medicine. 



22 I School of Medicine 

Selection will be based on the credentials submitted in support of the 
applicant's request for admission. Formal application is not necessary in that 
all admitted students who are residents are automatically considered. The 
committee reserves the right to withhold scholarship awards, if, in its opinion, 
there are no qualified applicants in any particular year. These scholarships 
are available for first year students only, and therefore are not renewable. 
Recipients may apply in later years for Medical School Scholarships open 
to upperclassmen. 

FOR UPPERCLASSMEN ONLY 
University Scholarships 

Over 50 University Scholarships are available to members of the three 
upperclasses with stipends ranging from $250-$ 1000 a year, with an aver- 
age of about $500. Almost half of these scholarships are derived from the 
kind bequest of the estate of Dr. Michael Vinceguerra. All scholarships 
are awarded for one academic year and will be renewed only on applica- 
tion. Awards are made on a competitive basis with both academic profici- 
ency and need as a major consideration. Students who do not qualify for 
scholarships may apply for student loans. 

Loans 

Federal Health Professions Student Loan Program 

Significant financial assistance is available to all students in need from 
the Federal Health Professions Student Loan Program. Loans up to $2500 
per year are repayable over a 10-year period, beginning one or more years 
after graduation, subsequent to completion of internship and residency 
training. No interest is charged on the loans until the beginning of the re- 
payment period, when a 3% interest will be charged. 

University Loans 

Loans from a number of funds under direct Medical School control are 
available to medical students who are in financial need. Application may 
be made at any time, although most applications are made and considered 
shortly before the beginning of the second semester. Except in unusual cir- 
cumstances, loans from Medical School funds are limited to $400 a year. 
Such loans are awarded on the basis of need. Most loans are to be repaid 
in five equal installments with the first payment on the loan being due at 
the end of the fifth year following graduation. At that time simple interest 
of 3% begins to accrue. 

American Medical Association Loans 

The American Medical Association will guarantee loans up to $1500 per 
year to medical students with 6.5% interest. Repayment must begin on the 
first day of the fifth month after completing training including internship 
and residency. Thereafter there will be a 7% interest charged on the unpaid 
balance. 



University of Maryland I 23 

Student Council Emergency Loan Fund 

The Student Council of the Medical School has established an Emer- 
gency Loan Fund for all medical students. When funds are available, loans 
are without interest, are limited to $400, and must be repaid within 120 
days. 

Fellowships 

Student Research Fellowships 

Over 100 Student Summer Research Fellowships are available annually 
upon application to the Committee on Scholarships and Loans or to the 
individual departments of the School of Medicine. A very limited number 
of student research fellowships are awarded for work during the academic 
year by selected departments. 

The Dr. John B. Weaver Fellowships 

The Will of Dr. John B. Weaver, who died in 1929, authorized the 
Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland to establish 
fellowships in his name. Two such fellowships, each in the amount of $1500, 
will be awarded annually to applicants who as physicians are full time 
fellows in research or teaching in the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine. 

Student Employment 

Students engaging in outside work during the academic year must re- 
port such activities to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at the be- 
ginning of the school year or at anytime during the school year that 
such work is undertaken. Students of any class designated by an appro- 
priate Advancement Committee to be in academic difficulty will not en- 
gage in part time employment without the approval of the Assistant Dean 
of Student Affairs. Students considering outside employment in a clinical 
setting are encouraged to review carefully the opinion of the Law De- 
partment of the American Medical Association entitled "Employment of 
Medical Students as Externs." 



General Information 

Organizations 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

This Committee serves to coordinate and integrate the activities of all 
student groups and to act as liaison between the student body, the ad- 
ministration, and the faculty. Members are: President of the Student Coun- 
cil, Class Presidents, Chairman of the Honor Council, President of the Stu- 
dent American Medical Association, President of the Interfraternity Council, 



hH 




Bressler Building 



University of Maryland I 25 

President of Alpha Omega Alpha, President of the Women's Auxiliary to the 
Student American Medical Association, Editor of the Yearbook, Editor of 
the Asclepian, Chairman of the Student Health Organization, Chairwoman 
of the Omega Mu Sorority, Treasurer of the Medical Student Council, and 
Class Presidents of the Junior and Senior Department of Physical Therapy. 
The Assistant Deans and those faculty members appointed by the Faculty 
Board are also members. 

A subcommittee, Student-Faculty Council meets periodically to discuss 
topics of special interest to the medical community. 

Student Council 

Each year the student body elects the Student Council which formulates 
and directs policies and activities of the student body and makes appro- 
priate recommendations to the proper authorities. It is also responsible for 
disbursement of student activities fund, arranges the social program for 
the year, and maintains liaison with the Student Union Board. 

Honor Council 

The Honor Council, elected by the Student Body, is responsible for the 
interpretation and execution of the Honor Code. Acceptance of the pro- 
visions and obligations of this Code is required of all students entering the 
Medical School. 

Baltimore Student Union Board 

The Board is a representative body of those students who live in the Stu- 
dent Union. The Medical Student Council maintains liaison with the Board. 

Student American Medical Association 

This organization is designed to prepare the future physician for full 
participation in the field of Medicine. Furthermore, the active chapter is 
responsible for student liaison with high school and college groups, for pub- 
lication of the bimonthly Asclepian, and for other important and educational 
and service activities of value to individual students. The Asclepian covers 
Medical School news including the latest developments in areas of concern 
to medical students and faculty. 

Women's Auxiliary, Student American Medical Association 

The Women's Auxiliary helps wives and medical students prepare them- 
selves for their future responsibilities as wives of physicians. It has promoted 
closer association among the student wives, both with each other and with 
wives of faculty members and particfpating physicians. The Auxiliary actively 
participates in many functions for the betterment of the Medical School, 
including supervision of the used microscope and book sale. 

Omega Mu 

The women students in School of Medicine recently organized their own 
sorority. Faculty and students are provided a social atmosphere to ex- 
change ideas of mutual interest. Functions include guest dinner speakers, 
special program for incoming freshmen and lectures for entire student body. 



26 I School of Medicine 

Student Health Organization 

Baltimore Chapter was formed by medical, nursing, dental, and social work 
students at the University of Maryland with the basic tenet that health pro- 
fession students have an objective to work together within the community. 
Community health projects are undertaken. 

The Yearbook 

The Yearbook, Terra Mariae Medicus, which covers all the facets of stu- 
dent activities, is compiled by the students. Originating as Bones, Molars, 
and Briefs, the Yearbook has provided a continuous record of graduating 
classes as far back as 1896. It is the outstanding record of student life. The 
cost of the Yearbook is included in the Student Activities Fee; hence, all 
medical students are entitled to receive a copy annually without further 
charge. 

Student Council Intramural Athletic Program 

Each year the Student Council sponsors an intramural athletic program 
which consists of competition, generally interclass, in touch football, basket- 
ball, softball, and tennis. Furthermore, a faculty-student softball game is a 
feature of the annual Medical Student Council Spring Picnic. 

The Interfraternity Council 

The purpose of the Council is to further the interests and improve the co- 
ordination and cooperation of the member groups. Each fraternity is repre- 
sented by its President and Social Chairman. One of these representatives is 
chosen President for the school year on a rotating basis. 

The Interfraternity Council organizes the Freshmen Orientation Program. 

Alpha Omega Alpha: National Honorary Medical Society 

The Beta chapter of Maryland was established at the University of Mary- 
land in 1949. Medical students possessing outstanding qualities of moral 
integrity, scholarship, and leadership are elected to membership in their 
third or fourth years. The Society sponsors an annual lectureship, a forum 
for the presentation of medical student research, and chapter meetings on 
topics of social, educational, and philosophical interest to medical students 
and faculty. 

Housing — Student Union 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accom- 
modations for both men and women are provided in a five-story semi-air- 
conditioned building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meet- 
ing rooms, laundry facilities, game room, bookstore, barbershop and lounges 
on each floor. Double rooms only are available. The rental agreement is 
made for rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The 
contract for accommodations covers the academic year. The charge for 
each student in a double room is $215.00 per semester. 



University of Maryland I 27 

The room rate includes the following room furnishings: bed and cover, 
mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, 
desk chair and desk lamp. Telephone service is available through the Chesa- 
peake & Potomac Telephone Company. Cost of the telephone is not in- 
cluded in the room rate. Information on the Baltimore Union and on 
private housing can be obtained from the Director's Office. Mail Service 
is also provided. 

Towels and linens may be rented from the Gordon-Davis Linen Service or 
each resident may provide his own. A small amount of luggage space is 
available. Storage of anything other than luggage will not be available. 

Application forms may be secured from the Director's Office, The Baltimore 
Union, 621 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Rooms will be 
assigned only on receipt of an application form duly executed and accom- 
panied by the required deposit. 



Buildings and Facilities 

Davidge Hall 

This hall, at 522 West Lombard Street, is named after the first dean, Dr. 
John Beale Davidge, and was the first building of the medical school to be 
erected. It was completed in 1812 and is a replica of the Pantheon in Rome. 
It is the oldest structure in this country from which the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine has been granted annually since its erection. It is located at the N.E. 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets and houses the offices of the Dean, 
and his staff, the Committee on Admissions, the Postgraduate Committee, 
Medical Alumni Office, in addition to Chemical and Anatomical Halls. 

Administration Building 

520 West Lombard Street contains facilities of the Department of Physical 
Therapy. 

Bressler Research Laboratory 

The Frank C. Bressler Research Laboratory at 29 S. Greene Street, a me- 
morial to a generous alumnus, was completed in 1940. 

It houses the Department of Anatomy in addition to the research facilities 
of the departments of Medicine and Surgery, animal quarters, the Bressler 
Memorial Room, and the Baltimore Offices of the Board of Regents and the 
President of the University. 

Gray Laboratory 

This building houses research laboratories of the various Clinical Depart- 
ments and offices of the Department of Physical Therapy. 

Howard Hall 

660 West Redwood Street houses the Departments of Biochemistry, Bio- 
physics, Cell Biology and Pharmacology, Microbiology, Pathology, and Physi- 
ology in addition to the Health Sciences Computer Center and the Central 
Animal Quarters of the School of Medicine. In this building also are located 
the Baltimore Office of the Registrar and Cashier, the Office of Admissions, 
and various other administrative offices of the Schools on the Baltimore 
Campus. 

Medical Technology Building 

31 South Greene Street houses some of the offices and laboratories of the 
Department of Pathology, offices of the Department of Preventive Medicine, 
and research laboratories of the Department of Pediatrics. 

28 




University of Maryland Hospital 




Medical Technology Building 




John Eager Howard Hall 



32 I School of Medicine 

University of Maryland Hospital 

The University of Maryland Hospital is part of the University of Mary- 
land. It is one of the oldest institutions for the care of the sick in the State of 
Maryland. It was opened in September 1823, under the name of the Balti- 
more Infirmary and at that time consisted of only four wards, one of which 
was reserved for patients with diseases of the eye. 

In 1933-1934 the present Hospital was erected with a capacity of 435 
beds and 65 bassinets. In 1952-1953 a modern Psychiatric Institute Building 
was erected and a junctional wing was added to the general hospital. New 
additions have increased the hospital bed capacity to 648 beds and 70 
bassinets devoted to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, psy- 
chiatry, and the various medical and surgical specialties. All hospital accom- 
modations, whether private, seimprivate, ward, or specialized, are available 
to the teaching programs. 

The hospital buildings are situated opposite the Medical School buildings. 
The students, therefore, are in close proximity to the clinical facilities of the 
Hospital. The hospital is the major clinical teaching facility of the Medical 
School. 

Emergency Service 

The Emergency Service of the hospital receives and treats a large number 
of emergency cases because of its proximity to the largest manufacturing and 
shipping districts of the city. During the past fiscal year a total of approxi- 
mately 50,000 patients were treated in the Emergency Room. 

Out Patient Department 

The Out Patient Department is in the old University Hospital. It provides 
space and facilities for more than fifty clinics, the departments of X-ray, a 
pharmacy, laboratory, and other ancillary services. 

Visits to the various clinics of the Out Patient Department during the last 
fiscal year totaled approximately 146,000. 

Health Sciences Library 

The Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing and Social Work 
and Community Planning are served by the Health Sciences Library in a mod- 
ern, four-story library building. The oldest part of the library collection dates 
back to 1813 when the University of Maryland purchased the books of Dr. 
John Crawford to form a medicai library. The present library contains more 
than 140,000 bound volumes and regularly receives over 2,700 scientific peri- 
odicals and annual publications. 

During the academic year, the library is open 87 hours per week (six 
nights per week until 11:00 p.m.), with staff trained to give reference service 
on duty most of these hours. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and the 
Welch Medical Library of the Johns Hopkins University are open to students 
of the School of Medicine without charge. Other scholarly libraries of Balti- 
more making their resources available are the Peabody Library and the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library. 





Administration Building 



34 I School of Medicine 
Library Staff 

ROVELSTAD, Howard, Director of Libraries and Professor of Library Science; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 1940. 
*ROBINSON, Ida Marian, Librarian Emeritus; A.B., Cornell University, 1924; B.S.L.S., Co- 
lumbia University School of Library Service, 1944. 
*MOORE, Hilda E., Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science; A.B., Randolph- 
Macon Woman's College, 1936; A.B.L.S., Emory University Library School, 1937. 
*COYLE, Edith M., Assistant Librarian for Technical Services; A.B., University of North 
Carolina, 1937; A.B.L.S., University of North Carolina School of Library Science, 1939; 
M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 
*MITTEN, Eleanor M., Assistant Librarian for Readers' Services; B.S., Cornell University, 
1942; B.S.L.S., Syracuse University School of Library Science, 1949. 

ABAR, Ellen L., Assistant Serials Librarian; B.S.. University of Michigan, 1965; A.M.L.S., 
1968. 

BROOKMAN, Patricia C, Acquisitions Assistant. 

CANNON, Carole N., Circulation Assistant. 

CHAFFIN, Regina F., Cataloging Assistant. 

DeFAY, Helen D., Acquisitions Assistant. 
*DeMANGE, Kathryn K., Head, Acquisitions Department; B.A., Fresno State College, 1954; 

M.L.S., University of Maryland, 1967. 
*DORFLER, Melayn, Documents Librarian; B.S.. Denison University, 1963; A.M.L.S., University 
of Michigan, 1965. 

EICHNER, June E., Circulation Assistant. 

FENG, Margaret S. C, Assistant Cataloger; B.A., National Taiwan University, 1960; 
B.L.S., University of Ottawa, 1963. 

FISHER, Janet S., Assistant Reference Librarian; A.B., Jacksonville (Ala.) State Univer- 
sity, 1965; M.S., Florida State University, 1967. 

HANNA, Ruth E., Reference Librarian; A.B., Hanover College, 1939; M.S.L.S., Catholic 
University of America, 1961. 

HLAVIN. Lorraine S., Serials Assistant 

HOBGOOD, Ella M., Reference Assistant. 

HOSAIN, Parvathi, Cataloger; B.Sc, Andhra University (India), 1948; M.Sc, Lucknow 
University (India), 1953; A. I.N. P., Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of 
Calcutta (India), 1955; Dip. Lib., University of Calcutta, 1959. 

JOHNSON, Millard F., Jr., Systems Analyst; B.S., University of Washington, 1968; M.L.S., 
1969; Certificate in Computer Librarianship, Washington University, 1970. 

JONES, Margaret M., Head, Cataloging Department; A.B., Shaw University, 1947; M.S.L.S., 
Atlanta University School of Library Service, 1951. 

KYLER, Cecilia J., Serials Assistant. 

LEE, Clarice F., Head, Circulation Department; A.B., Morgan State College, 1950. 

LISTFELDT, Hans-Guenther R., Head, Serials Department; B.S., Loyola College, 1 956; 
M.S.L.S., Catholic University of America, 1961; Ph.L. 1967. 

LISTFELDT, Mary S., Head, Reference Department; B.A., New York State College for 
Teachers (Albany), 1944; B.L.S., University of Wisconsin Library School, 1947. 

LOTZ, F. Gwendolyn, Circulation Assistant; R.N. (Canada); Hamilton (Ontario) General 
Hospital, 1932. 

MILLER, Susan C, Acquisitions Assistant. 

NICKOL, Anne R., Circulation-Reserve Book Room Assistant; B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1970. 

O'BRIEN, Mary W., Cataloging Assistant. 

PALMER, Elizabeth, Assistant to the Librarian. 

REDFEARN, Louise M., Assistant to the Systems Analyst. 

RIBEIRO, Patricia V.. Acquisitions Librarian; B.A., University of Hong Kong, 1959; M.L.S., 
University of California (Berkeley), 1960. 








Health Sciences Library 



RICHARDS, Katherine M., Historical Librarian; B.A., Marylhurst College, 1964; M.L.S., 
Indiana University, 1968; Certificate, Johns Hopkins University Medical Library, 1969. 

ROMAN, Margaret M., Reference Assistant. 

SAMPSON, Diane, Acquisitions Assistant. 

SNOWDEN, Claudine N., Reference Assistant; B.A., North Carolina College, 1944. 

STADLER, Tomas J., Circulation-Reserve Book Room Assistant 

STERLING, Elwood, Serials Assistant 

WILKINS, Henry, General Library Assistant 

WISOWATY, Evelyn C, Circulation Assistant; B.A.. Westhampton College, University 
of Richmond, 1942. 

^Certified Medical Librarian 



Affiliated Institutions 



Mercy Hospital 

Mercy Hospital traces its history to the foundation of the Washington 
School of Medicine in 1824. In 1872, some of the members of this institu- 
tion founded a new school, which was the beginning of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore. 

Washington School of Medicine opened a dispensary and a small hospital 
at the corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets and named it the Baltimore 
City Hospital. This building served both as a hospital and a medical school. 
In 1874, the Sisters of Mercy, upon the invitation of Washington School of 
Medicine, assumed responsibility for the Nursing Services of the hospital. In 
1876, Washington University merged with the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 

In 1888, the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, began construction of a new hospital 
adjacent to the earlier buildings. In 1909, the name of the institution was 
changed to "Mercy Hospital" and in 1911 another larger hospital building 
was constructed occupying the remaining frontage on that block of Calvert 
Street. The